Autumn Semester 2020 takes place in a mixed form of online and classroom teaching.
Please read the published information on the individual courses carefully.

Emo Welzl: Catalogue data in Autumn Semester 2018

Name Prof. Dr. Emo Welzl
FieldInformatik
Address
Inst. f. Theoretische Informatik
ETH Zürich, CAB G 39.2
Universitätstrasse 6
8092 Zürich
SWITZERLAND
Telephone+41 44 632 73 70
Fax+41 44 632 10 63
E-mailemo@inf.ethz.ch
URLhttp://www.inf.ethz.ch/personal/emo/
DepartmentComputer Science
RelationshipFull Professor

NumberTitleECTSHoursLecturers
252-0209-00LAlgorithms, Probability, and Computing Information 8 credits4V + 2U + 1AE. Welzl, M. Ghaffari, A. Steger, D. Steurer, P. Widmayer
AbstractAdvanced design and analysis methods for algorithms and data structures: Random(ized) Search Trees, Point Location, Minimum Cut, Linear Programming, Randomized Algebraic Algorithms (matchings), Probabilistically Checkable Proofs (introduction).
ObjectiveStudying and understanding of fundamental advanced concepts in algorithms, data structures and complexity theory.
Lecture notesWill be handed out.
LiteratureIntroduction to Algorithms by T. H. Cormen, C. E. Leiserson, R. L. Rivest;
Randomized Algorithms by R. Motwani und P. Raghavan;
Computational Geometry - Algorithms and Applications by M. de Berg, M. van Kreveld, M. Overmars, O. Schwarzkopf.
252-1425-00LGeometry: Combinatorics and Algorithms Information 6 credits2V + 2U + 1AE. Welzl, L. F. Barba Flores, M. Hoffmann
AbstractGeometric structures are useful in many areas, and there is a need to understand their structural properties, and to work with them algorithmically. The lecture addresses theoretical foundations concerning geometric structures. Central objects of interest are triangulations. We study combinatorial (Does a certain object exist?) and algorithmic questions (Can we find a certain object efficiently?)
ObjectiveThe goal is to make students familiar with fundamental concepts, techniques and results in combinatorial and computational geometry, so as to enable them to model, analyze, and solve theoretical and practical problems in the area and in various application domains.
In particular, we want to prepare students for conducting independent research, for instance, within the scope of a thesis project.
ContentPlanar and geometric graphs, embeddings and their representation (Whitney's Theorem, canonical orderings, DCEL), polygon triangulations and the art gallery theorem, convexity in R^d, planar convex hull algorithms (Jarvis Wrap, Graham Scan, Chan's Algorithm), point set triangulations, Delaunay triangulations (Lawson flips, lifting map, randomized incremental construction), Voronoi diagrams, the Crossing Lemma and incidence bounds, line arrangements (duality, Zone Theorem, ham-sandwich cuts), 3-SUM hardness, counting planar triangulations.
Lecture notesyes
LiteratureMark de Berg, Marc van Kreveld, Mark Overmars, Otfried Cheong, Computational Geometry: Algorithms and Applications, Springer, 3rd ed., 2008.
Satyan Devadoss, Joseph O'Rourke, Discrete and Computational Geometry, Princeton University Press, 2011.
Stefan Felsner, Geometric Graphs and Arrangements: Some Chapters from Combinatorial Geometry, Teubner, 2004.
Jiri Matousek, Lectures on Discrete Geometry, Springer, 2002.
Takao Nishizeki, Md. Saidur Rahman, Planar Graph Drawing, World Scientific, 2004.
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites: The course assumes basic knowledge of discrete mathematics and algorithms, as supplied in the first semesters of Bachelor Studies at ETH.
Outlook: In the following spring semester there is a seminar "Geometry: Combinatorics and Algorithms" that builds on this course. There are ample possibilities for Semester-, Bachelor- and Master Thesis projects in the area.
252-4202-00LSeminar in Theoretical Computer Science Information
The deadline for deregistering expires at the end of the second week of the semester. Students who are still registered after that date, but do not attend the seminar, will officially fail the seminar.
2 credits2SE. Welzl, B. Gärtner, M. Hoffmann, J. Lengler, A. Steger, B. Sudakov
AbstractPresentation of recent publications in theoretical computer science, including results by diploma, masters and doctoral candidates.
ObjectiveThe goal is to introduce students to current research, and to enable them to read, understand, and present scientific papers.
263-0006-00LAlgorithms Lab
Only for master students, otherwise a special permission by the student administration of D-INFK is required.
8 credits4P + 3AA. Steger, E. Welzl, P. Widmayer
AbstractStudents learn how to solve algorithmic problems given by a textual description (understanding problem setting, finding appropriate modeling, choosing suitable algorithms, and implementing them). Knowledge of basic algorithms and data structures is assumed; more advanced material and usage of standard libraries for combinatorial algorithms are introduced in tutorials.
ObjectiveThe objective of this course is to learn how to solve algorithmic problems given by a textual description. This includes appropriate problem modeling, choice of suitable (combinatorial) algorithms, and implementing them (using C/C++, STL, CGAL, and BGL).
LiteratureT. Cormen, C. Leiserson, R. Rivest: Introduction to Algorithms, MIT Press, 1990.
J. Hromkovic, Teubner: Theoretische Informatik, Springer, 2004 (English: Theoretical Computer Science, Springer 2003).
J. Kleinberg, É. Tardos: Algorithm Design, Addison Wesley, 2006.
H. R. Lewis, C. H. Papadimitriou: Elements of the Theory of Computation, Prentice Hall, 1998.
T. Ottmann, P. Widmayer: Algorithmen und Datenstrukturen, Spektrum, 2012.
R. Sedgewick: Algorithms in C++: Graph Algorithms, Addison-Wesley, 2001.