Andreas Wenger: Catalogue data in Spring Semester 2016

Name Prof. Dr. Andreas Wenger
FieldInternational and Swiss Security Policy
Address
Schweiz.- u. Int. Sicherheitspol.
ETH Zürich, IFW C 48.2
Haldeneggsteig 4
8092 Zürich
SWITZERLAND
Award: The Golden Owl
Telephone+41 44 632 59 10
Fax+41 44 632 19 41
E-mailwenger@sipo.gess.ethz.ch
DepartmentHumanities, Social and Political Sciences
RelationshipFull Professor

NumberTitleECTSHoursLecturers
853-0058-00LSwiss Foreign and Security Politics Since 1945 Restricted registration - show details
Only for Public Policy BA and DAS in Military Sciences.
4 credits2V + 1UA. Wenger
AbstractThis course provides students with an overview of the main features of Swiss foreign and security policy since 1945. The focus is on the emergence and development of security policy strategies and instruments in a historical context. Using primary and secondary source texts as a basis, selected topics are analyzed and discussed in tutorials.
ObjectiveThe participants have a solid overview of the evolution of Swiss foreign and security policy since 1945.
ContentThe first part of the lecture clarifies the term “security” and analyzes the change of its meaning in politics and academia over time. The focus of the second part is on the development of Swiss security policy since 1945. We will look at the different concepts of security policy, which range from “total defense” to “cooperative security”. We then will analyze the gap between planning and execution, focusing on the two key developments of security policy, that is foreign policy and armed forces.
The tutorials help to deepen the understanding of key aspects of Swiss foreign and security policy-making. We will read and discuss a number of key (primary and secondary) sources.
LiteratureMandatory reading: Spillman, Kurt R., Andreas Wenger, Christoph Breitenmoser and Marcel Gerber. Schweizer Sicherheitspolitik seit 1945: Zwischen Autonomie und Kooperation. Zürich: Verlag neue Zürcher Zeitung, 2001.
The book is out of print, students can access the text in the virtual class room.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe lecture is supported by a virtual class room. If you have questions concerning the lecture, please contact Lukas Meyer, lukas.meyer@sipo.gess.ethz.ch.
853-0058-01LSwiss Foreign and Security Politics Since 1945 (without Tutorial)2 credits2VA. Wenger
AbstractThis course provides students with an overview of the main features of Swiss foreign and security policy since 1945. The focus is on the emergence and development of security policy strategies and instruments in a historical context.
ObjectiveThe participants have a solid overview of the evolution of Swiss foreign and security policy since 1945.
ContentThe first part of the lecture clarifies the term “security” and analyzes the change of its meaning in politics and academia over time. The focus of the second part is on the development of Swiss security policy since 1945. We will look at the different concepts of security policy, which range from “total defense” to cooperative security”. We then will analyze the gap between planning and execution, focusing on the two key developments of security policy, that is foreign policy and armed forces.
LiteratureMandatory reading: Spillman, Kurt R., Andreas Wenger, Christoph Breitenmoser and Marcel Gerber.
Schweizer Sicherheitspolitik seit 1945: Zwischen Autonomie und Kooperation. Zürich: Verlag neue Zürcher
Zeitung, 2001.

The book is out of print, students can access the text in the virtual class room.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe lecture is supported by a virtual class room. If you have questions concerning the lecture, please
contact Prof. A. Wenger, wenger@sipo.gess.ethz.ch, 044 632 59 10.
853-0322-00LAdvanced Course I (Seminar) Restricted registration - show details
Only for Public Policy BA
4 credits3SA. Wenger, S. Pfister, T. Szvircsev Tresch
AbstractIn this double-semester course students write an academic text at an advanced level on a topic in international relations. In the first part of the course, using a set text (reader), students devise their own research topic and create a research design. In the second part, they write a term paper and present and discuss their findings in the group.
ObjectiveThe goal of this double-semester course, which is divided up into several groups, consists of working out a research question in the field of International Relations, finding corresponding literature, writing a scientific term paper and presenting it in the group
ContentIm ersten Teil der Veranstaltung geht es anhand der Lektüre und der Diskussion ausgewählter Fachliteratur um die Einarbeitung in die Thematik des Seminars. Auf dieser Basis wird ein Research Design erarbeitet. Zusätzlich soll auf methodische Probleme und Schwierigkeiten eingegangen werden. Im zweiten Teil verfassen die Studierenden ihre Seminararbeit und präsentieren die Ergebnisse im Plenum.
857-0053-00LThe Concept of Risk in International Relations and Security Restricted registration - show details
Does not take place this semester.
The class will only take place with a minimum of 5 students and is limited to ca. 15 participants. MACIS students are given priority.
8 credits2SA. Wenger
AbstractSince the Cold War, risk methods and risk tools are having considerable impact on how different actors conceptualize and handle public security challenges, crystallizing into state action based on a multiplicity of unknown or potential dangers. This research seminar critically engages with the rise of "risk" as a 'new' concept in international relations, looking at influences, and impacts.
ObjectiveThe aim of the course is to promote a critical engagement with contemporary literature on risk in security studies and to apply this to contemporary developments in world politics. The requirements for the course include thorough reading of all assigned texts and active participation in class, several response papers, and one 25-40 page research paper. The required readings for each week will be made available online on the Moodle platform.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe class will only take place with a minimum of 5 students and is limited to ca. 15 participants. MACIS students are given priority. Instead of weekly sessions, the seminar may also be thought as a compact course, depending on the number of registered participants.
860-0017-00LArgumentation and Science Communication Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 10.

