Autumn Semester 2020 takes place in a mixed form of online and classroom teaching.
Please read the published information on the individual courses carefully.

Thomas Bernauer: Catalogue data in Autumn Semester 2016

Name Prof. Dr. Thomas Bernauer
FieldInternationale Beziehungen
Address
CIS
ETH Zürich, IFW C 45.1
Haldeneggsteig 4
8092 Zürich
SWITZERLAND
Telephone+41 44 632 67 71
E-mailthbe0520@ethz.ch
DepartmentHumanities, Social and Political Sciences
RelationshipFull Professor

NumberTitleECTSHoursLecturers
851-0594-00LInternational Environmental Politics
Particularly suitable for students of D-ITET, D-USYS
3 credits2VT. Bernauer
AbstractThis course focuses on the conditions under which cooperation in international environmental politics emerges and the conditions under which such cooperation and the respective public policies are effective and/or efficient.
ObjectiveThe objectives of this course are to (1) gain an overview of relevant questions in the area of international environmental politics from a social sciences viewpoint; (2) learn how to identify interesting/innovative questions concerning this policy area and how to answer them in a methodologically sophisticated way; (3) gain an overview of important global and regional environmental problems.
ContentThis course deals with how and why international cooperation in environmental politics emerges, and under what circumstances such cooperation is effective and efficient. Based on theories of international political economy and theories of government regulation various examples of international environmental politics are discussed: the management of international water resources, the problem of unsafe nuclear power plants in eastern Europe, political responses to global warming, the protection of the stratospheric ozone layer, the reduction of long-range transboundary air pollution in Europe, the prevention of pollution of the oceans, etc.

The course is open to all ETH students. Participation does not require previous coursework in the social sciences.

After passing an end-of-semester test (requirement: grade 4.0 or higher) students will receive 3 ECTS credit points. The workload is around 90 hours (meetings, reading assignments, preparation of test).

Visiting students (e.g., from the University of Zurich) are subject to the same conditions. Registration of visiting students in the web-based system of ETH is compulsory.
Lecture notesAssigned reading materials and slides will be available at http://www.ib.ethz.ch/teaching.html (select link 'Registered students, please click here for course materials' at top of that page). Log in with your nethz name and password. Questions concerning access to course materials can be addressed to Mike Hudecheck (Mike Hudecheck <michaehu@student.ethz.ch>). All assigned papers must be read ahead of the respective meeting. Following the course on the basis of on-line slides and papers alone is not sufficient. Physical presence in the classroom is essential. Many books and journals covering international environmental policy issues can be found at the D-GESS library at the IFW building, Haldeneggsteig 4, B-floor, or in the library of D-USYS.
LiteratureAssigned reading materials and slides will be available at http://www.ib.ethz.ch/teaching.html (select link 'Registered students, please click here for course materials' at top of that page). Log in with your nethz name and password. Questions concerning access to course materials can be addressed to Mike Hudecheck (Mike Hudecheck <michaehu@student.ethz.ch>).
Prerequisites / NoticeNone
860-0001-00LPublic Institutions and Policy-Making Processes Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 25.
Priority for Science, Technology, and Policy MSc students.
3 credits3GT. Bernauer, S. Bechtold, F. Schimmelfennig
AbstractStudents acquire the contextual knowledge for analyzing public policies. They learn why and how public policies and laws are developed, designed, and implemented at national and international levels, and what challenges arise in this regard.
ObjectivePublic policies result from decision-making processes that take place within formal institutions of the state (parliament, government, public administration, courts). That is, policies are shaped by the characteristics of decision-making processes and the characteristics of public institutions and related actors (e.g. interest groups). In this course, students acquire the contextual knowledge for analyzing public policies. They learn why and how public policies and laws are developed, designed, and implemented at national and international levels, and what challenges arise in this regard. The course is organized in three modules. The first module (Stefan Bechtold) examines basic concepts and the role of law, law-making, and law enforcement in modern societies. The second module (Thomas Bernauer) deals with the functioning of legislatures, governments, and interest groups. The third module (Frank Schimmelfennig) focuses on the European Union and international organisations.
ContentSchedule (for up-to-date information, see the syllabus that will be distributed to participants electronically):
W1: Bechtold, Bernauer: Introduction
How are laws created and interpreted? How are they enforced?
W2: Bechtold: Why do we need laws and why do people and firms usually obey the law? What are possible goals of legal systems? What is the relationship between laws, social norms, and moral values?
W3: Bechtold: What role does scientific evidence play in the creation and enforcement of the law? How does the law deal with non-quantifiable factors or incommensurable values?
W4: no class
W5: Bernauer: How are parliaments (legislatures) elected, how do they work, and how do their characteristics and processes affect policy-making?
W6: Bernauer: Why do forms of government differ and how does this affect policy-making? Why and in what respect are public administrations efficient/effective, and why sometimes not?
W7: Bernauer: How do interest groups and social movements affect policy-making.
W8: Study week
W9: Schimmelfennig: Governance beyond the state: why and how states create international institutions.
W10: Schimmelfennig: International organizations and regimes: case studies of global governance.
W11: Schimmelfennig: Institutions and policy-making in the European Union.
W12: Schimmelfennig: International organizations and policy diffusion.
W13: End-of-semester exam

