Ralf Hiptmair: Catalogue data in Spring Semester 2021

Name Prof. Dr. Ralf Hiptmair
FieldMathematik
Address
Seminar für Angewandte Mathematik
ETH Zürich, HG G 58.2
Rämistrasse 101
8092 Zürich
SWITZERLAND
Telephone+41 44 632 34 04
Fax+41 44 632 11 04
E-mailralf.hiptmair@sam.math.ethz.ch
URLhttps://www.math.ethz.ch/sam/the-institute/people/ralf-hiptmair.html
DepartmentMathematics
RelationshipFull Professor

NumberTitleECTSHoursLecturers
401-0674-AALNumerical Methods for Partial Differential Equations
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
10 credits21RR. Hiptmair
AbstractDerivation, properties, and implementation of fundamental numerical methods for a few key partial differential equations,among them (convection)-diffusion and heat equations, wave equation, conservation laws. Implementation in C++ based on a finite element library.
ObjectiveMain skills to be acquired in this course:
* Ability to implement fundamental numerical methods for the solution of partial differential equations efficiently.
* Ability to modify and adapt numerical algorithms guided by awareness of their mathematical foundations.
* Ability to select and assess numerical methods in light of the predictions of theory
* Ability to identify features of a PDE (= partial differential equation) based model that are relevant for the selection and performance of a numerical algorithm.
* Ability to understand research publications on theoretical and practical aspects of numerical methods for partial differential equations.
* Skills in the efficient implementation of finite element methods on unstructured meshes.

This course is neither a course on the mathematical foundations and numerical analysis of methods nor an course that merely teaches recipes and how to apply software packages.
Content1 Second-Order Scalar Elliptic Boundary Value Problems
1.2 Equilibrium Models: Examples
1.3 Sobolev spaces
1.4 Linear Variational Problems
1.5 Equilibrium Models: Boundary Value Problems
1.6 Diffusion Models (Stationary Heat Conduction)
1.7 Boundary Conditions
1.8 Second-Order Elliptic Variational Problems
1.9 Essential and Natural Boundary Conditions
2 Finite Element Methods (FEM)
2.2 Principles of Galerkin Discretization
2.3 Case Study: Linear FEM for Two-Point Boundary Value Problems
2.4 Case Study: Triangular Linear FEM in Two Dimensions
2.5 Building Blocks of General Finite Element Methods
2.6 Lagrangian Finite Element Methods
2.7 Implementation of Finite Element Methods
2.7.1 Mesh Generation and Mesh File Format
2.7.2 Mesh Information and Mesh Data Structures
2.7.2.1 L EHR FEM++ Mesh: Container Layer
2.7.2.2 L EHR FEM++ Mesh: Topology Layer
2.7.2.3 L EHR FEM++ Mesh: Geometry Layer
2.7.3 Vectors and Matrices
2.7.4 Assembly Algorithms
2.7.4.1 Assembly: Localization
2.7.4.2 Assembly: Index Mappings
2.7.4.3 Distribute Assembly Schemes
2.7.4.4 Assembly: Linear Algebra Perspective
2.7.5 Local Computations
2.7.5.1 Analytic Formulas for Entries of Element Matrices
2.7.5.2 Local Quadrature
2.7.6 Treatment of Essential Boundary Conditions
2.8 Parametric Finite Element Methods
3 FEM: Convergence and Accuracy
3.1 Abstract Galerkin Error Estimates
3.2 Empirical (Asymptotic) Convergence of Lagrangian FEM
3.3 A Priori (Asymptotic) Finite Element Error Estimates
3.4 Elliptic Regularity Theory
3.5 Variational Crimes
3.6 FEM: Duality Techniques for Error Estimation
3.7 Discrete Maximum Principle
3.8 Validation and Debugging of Finite Element Codes
4 Beyond FEM: Alternative Discretizations [dropped]
5 Non-Linear Elliptic Boundary Value Problems [dropped]
6 Second-Order Linear Evolution Problems
6.1 Time-Dependent Boundary Value Problems
6.2 Parabolic Initial-Boundary Value Problems
6.3 Linear Wave Equations
7 Convection-Diffusion Problems [dropped]
8 Numerical Methods for Conservation Laws
8.1 Conservation Laws: Examples
8.2 Scalar Conservation Laws in 1D
8.3 Conservative Finite Volume (FV) Discretization
8.4 Timestepping for Finite-Volume Methods
8.5 Higher-Order Conservative Finite-Volume Schemes
Lecture notesThe lecture will be taught in flipped classroom format:
- Video tutorials for all thematic units will be published online.
- Tablet notes accompanying the videos will be made available to the audience as PDF.
- A comprehensive PDF handout will cover all aspects of the lecture.
LiteratureChapters of the following books provide supplementary reading
(detailed references in course material):

