Autumn Semester 2020 takes place in a mixed form of online and classroom teaching.
Please read the published information on the individual courses carefully.

Andreas Vaterlaus: Catalogue data in Autumn Semester 2016

Name Prof. Dr. Andreas Vaterlaus
FieldPhysics and Education
Address
Laboratorium für Festkörperphysik
ETH Zürich, HPZ G 21
John-von-Neumann-Weg 9
8093 Zürich
SWITZERLAND
Award: The Golden Owl
Telephone+41 44 633 65 19
E-mailandreasv@ethz.ch
DepartmentPhysics
RelationshipFull Professor

NumberTitleECTSHoursLecturers
402-0063-00LPhysics II5 credits3V + 1UA. Vaterlaus
AbstractIntroduction to the "way of thinking" and the methodology in Physics, with the help of demonstration experiments. The Chapters treated are Electromagnetism, Refraction and Diffraction of Waves, Elements of Quantum Mechanics with applications to Spectroscopy, Thermodynamics, Phase Transitions, Transport Phenomena. Whenever possible, examples relevant to the students' main field of study are given.
ObjectiveIntroduction to the scientific methodology. The student should develop his/her capability to turn physical observations into mathematical models, and to solve the latter.
ContentElektromagnetismus, Elektromagnetische Wellen, Wellenoptik, Strahlenoptik, Quantenoptik, Quantenmechanik, Thermische Eigenschaften, Transportphänomene, Wärmestrahlung
Lecture notesSkript wird verteilt.
LiteratureFriedhelm Kuypers
Physik für Ingenieure und Naturwissenschaftler
Band 2 Elektrizität, Optik, Wellen
Wiley-VCH, 2012
ISBN 3527411445, 9783527411443

Douglas C. Giancoli
Physik
3. erweiterte Auflage
Pearson Studium

Hans J. Paus
Physik in Experimenten und Beispielen
Carl Hanser Verlag, München, 2002, 1068 S.

Paul A. Tipler
Physik
Spektrum Akademischer Verlag, 1998, 1522 S., ca Fr. 120.-

David Halliday Robert Resnick Jearl Walker
Physik
Wiley-VCH, 2003, 1388 S., Fr. 87.- (bis 31.12.03)

dazu gratis Online Ressourcen (z.B. Simulationen): www.halliday.de
402-0101-00LThe Zurich Physics Colloquium Information 0 credits1KR. Renner, G. Aeppli, C. Anastasiou, N. Beisert, G. Blatter, S. Cantalupo, M. Carollo, C. Degen, G. Dissertori, K. Ensslin, T. Esslinger, J. Faist, M. Gaberdiel, T. K. Gehrmann, G. M. Graf, R. Grange, J. Home, S. Huber, A. Imamoglu, P. Jetzer, S. Johnson, U. Keller, K. S. Kirch, S. Lilly, L. M. Mayer, J. Mesot, B. Moore, D. Pescia, A. Refregier, A. Rubbia, K. Schawinski, T. C. Schulthess, M. Sigrist, M. Troyer, A. Vaterlaus, R. Wallny, A. Wallraff, W. Wegscheider, A. Zheludev, O. Zilberberg
AbstractResearch colloquium
Objective
Prerequisites / NoticeOccasionally, talks may be delivered in German.
402-0526-00LUltrafast Processes in Solids6 credits2V + 1UY. M. Acremann, A. Vaterlaus
AbstractUltrafast processes in solids are of fundamental interest as well as relevant for modern technological applications. The dynamics of the lattice, the electron gas as well as the spin system of a solid are discussed. The focus is on time resolved experiments which provide insight into pico- and femtosecond dynamics.
ObjectiveAfter attending this course you understand the dynamics of essential excitation processes which occur in solids and you have an overview over state of the art experimental techniques used to study fast processes.
Content1. Experimental techniques, an overview

2. Dynamics of the electron gas
2.1 First experiments on electron dynamics and lattice heating
2.2 The finite lifetime of excited states
2.3 Detection of lifetime effects
2.4 Dynamical properties of reactions and adsorbents

3. Dynamics of the lattice
3.1 Phonons
3.2 Non-thermal melting

4. Dynamics of the spin system
4.1 Laser induced ultrafast demagnetization
4.2 Ultrafast spin currents generated by lasers
4.3 Landau-Lifschitz-Dynamics
4.4 Laser induced switching

5. Correlated materials
Lecture noteswill be distributed
Literaturerelevant publications will be cited
Prerequisites / NoticeThe lecture can also be followed by interested non-physics students as basic concepts will be introduced.

