Bernhard Wehrli: Catalogue data in Spring Semester 2016

Name Prof. Dr. Bernhard Wehrli
FieldAquatische Chemie
Address
I. f. Biogeochemie/Schadstoffdyn.
ETH Zürich, CHN E 19.1
Universitätstrasse 16
8092 Zürich
SWITZERLAND
Telephone+41 44 632 85 05
E-mailbernhard.wehrli@env.ethz.ch
DepartmentEnvironmental Systems Science
RelationshipFull Professor

NumberTitleECTSHoursLecturers
701-0038-02LField Course Chemistry and Environment Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 60.
Priority is given to BSc Environmental Sciences students.

Only one Field Course can be chosen per semester: Field Course Ecology (701-0038-01L) Field Course Chemistry and Environment (701-0038-02L).
1 credit2UB. Wehrli
AbstractThe field course consist of an introductory part and two days of field work focusing on a lake system. The students will gather insights into sensor technology for quantifying hydrological and chemical processes. They learn how to evaluate data series and to apply simple models in order to address questions of water management.
ObjectiveThe studens get familiar with in-situ measurements and sampling of water and sediments. They use their knowledge in chemistry and systems analysis in order to address questions of ecosystem functions and the management of a lake in an intensively modified environment.
ContentThe introduction (3 hours) covers the basic themes of
* lakes as biogeochemical systems, stratrification of the water column, variability of in- and outflows, sediment archives,
* typical measurement systems for hydrological and chemical parameters,
* working groups for the field days and workplan.

In the field course the students work in groups on three different topics
1. The lake reflects its catchment: The students analyze nutrient loads in the inflows and the outflow and use existing data to construct a mass balance

2. Sediment archives: We retrieve sediment cores in order to estimate sedimenation rates and to reconstruct the changes in water quality over the last century.

3. From light to darkness: Using profiling equippment the students analyze the vertical stratification of the lake and the varibility of light and chemical parameters.

4. Think about it! In the fourth part the students assemble the different facts in order to draw some practical conclusions.
Lecture notesA guide for the field work and electronic data series will be avialable.
Prerequisites / NoticeBachelor courses: Chemie I und II (529-2001-02, 529-2002-02)
701-0420-01LPractical Training in Biogeochemistry Information 7 credits14PB. Wehrli, T. Kalvelage, P. U. Lehmann Grunder, D. Radny, M. H. Schroth, A. Voegelin
AbstractThe course offers practical training biogeochemical analyses. The first half of the semester is focused on terrestrial systems and all students learn how to analyse soil systems with physical, chemical and microbiological methods. Later, they form small groups and work on small research projects situated around an river-groundwater system.
ObjectiveThe students learn to apply physical, chemical and microbiological analysis tools in the laboratroy and the field. They use their theoretical knowledge to interpret their own data, and to critically assess and document them.
Lecture notesDescriptions of the methodologies will be provided.
701-1302-00LTerm Paper 2: Seminar
Prerequisite: Term Paper 1: Writing (701-1303-00L).
2 credits1SK. McNeill, M. Ackermann, N. Gruber, J. Hering, R. Kretzschmar, M.  Lever, M. H. Schroth, B. Wehrli, L. Winkel
AbstractThis class is the 2nd part of a series and participation is conditional on the successful completion of the Term paper Writing class (701-1303-00L). The results from the term paper written during the winter term are presented to the other students and advisors and discussed.
ObjectiveThe goal of the term paper Seminars is to train the student's ability to communicate the results to a wider audience and the ability to respond to questions and comments.
ContentEach student presents the results of the term paper to the other students and advisors and responds to questions and comments from the audience.
Lecture notesNone
LiteratureTerm paper
Prerequisites / NoticeThe term papers will be made publically available after each student had the opportunity to make revisions.

There is no final exam. Grade is assigned based on the quality of the presentation and ensuing discussion.
701-1303-00LTerm Paper 1: Writing Restricted registration - show details 5 credits6AM. H. Schroth, M. Ackermann, N. Gruber, J. Hering, R. Kretzschmar, M.  Lever, K. McNeill, B. Wehrli, L. Winkel
AbstractThe ability to critically evaluate original (scientific) literature and to summarize the information in
a succinct manner is an important skill for any student. This course aims to practice this ability, requiring each student to write a term paper on a topic of relevance for research in the areas of biogeochemistry and pollutant dynamics.
ObjectiveThe goal of the term paper is to train the student's ability to
critically evaluate a well-defined set of research subjects, and to
summarize the findings concisely in a paper of scientific quality. The
paper will be evaluated based on its ability to communicate an
understanding of a topic, and to identify key outstanding questions.
Results from this term paper will be presented to the fellow students and
involved faculty in the following semester (Term paper seminars)
ContentEach student is expected to write a paper with a length of approximately 15 pages. The students can choose from a list of topics prepared by the supervisors, but the final topic will be determined based on a balance of choice and availability. The students will be guided and advised by their advisors throughout the term. The paper itself should contain the following elements: Motivation and context of the given topic (25%), Concise presentation of the state of the science (50%), Identification of open questions and perhaps outline of opportunities for research (25).
In addition, the accurate use of citations, attribution of ideas, and the judicious use of figures, tables, equations and references are critical components of a successful paper. Specialized knowledge is not expected, nor required, neither is new research.
Lecture notesGuidelines and supplementary material will be handed out at the beginning of the class.
LiteratureWill be identified based on the chosen topic.
Prerequisites / NoticeEach term paper will be reviewed by one fellow student and one faculty. The submission of a written review is a condition for obtaining the credit points.
There is no final exam. Grade is assigned based on the quality of the term paper and the submission of another student's review.
860-0012-00LCooperation and Conflict Over International Water Resources
Note: Replacement of 701-0462-01L "The Science and Politics of International Water Management".
Students who already attended 701-0462-01L, kann not be credited again for this course.
3 credits2SB. Wehrli, T. Bernauer, J. Mertens
AbstractThis course focuses on the technical, economic, and political challenges of dealing with water allocation and pollution problems in large international river basins. It examines ways and means through which such challenges are addressed, and when and why international efforts in this respect succeed or fail.

