Bernhard Wehrli: Catalogue data in Spring Semester 2021

Name Prof. Dr. Bernhard Wehrli
FieldAquatische Chemie
Address
I. f. Biogeochemie/Schadstoffdyn.
ETH Zürich, CHN E 19.1
Universitätstrasse 16
8092 Zürich
SWITZERLAND
Telephone+41 44 632 85 05
E-mailbernhard.wehrli@env.ethz.ch
DepartmentEnvironmental Systems Science
RelationshipProfessor emeritus

NumberTitleECTSHoursLecturers
701-0034-20LIntegrated Practical: Cycle of Matter in Lakes Restricted registration - show details 3 credits3PB. Wehrli
AbstractWe analyse a lake as a biogeochemical environmental system.
1. Catchment: We determine the material loads of in- and outflows and trends in the lake's reservoir
2. Sediment archives: We estimate sedimentation rates and reconstruct the environmental history.
3. Light and dark: We analyse vertical water profiles and estimate rates of photosynthesis and respiration.
ObjectiveStudents learn how to analyze a lake as a biogeochemical system
• They apply relevant methods for sampling and analyzing chemical parameters of rivers, lake water and the sediment.
• They calculate fluxes via the in- and outflows and they determine long-term changes in the budget of a lake
• Students are able to estimate sedimentation rates and to reconstruct environmental history from sediment records
• They apply simple models to quantify process rates of photosynthesis and respiration based on the daily and seasonal dynamics of chemical concentrations in the water column.
ContentViele Schweizer Seen haben seit den 1950er Jahre eine Phase der Überdüngung durchgemacht. Dank verbesserter Abwasserbehandlung, Phosphatverbot und Massnahmen in der Landwirtschaft hat sich die Wasserqualität in vielen Seen in den letzten Jahrzehnten stark verbessert. Die Zielsetzung einer mittleren Produktion und einer genügenden Sauerstoffversorgung in der Tiefe ist in vielen Fällen erreicht worden. Der Gemeindeverband am Sempachersee hat zusätzliche See-interne Massnahmen durchgeführt. In diesem Praktikum analysieren wir den aktuellen Zustand der Nährstoffbelastung aus Landwirtschaft und Abwasser, wir rekonstruieren langfristige Trends und wir ermitteln die Zusammenhänge zwischen den Stoffkreisläfen von Phosphor, Stickstoff, Sauerstoff und den Treibhausgasen von Kohlenstoff.
Lecture notesDetailed handouts will be distributed via Moodle
Literaturehttps://sempachersee.ch/ website in German
Prerequisites / Noticenone
701-0900-00LThe Sustainable Development Goals in Context Information 2 credits2GB. Wehrli, O. Kassab
AbstractThe United Nations Agenda 2030 and its 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) provide an opportunity for the international community to shape the course of sustainable development. With their range of expertise, universities can develop the science to help achieving the SDGs. The lectures center on sustainability challenges and provide context from academics and societal actors.
Objective1. Students know important dimensions of sustainable development and the discourses in the context of the SDGs
2. Students get an overview how ETH Zurich contributes to sustainable development and the achievement of the SDGs
3. The lecture series enables students to contribute to sustainable development during their studies and research, as graduates on the job market, and as members of the society
4. Writing and reviewing a short blog post trains students to communicate acquired knowledge effectively for a broader audience.
ContentKick-Off: Introduction to the SDGs:
1 – Education, gender and inequality
2 – Health, well-being and demography
3 – Climate change, decarbonization and sustainable industry
4 – Sustainable food, land, water and oceans
5 – Sustainable cities and communities
6 – Digital revolution for sustainable development
Conclusion: Student inputs: Wrap up and synthesis
Lecture notes1-2 short papers will be posted on the Moodle each weak.
LiteratureSelected scientific articles:

Sachs, J. D. (2019). Six Transformations to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals. Nature Sustainability, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41893-019-0352-9