This lecture is complementary to the lecture on "ultrafast methods for solid state physics" of the spring semester. Both lectures can be attended independently. The focus of this lecture is on the physical processes whereas the focus of the "ultrafast methods for solid state physics" lecture is on the experimental techniques.
402-0917-00LMentored Work Subject Didactics Physics A Information Restricted registration - show details
Mentored Work Subject Didactics in Physics for TC and Teaching Diploma.
2 credits4AG. Schiltz, A. Vaterlaus, C. Wagner
AbstractIn their mentored work on subject didactics, students put into practice the contents of the subject-didactics lectures and go into these in greater depth. Under supervision, they compile tuition materials that are conducive to learning and/or analyse and reflect on certain topics from a subject-based and pedagogical angle.
ObjectiveThe objective is for the students:
- to be able to familiarise themselves with a tuition topic by consulting different sources, acquiring materials and reflecting on the relevance of the topic and the access they have selected to this topic from a specialist, subject-didactics and pedagogical angle and potentially from a social angle too.
- to show that they can independently compile a tuition sequence that is conducive to learning and develop this to the point where it is ready for use.
ContentThematic Focus
The topics of the mentored work are mostly chosen from the high school curriculum.

Methods
With the help of the mentor the students individually work on a topic and write a thesis about it.
402-0918-00LMentored Work Subject Didactics Physics B Information Restricted registration - show details
Mentored Work Subject Didactics in Physics for TC and Teaching Diploma.
2 credits4AG. Schiltz, A. Vaterlaus, C. Wagner
AbstractIn their mentored work on subject didactics, students put into practice the contents of the subject-didactics lectures and go into these in greater depth. Under supervision, they compile tuition materials that are conducive to learning and/or analyse and reflect on certain topics from a subject-based and pedagogical angle.
ObjectiveThe objective is for the students:
- to be able to familiarise themselves with a tuition topic by consulting different sources, acquiring materials and reflecting on the relevance of the topic and the access they have selected to this topic from a specialist, subject-didactics and pedagogical angle and potentially from a social angle too.
- to show that they can independently compile a tuition sequence that is conducive to learning and develop this to the point where it is ready for use.
ContentFocus of conten
The topics of the mentored work are mostly chosen from the high school curriculum.

Methods
With the help of the mentor the students individually work on a topic and write a thesis about it.
402-0922-00LMentored Work Specialised Courses in Physics with an Educational Focus A Information Restricted registration - show details
Mentored Work Specialised Courses in the Respective Subject with an Educational Focus in Physics for TC and Teaching Diploma.
2 credits4AG. Schiltz, A. Vaterlaus, C. Wagner
AbstractIn the mentored work on their subject specialisation, students link high-school and university aspects of the subject, thus strengthening their teaching competence with regard to curriculum decisions and the future development of the tuition. They compile texts under supervision that are directly comprehensible to the targeted readers - generally specialist-subject teachers at high-school level.
ObjectivePractice in the explanation of complex topics in physics as the core competence of the teaching profession

Improvement of the physics education by providing attractive recent topics with regard to future curricular decisions and the public view of physics
ContentChoice of topic by individual arrangement
402-0923-00LMentored Work Specialised Courses in Physics with an Educational Focus B Information Restricted registration - show details
Mentored Work Specialised Courses in the Respective Subject with an Educational Focus in Physics for Teaching Diploma and for students upgrading TC to Teaching Diploma.
2 credits4AG. Schiltz, A. Vaterlaus, C. Wagner
AbstractIn the mentored work on their subject specialisation, students link high-school and university aspects of the subject, thus strengthening their teaching competence with regard to curriculum decisions and the future development of the tuition. They compile texts under supervision that are directly comprehensible to the targeted readers - generally specialist-subject teachers at high-school level.
ObjectivePractice in the explanation of complex topics in physics as the core competence of the teaching profession

Improvement of the physics education by providing attractive recent topics with regard to future curricular decisions and the public view of physics
ContentChoice of topic by individual arrangement
402-0924-00LInternship Physics Didactics Restricted registration - show details
Internship Physics Didactics for Teaching Diploma with Physics as First Subject.

Obligatorisch für Studierende, die ab FS 2014 in das Lehrdiplom eintreten.