MSc students, PhD students and postdocs with a science and technology background have priority.
6 credits3GA. Wenger, C. J. Baumberger, M. Dunn Cavelty, G. Hirsch Hadorn, U. Jasper, R. Knutti
AbstractAnalyzing and communicating the aims and ethical implications of scientific research is an essential element at the intersection of science, technology and policy making. This course is split into two modules which focus (1) on arguing about ethical aspects and scientific uncertainties of policies, and (2) on communicating scientific results to policy-makers and the wider public.
ObjectiveStudents learn to consider uncertainties in inferences from computer simulation results to real-world policy problems and acquire an understanding of ethical positions and arguments concerning values, justice and risks related to policies. They learn how to analyze the particular prerequisites for the successful dissemination of scientific results to policy-makers and the wider public.
ContentAnalyzing and communicating the aims and ethical implications of scientific research is an essential element at the intersection of science, technology and policy making. In the first module of this course, we will provide a framework for considering uncertainties in inferences from computer simulation results to real-world policy problems. Moreover, we will introduce and discuss ethical positions and arguments concerning values, justice and risks related to policies. Subsequently, we will learn how to clarify concepts as well as how to identify, reconstruct and evaluate arguments and complex argumentations. In the second module, we will analyze the particular prerequisites for the successful dissemination of scientific results to policy-makers and the wider public. To get a better understanding of the expectations and needs of different target groups we will invite guest speakers and professionals from both the media and the policy world to share their experiences and discuss common problems. The final part of this course consists of practical applications and exercises. Proceeding in a 'draft/revise/submit'-manner, students will have to present a scientific project (possibly linked to a case study) in two different formats (e.g. newspaper contribution and policy brief). Faculty will supervise the writing process and provide reviews and comments on drafts (in collaboration with ETHZ Hochschulkommunikation and the Language Center).
Schedule:
W1: Introduction
W2: Computer models and simulations: How do we learn about real-world problems by models and computer simulations? What can we infer from their results for policy advice?
W3: Values: What are the implications of basic distinctions in value theory such as intrinsic vs extrinsic/instrumental values, anthropocentric vs non-anthropocentric values, and value monism vs value pluralism for policy assessments?
W4: Justice: What are the ethical arguments for and against different conceptions of intra- and intergenerational justice, such as egalitarianism, grandfathering, polluter or beneficiary pays principle, and capability approaches?
W5: Risks: What are permissible risks from the perspective of different ethical theories, such as utilitarianism, contractualism, deontological and right-based theories?
W6: Concepts and arguments: Clarification of ambiguous and vague concepts, identification and reconstruction of arguments, types of theoretical and practical arguments
W7: Concepts and arguments: Criteria for good arguments, typical fallacies, use of arguments in discussions
W8: The science of science communication: Basic insights from communication theory
W9: Different Audiences, Different Formats: What are the particular prerequisites for the successful dissemination of scientific results to policy-makers? What are the writing and presentation skills needed?
W10: What are the particular prerequisites for communicating with the wider public? The dos and don'ts of media interaction. What are the benefits and challenges of social media?
W11: Study week: Students work on their two 'praxis projects' and submit two drafts.
W12: Supervision and Revision
W13: Supervision and Revision
W14: Wrap-up: Effectively communicating science-related topics and their political and ethical implications to a non-expert audience.
Lecture notesPapers are made available for the participants of this course.
LiteraturePapers are made available for the participants of this course.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe total number of students is 10. MSc students, PhD students and postdocs with a science and technology background have priority; weekly meetings of 3 hours during FS 2016, 6 ETCS (39 contact hours + 141 hours for preparations and exercises); grading based on the exercises on a 1-6 point scale, the parts contribute in the following way: argumentation 50%, science communication 50%.