Paolo Penna: Catalogue data in Spring Semester 2020

Name Dr. Paolo Penna
Address
Institut für Maschinelles Lernen
ETH Zürich, CAB F 63.2
Universitätstrasse 6
8092 Zürich
SWITZERLAND
Telephone+41 44 632 04 92
Fax+41 44 632 15 62
E-mailpaolo.penna@inf.ethz.ch
URLhttps://www.inf.ethz.ch/personal/pennap/
DepartmentComputer Science
RelationshipLecturer

NumberTitleECTSHoursLecturers
252-3002-00LAlgorithms for Database Systems Information Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 15.

The deadline for deregistering expires at the end of the second week of the semester. Students who are still registered after that date, but do not attend the seminar, will officially fail the seminar.
2 credits2SP. Penna
AbstractQuery processing, optimization, stream-based systems, distributed and parallel databases, non-standard databases.
ObjectiveDevelop an understanding of selected problems of current interest in the area of algorithms for database systems.
252-4303-00LTopics at the Intersection between Theoretical Computer Science and other Disciplines Information Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 22.

The deadline for deregistering expires at the end of the second week of the semester. Students who are still registered after that date, but do not attend the seminar, will officially fail the seminar.
2 credits2SP. Penna
AbstractStudents present papers in Theoretical Computer Science which have also some "interdisciplinary flavor". Methods in classical theory of computing are used to better understand some fundamental questions in other fields (biology, social science, economics, etc.). The talks give a first outlook of these type of results which typically provide rigorous analysis of algorithms ("prove theorems").
ObjectiveLearn how to understand and present the key ideas and mathematical concepts in theory papers; Develop a critical attitude to evaluate the importance of a theoretical result and its practical relevance.
ContentIn this seminar students will present papers in Theoretical Computer Science which have also some "interdisciplinary flavor". For example, they use methods in classical theory of computing to advance our understanding of some fundamental question in other fields (biology, social science, economics, etc.).

The talks will give us a first outlook of these type of results which provide rigorous analysis of algorithms ("prove theorems"). In their presentations, students should put the results into context, isolate the "computer science" or "computational" aspect, and its relation to the practical question.