This is a research seminar at the Master level. PhD students are also welcome.
ObjectiveThe students get an overview of (1) causes and consequences of water scarcity and water pollution problems in large international river basins; (2) they learn concepts to assess and mitigate such water challenges, and (3) they analyze when and why international efforts in this respect succeed or fail.
ContentBased on lectures and discussion of scientific papers students acquire basic knowledge on contentious issues in managing international water resources, on the determinants of cooperation and conflict over international water issues, and on ways and means of mitigating conflict and promoting cooperation. Students will then, in teams of two and coached by Profs. Bernauer and Wehrli, do research on a case of their choice (i.e. an international river basin where riparian countries are trying to find solutions to water allocation and/or water quality problems). They will write a brief paper and present their findings during a final meeting at the end of the semester.
The first 4 and the last 2 dates are reserved for lectures and seminars. The students work on their case study from 22.03. to 17.05.
Lecture notesslides and papers will be distributed electronically
LiteratureThe UN World Water Development Report 2015 provides a broad overview of the topic
http://www.unwater.org/publications/publications-detail/en/c/281166/
Prerequisites / NoticeThe course is open to Master and PhD students from any area of ETH.
860-0015-00LSupply and Responsible Use of Mineral Resources I3 credits2GC. A. Heinrich, L. Bretschger, F. Brugger, S. Hellweg, B. Wehrli
AbstractStudents critically assess the economic, social, political, and environmental implications of extracting and using energy resources, metals, and bulk materials along the mineral resource cycle for society. They explore various decision-making tools that support policies and guidelines pertaining to mineral resources, and gain insight into different perspectives from government, industry, and NGOs.
ObjectiveStudents will be able to:
- Explain basic concepts applied in resource economics, economic geology, extraction, processing and recycling technologies, environmental and health impact assessments, resource governance, and secondary materials.
- Evaluate the policies and guidelines pertaining to mineral resource extraction.
- Examine decision-making tools for mineral resource related projects.
- Engage constructively with key actors from governmental organizations, mining and trading companies, and NGOs, dealing with issues along the mineral resource cycle.
LiteratureURL: https://moodle-app2.let.ethz.ch/course/view.php?id=1403
Prerequisites / NoticeSeven week course offered from February 23rd to April 14th.
This course is prerequisite for the case study module course
860-0016-00 Supply and Responsible Use of Mineral Resources II.
Bachelor of Science or Engineering, and enrolled in a Master's or PhD program at ETH Zurich.
860-0016-00LSupply and Responsible Use of Mineral Resources II Information Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 12.

Prerequisite:
3 credits2UB. Wehrli, F. Brugger, C. A. Heinrich, N. Lefebvre, J. Mertens
AbstractStudents integrate their knowledge of mineral resources and technical skills to frame and investigate a commodity-specific challenge faced by countries involved in resource extraction. By own research they evaluate possible policy-relevant solutions, engaging in interdisciplinary teams coached by tutors and experts from natural social and engineering sciences.
ObjectiveStudents will be able to:
- Integrate, and extend by own research, their knowledge of mineral resources from course 860-0015-00, in a solution-oriented team with mixed expertise
- Apply their problem solving, and analytical skills to critically assess, and define a complex, real-world mineral resource problem, and propose possible solutions.
- Summarize and synthesize published literature and expert knowledge, evaluate decision-making tools, and policies applied to mineral resources.
- Document and communicate the findings in concise group presentations and a report.
Lecture notesURL: https://moodle-app2.let.ethz.ch/course/view.php?id=1403
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisite is 860-0015-00 Supply and Responsible Use of Mineral Resources I. Limited to 12 participants, and the lecturers will compose two teams of mixed background and expertise. First priority will be given to students enrolled in the Master of Science, Technology, and Policy Program. These students must confirm their participation by February 8th by registration through MyStudies. Other graduate students interested in enrolling will be placed onto a waiting list when registering through MyStudies. In addition, these students should please send an e-mail to Prof. Heinrich (christoph.heinrich@erdw.ethz.ch) explaining their motivation in a few sentences.