Fabio Gramazio: Katalogdaten im Herbstsemester 2017

NameHerr Prof. Fabio Gramazio
LehrgebietArchitektur und Digitale Fabrikation
Adresse
Architektur & Digitale Fabrikation
ETH Zürich, HIB E 43
Stefano-Franscini-Platz 1
8093 Zürich
SWITZERLAND
Fax+41 44 633 10 50
E-Mailgramazio@arch.ethz.ch
DepartementArchitektur
BeziehungOrdentlicher Professor

NummerTitelECTSUmfangDozierende
051-1225-17LIntegrated Discipline Architecture and Digital Fabrication (F.Gramazio/M.Kohler) Information Belegung eingeschränkt - Details anzeigen 3 KP2UF. Gramazio, M. Kohler
KurzbeschreibungThe Integrated Discipline deals with the interrelation between material and algorithmic design. The direct control of production data opens up new possibilities for design strategies that are exempt from the limitations of standard CAD software. The Integration of process, function and design allows for a new approach to the production of architecture.
LernzielData and material, programming and construction are interwoven. This synthesis is enabled by the techniques of digital fabrication, which allows the architect to control the manufacturing process through design data. Material is thus enriched by information; material becomes “informed.” In the future, architects’ ideas will permeate the fabrication process in its entirety. This new situation transforms the possibilities and thus the professional scope of the architect.
InhaltWe use the term digital materiality to describe an emergent transformation in the expression of architecture. Materiality is increasingly being enriched with digital characteristics, which substantially affect architecture’s physis. Digital materiality evolves through the interplay between digital and material processes in design and construction. The synthesis of two seemingly distinct worlds – the digital and the material – generates new, self-evident realities. Data and material, programming and construction are interwoven. This synthesis is enabled by the techniques of digital fabrication, which allows the architect to control the manufacturing process through design data. Material is thus enriched by information; material becomes “informed.” In the future, architects’ ideas will permeate the fabrication process in its entirety. This new situation transforms the possibilities and thus the professional scope of the architect.
052-1127-17LArchitectural Design V-IX: Robotic Landscapes (Girot/Gramazio/Kohler Research) Information
Please register (www.mystudies.ethz.ch) only after the internal enrolment for the design classes (see http://www.einschreibung.arch.ethz.ch/design.php).

Project grading at semester end is based on the list of enrolments on Friday 3rd November 2017, 24:00 h (valuation date) only.
Ultimate deadline to unsubscribe or enroll for the studio is Friday 3rd November 2017, 24:00 h.
14 KP16UC. Girot, F. Gramazio
KurzbeschreibungThe HS 2017 Robotic Landscapes Design Studio is a collaboration between the Chair of Christophe Girot and Gramazio Kohler Research. It will explore the robotic manipulation of local topography to create a new linear landscape park and sound barrier along the A2 in the lower Valle Riviera, Ticino.
LernzielThe design work will follow the precepts of a site-specific approach with an emphasis on precise terrain modelling. There will be a conceptual approach to this studio as well as a pragmatic approach to problem solving. The studio methodology will combine analogue design tools with digital design tools and fabrication. Workshops on soil textures, robotic fabrication and physical landscape modeling (cnc) will guide the students in form finding methods. This studio will give students the opportunity to develop their skills in the area of large scale landscape architecture and robotic fabrication.
InhaltInnovative topological modelling methods will be used to study the shaping of formless soil material with robotic fabrication processes. The goal of the studio is to define a new landscape topology with regard to acoustic performance through robotic fabrication. Students are asked to develop tangible and precise landscape structures at various stages, phases, and scales over time.
SkriptBooklet and reader will be provided at the introduction.

