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Tobias Delbrück: Katalogdaten im Herbstsemester 2016

NameHerr Prof. Dr. Tobias Delbrück
Adresse
Institut für Neuroinformatik
ETH Zürich, Y55 G 84
Winterthurerstrasse 190
8057 Zürich
SWITZERLAND
E-Mailtodelbru@ethz.ch
URLhttp://www.ini.uzh.ch/~tobi
DepartementInformationstechnologie und Elektrotechnik
BeziehungTitularprofessor

NummerTitelECTSUmfangDozierende
227-1033-00LNeuromorphic Engineering I Information Belegung eingeschränkt - Details anzeigen
Registration in this class requires the permission of the instructors. Class size will be limited to available lab spots.
Preference is given to students that require this class as part of their major.
6 KP2V + 3UT. Delbrück, G. Indiveri, S.‑C. Liu
KurzbeschreibungThis course covers analog circuits with emphasis on neuromorphic engineering: MOS transistors in CMOS technology, static circuits, dynamic circuits, systems (silicon neuron, silicon retina, silicon cochlea) with an introduction to multi-chip systems. The lectures are accompanied by weekly laboratory sessions.
LernzielUnderstanding of the characteristics of neuromorphic circuit elements.
InhaltNeuromorphic circuits are inspired by the organizing principles of biological neural circuits. Their computational primitives are based on physics of semiconductor devices. Neuromorphic architectures often rely on collective computation in parallel networks. Adaptation, learning and memory are implemented locally within the individual computational elements. Transistors are often operated in weak inversion (below threshold), where they exhibit exponential I-V characteristics and low currents. These properties lead to the feasibility of high-density, low-power implementations of functions that are computationally intensive in other paradigms. Application domains of neuromorphic circuits include silicon retinas and cochleas for machine vision and audition, real-time emulations of networks of biological neurons, and the development of autonomous robotic systems. This course covers devices in CMOS technology (MOS transistor below and above threshold, floating-gate MOS transistor, phototransducers), static circuits (differential pair, current mirror, transconductance amplifiers, etc.), dynamic circuits (linear and nonlinear filters, adaptive circuits), systems (silicon neuron, silicon retina and cochlea) and an introduction to multi-chip systems that communicate events analogous to spikes. The lectures are accompanied by weekly laboratory sessions on the characterization of neuromorphic circuits, from elementary devices to systems.
LiteraturS.-C. Liu et al.: Analog VLSI Circuits and Principles; various publications.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesParticular: The course is highly recommended for those who intend to take the spring semester course 'Neuromorphic Engineering II', that teaches the conception, simulation, and physical layout of such circuits with chip design tools.

Prerequisites: Background in basics of semiconductor physics helpful, but not required.
227-1039-00LBasics of Instrumentation, Measurement, and Analysis (University of Zurich) Belegung eingeschränkt - Details anzeigen
No enrolment to this course at ETH Zurich. Book the corresponding module directly at UZH.
UZH Module Code: INI502

Mind the enrolment deadlines at UZH:
http://www.uzh.ch/studies/application/mobilitaet_en.html

Registration in this class requires the permission of the instructors. Class size will be limited to available lab spots.
Preference is given to students that require this class as part of their major.
4 KP9VS.‑C. Liu, T. Delbrück, A. Ghosh, R. Hahnloser, G. Indiveri, V. Mante, P. Pyk, W. von der Behrens
KurzbeschreibungExperimental data are always as good as the instrumentation and measurement, but never any better. This course provides the very basics of instrumentation relevant to neurophysiology and neuromorphic engineering, it consists of two parts: a common introductory part involving analog signals and their acquisition (Part I), and a more specialized second part (Part II).
LernzielThe goal of Part I is to provide a general introduction to the signal acquisition process. Students are familiarized with basic lab equipment such as oscilloscopes, function generators, and data acquisition devices. Different electrical signals are generated, visualized, filtered, digitized, and analyzed using Matlab (Mathworks Inc.) or Labview (National Instruments).

In Part II, the students are divided into small groups to work on individual measurement projects according to availability and interest. Students single-handedly solve a measurement task, making use of their basic knowledge acquired in the first part. Various signal sources will be provided.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesFor each part, students must hand in a written report and present a live demonstration of their measurement setup to the respective supervisor. The supervisor of Part I is the teaching assistant, and the supervisor of Part II is task specific. Admission to Part II is conditional on completion of Part I (report + live demonstration).

Reports must contain detailed descriptions of the measurement goal, the measurement procedure, and the measurement outcome. Either confidence or significance of measurements must be provided. Acquisition and analysis software must be documented.