Studierende, die vor dem FS 2014 in das Lehrdiplom eingetreten sind, müssen entweder die mentorierte Arbeit oder das Fachdidaktikpraktikum Physik als obligatorische Lehrveranstaltung absolvieren. Selbstverständlich können auch beide Lehrveranstaltungen absolviert werden.
4 credits9PM. Mohr, A. Vaterlaus, C. Wagner
AbstractDuring the Internship Physics Didactics students teach 8 lessons in the classes of an internship teaching person. Students develop, test and analyze teaching arrangement under the guidance of a mentor (one of the lecturers).
ObjectiveBasic knowledge for the design of teaching arrangements is the topic of the Physics Didactics I and II courses. In the subsequent Internship Physics Didactics students combine the theoretical knowledge acquired in the didactics courses with practical aspects of teaching. During the internship students learn to transform their teaching goals into a real live class room setting considering subject specific, didactical and pedagogical aspects.
ContentDas Fachdidaktikpraktikum bietet den Studierenden eine Möglichkeit, Lernumgebungen wirksam zu gestalten und ihr methodisches Repertoire gezielt zu erweitern. In Absprache mit der Praktikumslehrperson und dem Mentor werden die Aufträge für die Gestaltung der Arrangements formuliert. Die schriftlichen Ausarbeitungen und die Reflexionen über die Lektionen sind Bestandteil des Portfolios, welches die Studierenden für diese Veranstaltung anlegen. Zu den Lektionen führt die Praktikumslehrperson Vor- und Nachbesprechungen durch.
Lecture notesWird vom Mentor bestimmt.
Prerequisites / NoticeDas Fachdidaktikpraktikum kann erst nach dem Besuch der FD1 und frühestens mit der FD2 durchgeführt werden (eine gleichzeitige Belegung von Fachdidaktik 2 und Fachdidaktikpraktikum ist möglich).
402-0944-00LScience in School (Current Topics for the Classroom) Restricted registration - show details
Enrolment in Physics Didactics I (402-0910-00L) and Physics Didactics II (402-0910-00L) is mandatory.
2 credits2GC. Wagner, A. Vaterlaus
AbstractIn dieser Veranstaltung geht es um die folgenden Fragen: Wie können wir die Wissenschaft in die Schulen bringen? Welche wissenschaftlichen Artikel kann man so umsetzen, dass man sie im Unterricht gebrauchen kann? Welche Themen interessieren? Welche Unterrichtsmethoden eignen sich für die Umsetzung? Wie soll man das Gelernte überprüfen?
ObjectiveSie kennen Unterrichtssequenzen zu modernen Themen der Astrophysik, Biophysik, Quantenelektronik und der Festkörperphysik, die sich im Physikunterricht einsetzen lassen und können selbständig neue Themen erschliessen.
ContentKennenlernen und erarbeiten (Übungen) von Unterrichtssequenzen zu modernen Themen der Physik.
Lecture notesUnterlagen werden verteilt.
LiteratureWird angegeben.
Prerequisites / NoticeDer Besuch der FD1 sowie der FD2 in Physik wird vorausgesetzt. Zu den Themen der Vorlesung können mentorierte Arbeiten verfasst werden.
406-0062-AALPhysics I
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
5 credits11RA. Vaterlaus
AbstractIntroduction to the concepts and tools in physics: mechanics of point-like and rigid bodies, elasticity theory, elements of hydrostatics and hydrodynamics, periodic motion and mechanical waves.
ObjectiveIntroduction to the scientific methodology. The student should develop his/her capability to turn physical observations into mathematical models, and to solve the latter.
The student should acquire an overview over the basic concepts in mechanics.
ContentBook:
Physics for Scientists and Engineers, Douglas C. Giancoli, Pearson Education (2009), ISBN: 978-0-13-157849-4

Chapters:
1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 (without: 6-5, 6-6, 6-8), 7, 8 (without 8-9), 9, 10 (without 10-10), 11 (without 11-7), 13 (without 13-13, 13-14), 14 (without 14-6), 15 (without 15-3, 15-5)
Literaturesee "Content"

Friedhelm Kuypers
Physik für Ingenieure und Naturwissenschaftler
Band 1: Mechanik und Thermodynamik
Wiley-VCH Verlag, 2002, 544 S, ca.: Fr. 68.-
406-0063-AALPhysics II
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
5 credits11RA. Vaterlaus
AbstractIntroduction to the "way of thinking" and the methodology in Physics. The Chapters treated are Magnetism, Refraction and Diffraction of Waves, Elements of Quantum Mechanics with applications to Spectroscopy, Thermodynamics, Phase Transitions, Transport Phenomena.
ObjectiveIntroduction to the scientific methodology. The student should develop his/her capability to turn physical observations into mathematical models, and to solve the latter.
The student should acquire an overview over the basic concepts used in the theory of heat and electricity.
ContentBook:
Physics for Scientists and Engineers, Douglas C. Giancoli, Pearson Education (2009), ISBN: 978-0-13-157849-4