For further information see:
http://girot.arch.ethz.ch/
Voraussetzungen / Besonderes- Introduction: Tuesday 19.9.2017, HIB Open Space 2, 10:00h
- The number of participants is limited to 18 students
- The studio includes a site visit trip
- The studio includes "Integrierte Disziplin Planung"
- The studio space is ETH Hönggerberg HIL C40.1 / C40.7
- The studio includes individual and team work
- Language of instruction is English; Assistance in English and German
063-0621-17LArchitecture and Digital Fabrication (Thesis Elective) Information
Enrollment only for Master students of the 2011 curriculum!
6 KP11AF. Gramazio, M. Kohler
KurzbeschreibungAdvance in technology revolutionizes design and fabrication processes within architecture. Digital fabrication allows immediate production from design data. The architect as author of these data takes a key role in this development.
This course focuses on strategies for architectural production by means of algorithmic design tools and computer controlled fabrication methods.
LernzielThe goal of the „Wahlfacharbeit“ is the in depth analysis of a topic in the field of digital design and fabrication. The students should develop a personal, algorithmic design system till fabrication. A theoretic placement of the work within the current research discourse is desirable.
InhaltWe use the term digital materiality to describe an emergent transformation in the expression of architecture. Materiality is increasingly being enriched with digital characteristics, which substantially affect architecture’s physis. Digital materiality evolves through the interplay between digital and material processes in design and construction. The synthesis of two seemingly distinct worlds – the digital and the material – generates new, self-evident realities. Data and material, programming and construction are interwoven. This synthesis is enabled by the techniques of digital fabrication, which allows the architect to control the manufacturing process through design data. Material is thus enriched by information; material becomes “informed.” In the future, architects’ ideas will permeate the fabrication process in its entirety. This new situation transforms the possibilities and thus the professional scope of the architect.
SkriptThe script is provided by the teaching chair and can be purchased the day the elective course starts.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesThe elective thesis HS15 will be held as part of the current edition of the Swisspearl® Summerschool, 31.08. to 11.09.2015, thus on site, in the Eternit production facilities in Payerne! Everybody can participate in the Summerschool, enrolment details will be given within due time on the chair's webpage.
069-0001-00LDigital Foundations Information Belegung eingeschränkt - Details anzeigen
Nur für MAS in Architecture and Digital Fabrication.
17 KP24GB. Dillenburger, F. Gramazio, M. Kohler
KurzbeschreibungDigital Foundations introduces students to information technology in architecture, to computational design and how robotic fabrication processes as well as 3D printing technologies are used to translate the computational design models into physical objects and building components.
LernzielStudents learn basic programming paradigms such as control structures and object oriented programming, the foundations of computational geometry and explore generative form-finding. Using Python as a main programming language within the frameworks of Processing, Rhino and Grasshopper, students learn to translate design thinking into computational algorithms. Furthermore, students learn about data preparation and toolpath creation for 3D printing (predominantly binder jet-printing and fused-deposition-modelling), and familiarise themselves with various mechatronic setups, materials and control-strategies of additive manufacturing.
Students are taught the basic principles of working with industrial robotic arms in the field of architecture. Students practice different concepts of robotic control, which enables them to execute basic routines. They are able to write their own programmes and directly control the robotic set-up using UR-Script and custom Python modules. Through multiple exercises, students learn how to design and robotically build small-scale spatial structures exhibiting the potential of robotic fabrication processes. Additionally, they employ simple feedback loops for improving the accuracy of the fabrication process and as design-drivers.
701-0901-00LETH Week 2017: Manufacturing the Future Belegung eingeschränkt - Details anzeigen
All ETH Bachelor¿s, Master¿s and exchange students can take part in the ETH week. No prior knowledge is required
1 KP3SR. Knutti, C. Bratrich, S. Brusoni, I. Burgert, A. Cabello Llamas, F. Gramazio, G. Grote, A. Krause, M. Meboldt, A. R. Studart, A. Vaterlaus
KurzbeschreibungThe ETH Week is an innovative one-week course designed to foster critical thinking and creative learning. Students from all departments as well as professors and external experts will work together in interdisciplinary teams. They will develop interventions that could play a role in solving some of our most pressing global challenges. In 2017, ETH Week will focus on the topic of manufacturing.
Lernziel- Domain specific knowledge: Students have immersed knowledge about a certain complex, societal topic which will be selected every year. They understand the complex system context of the current topic, by comprehending its scientific, technical, political, social, ecological and economic perspectives.

- Analytical skills: The ETH Week participants are able to structure complex problems systematically using selected methods. They are able to acquire further knowledge and to critically analyze the knowledge in interdisciplinary groups and with experts and the help of team tutors.

- Design skills: The students are able to use their knowledge and skills to develop concrete approaches for problem solving and decision making to a selected problem statement, critically reflect these approaches, assess their feasibility, to transfer them into a concrete form (physical model, prototypes, strategy paper, etc.) and to present this work in a creative way (role-plays, videos, exhibitions, etc.).

- Self-competence: The students are able to plan their work effectively, efficiently and autonomously. By considering approaches from different disciplines they are able to make a judgment and form a personal opinion. In exchange with non-academic partners from business, politics, administration, nongovernmental organizations and media they are able to communicate appropriately, present their results professionally and creatively and convince a critical audience.

- Social competence: The students are able to work in multidisciplinary teams, i.e. they can reflect critically their own discipline, debate with students from other disciplines and experts in a critical-constructive and respectful way and can relate their own positions to different intellectual approaches. They can assess how far they are able to actively make a contribution to society by using their personal and professional talents and skills and as "Change Agents".
InhaltThe week is mainly about problem solving and design thinking applied to the complex manufacturing world. During ETH Week students will have the opportunity to work in small interdisciplinary groups, allowing them to critically analyze both their own approaches and those of other disciplines, and to integrate these into their work.

While deepening their knowledge about how manufacturing works, students will be introduced to various methods and tools for generating creative ideas and understand how different people are affected by each part of the system. In addition to lectures and literature, students will acquire knowledge via excursions into the real world, empirical observations, and conversations with researchers and experts.

A key attribute of the ETH Week is that students are expected to find their own problem, rather than just solve the problem that has been handed to them.

Therefore, the first three days of the week will concentrate on identifying a problem the individual teams will work on, while the last two days are focused on generating solutions and communicating the team's ideas.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesNo prerequisites. Program is open to Bachelor and Masters from all ETH Departments. All students must apply through a competitive application process at www.ethz.ch/ethweek. Participation is subject to successful selection through this competitive process.