An add-on module to this course (3 ECTS) involves an essay. This part of the course is accessible only to ISTP MSc students and requires enrollement in the main course (3 ECTS). ISTP MSc students must enrol in both parts. Other students can only enrol in the main course.
3rd week of January: deadline for review essay
Lecture notesReading materials will be distributed electronically to the students when the semester starts.
LiteratureBaylis, John, Steve Smith, and Patricia Owens (2014): The Globalization of World Politics. An Introduction to International Relations. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Caramani, Daniele (ed.) (2014): Comparative Politics. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

European Court of Justice (2013): ITV Broadcasting Ltd. and Others v. TV Catch Up Ltd., Case C-607/11, March 7, 2013, EU:C:2013:147.

Federal Communications Commission (2015): Protecting and Promoting the Open Internet, 80 Federal Register 19738-19847.

Gilardi, Fabrizio (2012): Transnational Diffusion: Norms, Ideas, and Policies, in Carlsnaes, Walter, Thomas Risse and Beth Simmons, Handbook of International Relations, 2nd Edition, London: Sage, pp. 453-477.

Hage, Jaap and Bram Akkermans (eds.) (2014): Introduction to Law, Heidelberg: Springer, available as an ebook at ETH library.

Jolls, Christine (2013): Product Warnings, Debiasing, and Free Speech: The Case of Tobacco Regulation, Journal of Institutional and Theoretical Economics 169: 53-78.

Lelieveldt, Herman and Sebastiaan Princen (2011): The Politics of European Union. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Lessig, Lawrence (2006): Code and Other Laws of Cyberspace, Version 2.0, New York: Basic Books. Available at http://codev2.cc/download+remix/Lessig-Codev2.pdf.

Schimmelfennig, Frank and Ulrich Sedelmeier (2004): Governance by Conditionality: EU Rule Transfer to the Candidate Countries of Central and Eastern Europe, in: Journal of European Public Policy 11(4): 669-687.

Shipan, Charles V. and Craig Volden (2012): Policy Diffusion: Seven Lessons for Scholars and Practitioners. Public Administration Review 72(6): 788-796.

Sunstein, Cass R. (2014): The Limits of Quantification, California Law Review 102: 1369-1422.

Thaler, Richard H. and Cass R. Sunstein (2003): Libertarian Paternalism. American Economic Review: Papers & Proceedings 93: 175-179.

U.S. Supreme Court (2014): American Broadcasting Companies, Inc. v. Aereo, Inc., 134 S.Ct. 2498.
Prerequisites / NoticeThis is a Master level course. The course is capped at 25 students, with ISTP Master students having priority.
860-0001-01LPublic Institutions and Policy-Making Processes; Research Paper Restricted registration - show details
Only for Science, Technology, and Policy MSc.

