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Daniel Kiper: Katalogdaten im Herbstsemester 2018

NameHerr Dr. Daniel Kiper
Adresse
Institut für Neuroinformatik
ETH Zürich, Y55 G 92
Winterthurerstrasse 190
8057 Zürich
SWITZERLAND
Telefon+41 44 633 83 35
E-Mailkiperd@ethz.ch
DepartementInformationstechnologie und Elektrotechnik
BeziehungDozent

NummerTitelECTSUmfangDozierende
227-1037-00LIntroduction to Neuroinformatics Information 6 KP2V + 1UV. Mante, M. Cook, B. Grewe, G. Indiveri, D. Kiper, W. von der Behrens
KurzbeschreibungThe course provides an introduction to the functional properties of neurons. Particularly the description of membrane electrical properties (action potentials, channels), neuronal anatomy, synaptic structures, and neuronal networks. Simple models of computation, learning, and behavior will be explained. Some artificial systems (robot, chip) are presented.
LernzielUnderstanding computation by neurons and neuronal circuits is one of the great challenges of science. Many different disciplines can contribute their tools and concepts to solving mysteries of neural computation. The goal of this introductory course is to introduce the monocultures of physics, maths, computer science, engineering, biology, psychology, and even philosophy and history, to discover the enchantments and challenges that we all face in taking on this major 21st century problem and how each discipline can contribute to discovering solutions.
InhaltThis course considers the structure and function of biological neural networks at different levels. The function of neural networks lies fundamentally in their wiring and in the electro-chemical properties of nerve cell membranes. Thus, the biological structure of the nerve cell needs to be understood if biologically-realistic models are to be constructed. These simpler models are used to estimate the electrical current flow through dendritic cables and explore how a more complex geometry of neurons influences this current flow. The active properties of nerves are studied to understand both sensory transduction and the generation and transmission of nerve impulses along axons. The concept of local neuronal circuits arises in the context of the rules governing the formation of nerve connections and topographic projections within the nervous system. Communication between neurons in the network can be thought of as information flow across synapses, which can be modified by experience. We need an understanding of the action of inhibitory and excitatory neurotransmitters and neuromodulators, so that the dynamics and logic of synapses can be interpreted. Finally, the neural architectures of feedforward and recurrent networks will be discussed in the context of co-ordination, control, and integration of sensory and motor information in neural networks.
227-1045-00LReadings in Neuroinformatics (University of Zurich)
No enrolment to this course at ETH Zurich. Book the corresponding module directly at UZH.
UZH Module Code: INI431