Schwan, G. (2019): Sustainable Development Goals: A call for global partnership and cooperation. GAIA 28/2, 73, DOI: https://doi.org/10.14512/gaia.28.2.1
Prerequisites / NoticeOpen to advanced Bachelor and all Master level students enrolled at ETH Zurich
701-0909-00LSeminar Environmental Systems Restricted registration - show details
Only for Environmental Sciences BSc.
3 credits2SB. Wehrli, U. Brändle
AbstractStudents work in teams to develop an interdisciplinary research question on the basis of a current environmental topic. They research the literature necessary to answer it and create an overview of the scientific facts. On this basis, they then produce information material for a non-scientific audience in a selected media form.
ObjectiveStudents are able to
- develop a question on a given interdisciplinary environmental topic by researching the current research literature and documenting it in a literature management program
- summarise the scientific facts relevant to a given question in a collaborative approach
- prepare and communicate scientific facts for a given question in a suitable form for a non-scientific audience
Content• Input von Spezialisten zu geeigneten Kommunikationsformen und Medien (z.b. Review Paper / Kurzvideo / Wikipedia-Artikel / ETH-Life-Artikel/NZZ-Artikel/TransformationMap/Blog/Interaktive GIS-Karte/Management Summary/Argumentenkatalog/TV-Interview/ …)
• Input zu Recherche und Schreiben in interdisziplinären Gruppen; Input “Interdisziplinäre Publikationen”
• Review und Synthese der aktuellen Literatur zu einem vorgegebenen interdisziplinären Themenkreis (z.B. Kivu-See-Methan, Moorböden und CO2-Ziele, Fischerei und Phosphat, thermische Verschmutzung/Restwasser, …)
• Arbeit in interdisziplinären Gruppen aus den Vertiefungen (versch. «Experten»)
• Work-in-Progess Diskussionen der wissenschaftlichen Summaries (SW6) und Informationsmaterialien (SW10) sowie Schlusspräsentationen (SW13/14)
Prerequisites / NoticeSeminar in der Systemvertiefung im 5.Semester oder gleichwertiges Literaturseminar besucht
701-1302-00LTerm Paper 2: Seminar Restricted registration - show details
Prerequisite: Term Paper 1: Writing (701-1303-00L).

Only for Environmental Sciences MSc and Science, Technology and Policy MSc.
2 credits1SL. Winkel, M. Ackermann, K. Deiner, N. Gruber, J. Hering, R. Kretzschmar, M. Lever, K. McNeill, D. Mitrano, A. N'Guyen van Chinh, M. H. Schroth, B. Wehrli
AbstractThis class is the 2nd part of a series and participation is conditional on the successful completion of "Term Paper 1: Writing". The results from the term paper written during the previous term are presented to the other students and advisors and discussed with the audience.
ObjectiveThe goal of the term paper seminars is to train the student's ability to communicate (scientific) results to a wider audience and the ability to respond to questions and comments.
ContentEach student presents the results of their term paper to fellow students and advisors and responds to questions and comments from the audience.
Lecture notesGuidelines and supplementary material are distributed on the Moodle platform.
Prerequisites / NoticeThere is no final exam. Grade is assigned based on the quality of the presentation and ensuing discussion.

To obtain the credits, it is mandatory to attend at least 60% of all seminar dates offered in the fall and spring semester. Active participation in discussion and feedback rounds is expected.
860-0012-00LCooperation and Conflict Over International Water Resources Restricted registration - show details
Does not take place this semester.
Number of participants limited to 40.
Priority for Science, Technology, and Policy MSc.

This is a research seminar at the Master level. PhD students are also welcome.
3 credits2SB. Wehrli
AbstractThis seminar focuses on the technical, economic, and political challenges of dealing with water allocation and pollution problems in large international river systems. It examines ways and means through which such challenges are addressed, and when and why international efforts in this respect succeed or fail.
ObjectiveAbility to (1) understand the causes and consequences of water scarcity and water pollution problems in large international river systems; (2) understand ways and means of addressing such water challenges; and (3) analyse when and why international efforts in this respect succeed or fail.
ContentBased on lectures and discussion of scientific papers and reports, students acquire basic knowledge on contentious issues in managing international water resources, on the determinants of cooperation and conflict over international water issues, and on ways and means of mitigating conflict and promoting cooperation. Students will then, in small teams coached by the instructors, carry out research on a case of their choice (i.e. an international river basin where riparian countries are trying to find solutions to water allocation and/or water quality problems associated with a large dam project). They will write a brief paper and present their findings towards the end of the semester.
Lecture notesSlides and reading materials will be distributed electronically.
LiteratureThe UN World Water Development Reports provide a broad overview of the topic: http://www.unesco.org/new/en/natural-sciences/environment/water/wwap/
Prerequisites / NoticeThe course is open to Master and PhD students from any area of ETH.