* D. Braess: Finite Elemente,
Theorie, schnelle Löser und Anwendungen in der Elastizitätstheorie, Springer 2007 (available online).
* S. Brenner and R. Scott. Mathematical theory of finite element methods, Springer 2008 (available online).
* A. Ern and J.-L. Guermond. Theory and Practice of Finite Elements, volume 159 of Applied Mathematical Sciences. Springer, New York, 2004.
* Ch. Großmann and H.-G. Roos: Numerical Treatment of Partial Differential Equations, Springer 2007.
* W. Hackbusch. Elliptic Differential Equations. Theory and Numerical Treatment, volume 18 of Springer Series in Computational Mathematics. Springer, Berlin, 1992.
* P. Knabner and L. Angermann. Numerical Methods for Elliptic and Parabolic Partial Differential Equations, volume 44 of Texts in Applied Mathematics. Springer, Heidelberg, 2003.
* S. Larsson and V. Thomée. Partial Differential Equations with Numerical Methods, volume 45 of Texts in Applied Mathematics. Springer, Heidelberg, 2003.
* R. LeVeque. Finite Volume Methods for Hyperbolic Problems. Cambridge Texts in Applied Mathematics. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK, 2002.

However, study of supplementary literature is not important for for following the course.
Prerequisites / NoticeMastery of basic calculus and linear algebra is taken for granted.
Familiarity with fundamental numerical methods (solution methods for linear systems of equations, interpolation, approximation, numerical quadrature, numerical integration of ODEs) is essential.

Important: Coding skills and experience in C++ are essential.

Homework assignments involve substantial coding, partly based on a C++ finite element library. The written examination will be computer based and will comprise coding tasks.
401-0674-00LNumerical Methods for Partial Differential Equations
Not meant for BSc/MSc students of mathematics.
10 credits2G + 2U + 2P + 4AR. Hiptmair
AbstractDerivation, properties, and implementation of fundamental numerical methods for a few key partial differential equations: convection-diffusion, heat equation, wave equation, conservation laws. Implementation in C++ based on a finite element library.
ObjectiveMain skills to be acquired in this course:
* Ability to implement fundamental numerical methods for the solution of partial differential equations efficiently.
* Ability to modify and adapt numerical algorithms guided by awareness of their mathematical foundations.
* Ability to select and assess numerical methods in light of the predictions of theory
* Ability to identify features of a PDE (= partial differential equation) based model that are relevant for the selection and performance of a numerical algorithm.
* Ability to understand research publications on theoretical and practical aspects of numerical methods for partial differential equations.
* Skills in the efficient implementation of finite element methods on unstructured meshes.

This course is neither a course on the mathematical foundations and numerical analysis of methods nor an course that merely teaches recipes and how to apply software packages.
Content1 Second-Order Scalar Elliptic Boundary Value Problems
1.2 Equilibrium Models: Examples
1.3 Sobolev spaces
1.4 Linear Variational Problems
1.5 Equilibrium Models: Boundary Value Problems
1.6 Diffusion Models (Stationary Heat Conduction)
1.7 Boundary Conditions
1.8 Second-Order Elliptic Variational Problems
1.9 Essential and Natural Boundary Conditions
2 Finite Element Methods (FEM)
2.2 Principles of Galerkin Discretization
2.3 Case Study: Linear FEM for Two-Point Boundary Value Problems
2.4 Case Study: Triangular Linear FEM in Two Dimensions
2.5 Building Blocks of General Finite Element Methods
2.6 Lagrangian Finite Element Methods
2.7 Implementation of Finite Element Methods
2.7.1 Mesh Generation and Mesh File Format
2.7.2 Mesh Information and Mesh Data Structures
2.7.2.1 L EHR FEM++ Mesh: Container Layer
2.7.2.2 L EHR FEM++ Mesh: Topology Layer
2.7.2.3 L EHR FEM++ Mesh: Geometry Layer
2.7.3 Vectors and Matrices
2.7.4 Assembly Algorithms
2.7.4.1 Assembly: Localization
2.7.4.2 Assembly: Index Mappings
2.7.4.3 Distribute Assembly Schemes
2.7.4.4 Assembly: Linear Algebra Perspective
2.7.5 Local Computations
2.7.5.1 Analytic Formulas for Entries of Element Matrices
2.7.5.2 Local Quadrature
2.7.6 Treatment of Essential Boundary Conditions
2.8 Parametric Finite Element Methods
3 FEM: Convergence and Accuracy
3.1 Abstract Galerkin Error Estimates
3.2 Empirical (Asymptotic) Convergence of Lagrangian FEM
3.3 A Priori (Asymptotic) Finite Element Error Estimates
3.4 Elliptic Regularity Theory
3.5 Variational Crimes
3.6 FEM: Duality Techniques for Error Estimation
3.7 Discrete Maximum Principle
3.8 Validation and Debugging of Finite Element Codes
4 Beyond FEM: Alternative Discretizations [dropped]
5 Non-Linear Elliptic Boundary Value Problems [dropped]
6 Second-Order Linear Evolution Problems
6.1 Time-Dependent Boundary Value Problems
6.2 Parabolic Initial-Boundary Value Problems
6.3 Linear Wave Equations
7 Convection-Diffusion Problems [dropped]
8 Numerical Methods for Conservation Laws
8.1 Conservation Laws: Examples
8.2 Scalar Conservation Laws in 1D
8.3 Conservative Finite Volume (FV) Discretization
8.4 Timestepping for Finite-Volume Methods
8.5 Higher-Order Conservative Finite-Volume Schemes
Lecture notesThe lecture will be taught in flipped classroom format:
- Video tutorials for all thematic units will be published online.
- Tablet notes accompanying the videos will be made available to the audience as PDF.
- A comprehensive lecture document will cover all aspects of the course.
LiteratureChapters of the following books provide supplementary reading
(detailed references in course material):