Chapters:
17 (without 17-5, 17-10), 18 (without 18-5, 18-6, 18-7), 19, 20 (without 20-7, 20-8, 20-9, 20-10, 20-11), 21 (without 21-12), 23, 25 (without 25-9, 25-10), 26 (without 26-4, 26-5, 26-7), 27, 28 (without 28-4, 28-5, 28-8. 28-9, 28-10), 29 (without 29-5, 29-8), 32 (without 32-8), 33 (without 33-4, 33-5, 33-9, 33-10), 34 (without 34-4, 34-6, 34-7), 35 (without 35-2, 35-3, 35-9, 35-11, 35-12, 35-13).
Literaturesee "Content"

Friedhelm Kuypers
Physik für Ingenieure und Naturwissenschaftler
Band 2 Elektrizität, Optik, Wellen
Verlag Wiley-VCH, 2003, Fr. 77.-
701-0901-00LETH Week 2016: Challenging Water Restricted registration - show details
All ETH Bachelor`s, Master`s students and exchange students can take part in the ETH week 2016.
Tuition, food and accommodation are free of charge.
1 creditR. Knutti, C. Bratrich, S. Brusoni, P. Burlando, A. Cabello Llamas, G. Folkers, D. Molnar, A. Vaterlaus, B. Wehrli
AbstractThe ETH Week is an innovative one-week course designed to foster critical thinking and creative learning. Students from all departments as well as professors and external experts will work together in interdisciplinary teams. They will develop interventions that could play a role in solving some of our most pressing global challenges. In 2016, ETH Week will focus on the topic of water.
Objective- Domain specific knowledge: Students have immersed knowledge about a certain complex, societal topic which will be selected every year They understand the complex system context of the current topic, by comprehending its scientific, technical, political, social, ecological and economic perspectives. The focus in 2016 is on challenging water systems.

- Analytical skills The ETH Week participants are able to structure complex problems systematically using selected methods. They are able to acquire further knowledge and to critically analyze the knowledge in interdisciplinary groups and with experts and the help of team tutors.

- Design skills: The students are able to use their knowledge and skills to develop concrete approaches for problem solving and decision making to a selected problem statement, critically reflect these approaches, assess their feasibility, to transfer them into a concrete form (physical model, prototypes, strategy paper,...) and to present this work in a creative way (role-plays, videos, exhibitions, etc.).

- Self-competence: The students are able to plan their work effectively, efficiently and autonomously. By considering approaches from different disciplines they are able to make a judgment and form a personal opinion. In exchange with non-academic partners from business, politics, administration, nongovernmental organizations and media they are able to communicate appropriately, present their results professionally and creatively and convince a critical audience.

- Social competence: The students are able to work in multidisciplinary teams, i.e. they can reflect critically their own discipline, debate with students from other disciplines and experts in a critical-constructive and respectful way and can relate their own positions to different intellectual approaches. They can assess how far they are able to actively make a contribution to society by using their personal and professional talents and skills and as "Change Agents".
ContentThe week is mainly about problem solving and design thinking applied to the complex world of water. During ETH Week students will have the opportunity to work in small interdisciplinary groups, allowing them to critically analyze both their own approaches and those of other disciplines, and to integrate these into their work.

While deepening their knowledge about how the food system works, students will be introduced to various methods and tools for generating creative ideas and understand how different people are affected by each part of the system. In addition to lectures and literature, students will acquire knowledge via excursions into the real world, empirical observations, and conversations with researchers and experts

A key attribute of the ETH Week is that students are expected to find their own problem, rather than just solve the problem that has been handed to them.
Therefore, the first three days of the week will concentrate on identifying a problem the individual teams will work on, while the last two days are focused on generating solutions and communicating the team's ideas.

A panel of experts will judge your presentations at the end of the week. The winning teams will receive attractive prizes.
Prerequisites / NoticeNo prerequisites. Program is open to Bachelor and Masters from all ETH Departments. All students must apply through a competitive application process that will open in March 2016 at www.ethz.ch/ETHWeek. Participation is subject to successful selection through this competitive process.