ISTP students who take this course should also register for the course 860-0012-01L - Cooperation and conflict over international water resources; In-depth case study.
860-0012-01LCooperation and Conflict Over International Water Resources, In-Depth Case Study Restricted registration - show details
Does not take place this semester.
Only for Science, Technology, and Policy MSc and PhD students.

Prerequisite: you have to be enrolled in 860-0012-00L during the same semester.
3 credits2AB. Wehrli, T. Bernauer
AbstractStudents write an individual term paper on technical, economic, and political water challenges in an international context. Coached by one of the instructors, students develop and write a case study that examines ways and means to address a specific challenge, and to evaluate success or failure of international collaboration.
ObjectiveIn developing their individual term paper, the students broaden their overview of (1) causes and consequences of water scarcity and water pollution problems in an international context; (2) they assess concepts and policies to mitigate a specific water challenge, and (3) they analyze determinants of success or failure of international collaboration in the water sectors.
ContentIn the basic course on Cooperation and Conflict... 860-0012-00L the students students acquire basic knowledge on contentious issues in managing international water resources, on the determinants of cooperation and conflict over international water issues, and on ways and means of mitigating conflict and promoting cooperation.
In this course, which is reserved to STP students, the participants will be individually coached by one of the instructors and do research and develop a case-study paper on an international water challenge of their choice. The topic should avoid overlap with the work in course 860-0012-00L.
Lecture notessee 860-0012-00L
LiteratureIn a global context, the targets of sustainable development goal 6 serve as a possible starting point: http://bit.ly/2yVARMG

In the European context, the implementation reports of the Water Framework Directive represent another reference frame: http://bit.ly/2y5NPLl
Prerequisites / NoticeThis course is reserved for STP students who participate in the basic course on Cooperation and Conflict Over International Water Resources 860-0012-00L.

STP students should sign up for both courses, 860-0012-00L and 860-0012-01L.
860-0015-00LSupply and Responsible Use of Mineral Resources I Restricted registration - show details 3 credits2GB. Wehrli, F. Brugger, K. Dolejs Schlöglova, M. Haupt, C. Karydas
AbstractStudents critically assess the economic, social, political, and environmental implications of extracting and using energy resources, metals, and bulk materials along the mineral resource cycle for society. They explore various decision-making tools that support policies and guidelines pertaining to mineral resources, and gain insight into different perspectives from government, industry, and NGOs.
ObjectiveStudents will be able to:
- Explain basic concepts applied in resource economics, economic geology, extraction, processing and recycling technologies, environmental and health impact assessments, resource governance, and secondary materials.
- Evaluate the policies and guidelines pertaining to mineral resource extraction.
- Examine decision-making tools for mineral resource related projects.
- Engage constructively with key actors from governmental organizations, mining and trading companies, and NGOs, dealing with issues along the mineral resource cycle.
Prerequisites / NoticeBachelor of Science, Architecture or Engineering, and enrolled in a Master's or PhD program at ETH Zurich. Students must be enrolled in this course in order to participate in the case study module course 860-0016-00 Supply and Responsible Use of Mineral Resources II.
860-0016-00LSupply and Responsible Use of Mineral Resources II Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 12.
First priority will be given to students enrolled in the Master of Science, Technology, and Policy Program. These students must confirm their participation by 12.02.2021 by registration through myStudies. Students on the waiting list will be notified at the start of the semester.

Prerequisite is 860-0015-00 Supply and Responsible Use of Mineral Resources I.
3 credits2UB. Wehrli, F. Brugger, S. Pfister
AbstractStudents integrate their knowledge of mineral resources and technical skills to frame and investigate a commodity-specific challenge faced by countries involved in resource extraction. By own research they evaluate possible policy-relevant solutions, engaging in interdisciplinary teams coached by tutors and experts from natural social and engineering sciences.
ObjectiveStudents will be able to:
- Integrate, and extend by own research, their knowledge of mineral resources from course 860-0015-00, in a solution-oriented team with mixed expertise
- Apply their problem solving, and analytical skills to critically assess, and define a complex, real-world mineral resource problem, and propose possible solutions.
- Summarize and synthesize published literature and expert knowledge, evaluate decision-making tools, and policies applied to mineral resources.
- Document and communicate the findings in concise group presentations and a report.
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisite is 860-0015-00 Supply and Responsible Use of Mineral Resources I. Limited to 12 participants. First priority will be given to students enrolled in the Master of Science, Technology, and Policy Program. These students must confirm their participation by February 7th by registration through MyStudies. Students on the waiting list will be notified at the start of the semester.