Mind the enrolment deadlines at UZH:
https://www.uzh.ch/cmsssl/en/studies/application/mobilitaet.html
3 KP1SG. Indiveri, M. Cook, D. Kiper, Y. Sandamirskaya
KurzbeschreibungThirteen major areas of research have been selected, which cover the key concepts that have led to our current ideas of how the nervous system is built and functions. We will read both original papers and explore the conceptual the links between them and discuss the 'sociology' of science, the pursuit of basic science questions over a century of research."
LernzielIt is a commonplace that scientists rarely cite literature that is older than 10 years and when they do, they usually cite one paper that serves as the representative for a larger body of work that has long since been incorporated anonymously in textbooks. Worse than that, many authors have not even read the papers they cite in their own publications. This course, ‘Foundations of Neuroscience’ is one antidote. Thirteen major areas of research have been selected, which cover the key concepts that have led to our current ideas of how the nervous system is built and functions. Unusually, we will explore these areas of research by reading the original publications, instead of reading someone else’s digested summary from a textbook or review. By doing this, we will learn how the discoveries were made, what instrumentation was used, how the scientists interpreted their own findings, and how their work, often over many decades and linked together with related findings from many different scientists, generate the current views of mechanism and structure of the nervous system. To give one concrete example, in 1890 Roy and Sherrington showed that there was a neural activity-dependent regulation of blood flow in the brain. One hundred years later, Ogawa discovered that they could use Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) to measure a blood oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) signal, which they showed was neural activity-dependent. This discovery led to the development of human functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI), which has revolutionized neuropsychology and neuropsychiatry. We will read both these original papers and explore the conceptual the links between them and discuss the ‘sociology’ of science, which in this case, the pursuit of basic science questions over a century of research, led to an explosion in applications. We will also explore the personalities of the scientists and the context in which they made their seminal discoveries. Each week the course members will be given original papers to read for homework, they will have to write a short abstract for each paper. We will then meet weekly with the course leader (KACM) and an assistant for an hour-or-so long interactive seminar. An intimate knowledge of the papers will be assumed so that the discussion does not center simply on an explication of the contents of the papers. Assessment will in the form of a written exam in which the students will be given a paper and asked to write a short abstract of the contents.
InhaltIt is a commonplace that scientists rarely cite literature that is older than 10 years and when they do, they usually cite one paper that serves as the representative for a larger body of work that has long since been incorporated anonymously in textbooks. Worse than that many authors have not even read the papers they cite in their own publications. This course, ‘Foundations of Neuroscience’ is one antidote. Thirteen major areas of research have been selected, which cover the key concepts that have led to our current ideas of how the nervous system is built and functions. Unusually, we will explore these areas of research by reading the original publications, instead of reading someone else’s digested summary from a textbook or review. By doing this, we will learn how the discoveries were made, what instrumentation was used, how the scientists interpreted their own findings, and how their work, often over many decades and by many different scientists, linked together to generate the current view of mechanism and structure. We will also explore the personalities of the scientists and the context in which they made their seminal discoveries. To give one concrete example, in 1890 Roy and Sherrington showed that there was a neural activity-dependent regulation of blood flow in the brain. One hundred years later, Ogawa discovered that they could use Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) to measure a blood oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) signal, which they showed was neural activity-dependent. This discovery led to the development of human functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI), which has revolutionized neuropsychology and neuropsychiatry. We will read both these original papers and explore the conceptual links between them and discuss the ‘sociology’ of science, which in this case, the pursuit of basic science questions over a century of research, led to an explosion in applications. Each week the course members will be given between 2 and 4 papers to read for homework and we will then meet weekly for an hour long interactive seminar. An intimate knowledge of the papers will be assumed so that the discussion does not center simply on an explication of the contents of the papers. Assessment will be done continuously as the individual students are asked to explain a figure, technique, or concept.
227-1047-00LConsciousness: From Philosophy to Neuroscience (University of Zurich) Information
No enrolment to this course at ETH Zurich. Book the corresponding module directly at UZH.
UZH Module Code: INI410

Mind the enrolment deadlines at UZH:
https://www.uzh.ch/cmsssl/en/studies/application/mobilitaet.html
3 KP2VD. Kiper
KurzbeschreibungThis seminar reviews the philosophical and phenomenological as well as the neurobiological aspects of consciousness. The subjective features of consciousness are explored, and modern research into its neural substrate, particularly in the visual domain, is explained. Emphasis is placed on students developing their own thinking through a discussion-centered course structure.
LernzielThe course's goal is to give an overview of the contemporary state of consciousness research, with emphasis on the contributions brought by modern cognitive neuroscience. We aim to clarify concepts, explain their philosophical and scientific backgrounds, and to present experimental protocols that shed light on on a variety of consciousness related issues.
InhaltThe course includes discussions of scientific as well as philosophical articles. We review current schools of thought, models of consciousness, and proposals for the neural correlate of consciousness (NCC).
SkriptNone
LiteraturWe display articles pertaining to the issues we cover in the class on the course's webpage.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesSince we are all experts on consciousness, we expect active participation and discussions!
227-1051-00LSystems Neuroscience (University of Zurich)
No enrolment to this course at ETH Zurich. Book the corresponding module directly at UZH.
UZH Module Code: INI415

Mind the enrolment deadlines at UZH:
https://www.uzh.ch/cmsssl/en/studies/application/mobilitaet.html
6 KP2V + 1UD. Kiper
KurzbeschreibungThis course focuses on basic aspects of central nervous system physiology, including perception, motor control and cognitive functions.
LernzielTo understand the basic concepts underlying perceptual, motor and cognitive functions.
InhaltMain emphasis sensory systems, with complements on motor and cognitive functions.
SkriptNone
Literatur"The senses", ed. H. Barlow and J. Mollon, Cambridge.
"Principles of Neural Science", Kandel, Schwartz, and Jessel
Voraussetzungen / Besonderesnone