Prerequisite: you have to be enrolled in 860-0001-00L during the same semester.
3 credits3AT. Bernauer, S. Bechtold, F. Schimmelfennig
AbstractThis is an add-on module to the course: 860-0001-00L. It focuses on students writing an essay on an issue covered by the main course 860-0001-00L.
ObjectiveStudents learn how to write an essay on a policy issue they select.
ContentStudents learn how to write an essay on a policy issue they select.
Lecture notesSee 860-0001-00L
LiteratureSee 860-0001-00L
Prerequisites / NoticeAccess only for ISTP MSc students also enrolled in 860-0001-00L
860-0003-00LCornerstone Science, Technology, and Policy Restricted registration - show details
Only for Science, Technology, and Policy MSc.
2 credits2ST. Bernauer, R. S. Abhari
AbstractThis course introduces students to the MSc program in two ways. First, it provides a general introduction to the study of STP. Second, it exposes students to a variety of complex policy problems and ways and means of coming up with proposals for and assessments of policy options.
ObjectiveThis course introduces students to the MSc program in two ways. First, it provides a general introduction to the study of STP. Second, it exposes students to a variety of complex policy problems and ways and means of coming up with proposals for and assessments of policy options.
ContentDay 1: Introduction to the study of Science, Technology and Policy / getting to know each other, social event
Day 2: Knowledge assessment in areas marked by controversy over scientific evidence
Day 3: Challenges of urban development / Energy transition and sustainable mobility
Day 4: Mitigating and adapting to climate change / Managing international water resources
Day 5: Implications of digital society / Policy planning exercise
Prerequisites / NoticeReserved for the ISTP's Master students
860-0004-00LBridging Science, Technology, and Policy Restricted registration - show details
Only for Science, Technology, and Policy MSc.
3 credits2SR. S. Abhari, T. Bernauer
AbstractThis course focuses on technological innovations from the beginning of humanity through the industrial revolution up until today. It provides students with a deeper understanding of the factors that drive technological innovations, and the roles government policies, society, science, and industry play in this regard.
ObjectiveThis course picks up on the ISTP Cornerstone Science, Technology and Policy course and goes into greater depth on issues covered in that course, as well as additional issues where science and technology are among the causes of societal challenges but can also help in finding solutions.
ContentWeek 1: no class because of ISTP Cornerstone Science, Technology and Policy course
Week 2: technology & society in historical perspective - technological innovations up to the industrial revolution
Week 3: technology & society in historical perspective - technological innovations during the industrial revolution - engines & electricity
Week 4: technology & society in historical perspective - from the industrial revolution to modernity - mobility and transport (railroads, ships, cars, airplanes, space)
Week 5: food production: the green revolutions.
Week 6: microelectronics, computing & the internet
Week 7: life sciences: pharmaceuticals & diagnostic technology
Week 8: energy: primary fuels, renewables, networks
Week 9: automation: self-driving cars & trains, drones
Week 10: communication & Big Data: semiconductors and software
Week 11: military & security issues associated with technological innovation
Week 12: possible futures (1): nuclear fusion, geoengineering
Week 13: possible Future (2): information, communication, robotics, synthetic biology, nanotech, quantum computing
Lecture notesCourse materials will be given to the students prior to the start of each class
860-0005-00LColloquium Science, Technology, and Policy (HS) Restricted registration - show details
Students of Science, Technology, and Policy MSc have priority.
1 credit2KT. Bernauer, R. S. Abhari
AbstractPresentations by invited guest speakers from academia and practice/policy. Students are assigned to play a leading role in the discussion and write a report on the respective event.
ObjectivePresentations by invited guest speakers from academia and practice/policy. Students are assigned to play a leading role in the discussion and write a report on the respective event.
ContentSee program on the ISTP website: http://www.istp.ethz.ch/news-and-events/events.html
Prerequisites / Noticeopen to anyone from ETH