Autumn Semester 2020 takes place in a mixed form of online and classroom teaching.
Please read the published information on the individual courses carefully.

Renate Schubert: Catalogue data in Autumn Semester 2016

Name Prof. Dr. Renate Schubert
FieldNationalökonomie
Address
Professur für Nationalökonomie
ETH Zürich, CLD C 12.1
Clausiusstrasse 37
8092 Zürich
SWITZERLAND
Telephone+41 44 632 47 17
E-mailschubert@econ.gess.ethz.ch
DepartmentHumanities, Social and Political Sciences
RelationshipProfessor Emeritus

NumberTitleECTSHoursLecturers
101-0439-00LIntroduction to Economic Analysis - A Case Study Approach with Cost Benefit Analysis in Transport6 credits4GK. W. Axhausen, R. Schubert
AbstractThe course presents cost benefit analysis and related evaluation methods in transport and introduces the survey methods used to derive the monetary values of non-market goods.
ObjectiveFamiliarity with the essential methods of project appraisal
ContentCost-Benefit-Analysis; multi-criteria analysis; European guidelines; stated response methods; travel cost approach and others; Valuation of travel time savings; valuation of traffic safety
Lecture notesHandouts
LiteratureVSS (2006) SN 640 820: Kosten-Nutzen-Analysen im Strassenverkehr, VSS, Zürich.

Boardman, A.E., D.H. Greenberg, A.R. Vining und D.L. Weimer (2001) Cost – Benefit – Analysis: Concepts and Practise, Prentice-Hall, Upper Saddle River.

ecoplan and metron (2005) Kosten-Nutzen-Analysen im Strassenverkehr: Kommentar zu SN 640 820, UVEK, Bern.
701-0757-AALPrinciples of Economics Information
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
3 credits6RR. Schubert
AbstractStudents understand basic microeconomics and macroeconomics problems and theories. They are able to argue along economic principles and to judge policy measures.
ObjectiveStudents should be enabled to understand basic microeconomics and macroeconomics problems and theories. They should be able to argue along economic principles and to judge policy measures.
ContentSupply and demand behaviour of firm and households; market equilibrium and taxation; national income and indicators; inflation ; unemployment; growth; macroeconomics policies
Lecture notesavailable on electronic platform
LiteratureMankiw, N.G.: "Principles of Economics", fourth edition, South-Western College/West, Mason 2006.

German translation: Mankiw, N.G. : Grundzüge der Volkswirtschaftslehre, 3rd. edition, Stuttgart 2004.
Prerequisites / Noticeelectronic plattform
701-0757-00LPrinciples of Economics Information 3 credits2GR. Schubert
AbstractThis course covers the bases for understanding micro- and macroeconomic issues and theories. Participants are given the tools to argue in economic and political terms and to evaluate the corresponding measures. Group and individual exercises deepen the knowledge gained.
ObjectiveStudents are able to
- describe fundamental micro- and macroeconomic issues and theories.
- apply suitable economic arguments to a given theme.
- evaluate economic measures.
ContentSupply and demand behaviour of firm and households; market equilibrium and taxation; national income and indicators; inflation ; unemployment; growth; macroeconomics policies
Lecture notesavailable on electronic platform
LiteratureMankiw, N.G.: “Principles of Economics”, fourth edition, South-Western College/West, Mason 2006.

German translation: Mankiw, N.G. : Grundzüge der Volkswirtschaftslehre, 3rd. edition, Stuttgart 2004.
Prerequisites / Noticeelectronic plattform
851-0252-04LBehavioral Studies Colloquium Information 2 credits2KE. Stern, H.‑D. Daniel, D. Helbing, C. Hölscher, B. Rütsche, R. Schubert, C. Stadtfeld
AbstractThis colloquium offers an opportunity for students to discuss their ongoing research and scientific ideas in the behavioral sciences, both at the micro- and macro-levels of cognitive, behavioral and social science. It also offers an opportunity for students from other disciplines to discuss their research ideas in relation to behavioral science. The colloquium also features invited research talks.
ObjectiveStudents know and can apply autonomously up-to-date investigation methods and techniques in the behavioral sciences. They achieve the ability to develop their own ideas in the field and to communicate their ideas in oral presentations and in written papers. The credits will be obtained by a written report of approximately 10 pages.
ContentThis colloquium offers an opportunity for students to discuss their ongoing research and scientific ideas in the behavioral sciences, both at the micro- and macro-levels of cognitive, behavioral and social science. It also offers an opportunity for students from other disciplines to discuss their ideas in so far as they have some relation to behavioral science. The possible research areas are wide and may include theoretical as well as empirical approaches in Social Psychology and Research on Higher Education, Sociology, Modeling and Simulation in Sociology, Decision Theory and Behavioral Game Theory, Economics, Research on Learning and Instruction, Cognitive Psychology and Cognitive Science. Ideally the students (from Bachelor, Master, Ph.D. and Post-Doc programs) have started to start work on their thesis or on any other term paper.
Course credit can be obtained either based on a talk in the colloquium plus a written essay, or by writing an essay about a topic related to one of the other talks in the course. Students interested in giving a talk should contact the course organizers (Rütsche, Stern) before the first session of the semester. Priority will be given to advanced / doctoral students for oral presentations. The course credits will be obtained by a written report of approximately 10 pages. The colloquium also serves as a venue for invited talks by researchers from other universities and institutions related to behavioral and social sciences.