* D. Braess: Finite Elemente,
Theorie, schnelle Löser und Anwendungen in der Elastizitätstheorie, Springer 2007 (available online).
* S. Brenner and R. Scott. Mathematical theory of finite element methods, Springer 2008 (available online).
* A. Ern and J.-L. Guermond. Theory and Practice of Finite Elements, volume 159 of Applied Mathematical Sciences. Springer, New York, 2004.
* Ch. Großmann and H.-G. Roos: Numerical Treatment of Partial Differential Equations, Springer 2007.
* W. Hackbusch. Elliptic Differential Equations. Theory and Numerical Treatment, volume 18 of Springer Series in Computational Mathematics. Springer, Berlin, 1992.
* P. Knabner and L. Angermann. Numerical Methods for Elliptic and Parabolic Partial Differential Equations, volume 44 of Texts in Applied Mathematics. Springer, Heidelberg, 2003.
* S. Larsson and V. Thomée. Partial Differential Equations with Numerical Methods, volume 45 of Texts in Applied Mathematics. Springer, Heidelberg, 2003.
* R. LeVeque. Finite Volume Methods for Hyperbolic Problems. Cambridge Texts in Applied Mathematics. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK, 2002.

However, study of supplementary literature is not important for for following the course.
Prerequisites / NoticeMastery of basic calculus and linear algebra is taken for granted.
Familiarity with fundamental numerical methods (solution methods for linear systems of equations, interpolation, approximation, numerical quadrature, numerical integration of ODEs) is essential.

Important: Coding skills and experience in C++ are essential.

Homework assignments involve substantial coding, partly based on a C++ finite element library. The written examination will be computer based and will comprise coding tasks.
401-3667-21LCase Studies Seminar (Spring Semester 2021) Information 3 credits2SV. C. Gradinaru, R. Hiptmair, R. Käppeli, M. Reiher
AbstractIn the CSE Case Studies Seminar invited speakers from ETH, from other universities as well as from industry give a talk on an applied topic. Beside of attending the scientific talks students are asked to give short presentations (10 minutes) on a published paper out of a list.
Objective
ContentIn the CSE Case Studies Seminar invited speakers from ETH, from other universities as well as from industry give a talk on an applied topic. Beside of attending the scientific talks students are asked to give short presentations (10 minutes) on a published paper out of a list (containing articles from, e.g., Nature, Science, Scientific American, etc.). If the underlying paper comprises more than 15 pages, two or three consecutive case studies presentations delivered by different students can be based on it. Consistency in layout, style, and contents of those presentations is expected.
Prerequisites / NoticeIn Spring 2020 the talks will be given via Zoom.
About the video conferencing system Zoom:

Zoom is a do-it-yourself video conferencing system supported by ETH. With Zoom, one person can give a lecture with a presentation and up to 100 people can join in via chat or audio connection.Use the provided link to enter the Zoom room at the designated time. Download/Open the Zoom App or join the meeting via the browser. Please test whether you can join the room and whether the audio works properly beforehand. We recommend you use a headset in order to minimize unwanted sounds from your environment.

More Info:

https://support.zoom.us/hc/en-us/articles/201362193-Joining-a-Meeting
https://ethz.ch/services/de/it-services/katalog/multimedia/video-konferenz/zoom.html
https://support.zoom.us/hc/en-us
401-5650-00LZurich Colloquium in Applied and Computational Mathematics Information 0 credits1KR. Abgrall, R. Alaifari, H. Ammari, R. Hiptmair, S. Mishra, S. Sauter, C. Schwab
AbstractResearch colloquium
Objective
406-0663-AALNumerical Methods for CSE
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
8 credits17RR. Hiptmair
AbstractIntroduction into fundamental techniques and algorithms of numerical mathematics which play a central role in numerical simulations in science and technology.
Objective* Knowledge of the fundamental algorithms in numerical mathematics
* Knowledge of the essential terms in numerical mathematics and the
techniques used for the analysis of numerical algorithms
* Ability to choose the appropriate numerical method for concrete problems
* Ability to interpret numerical results
* Ability to implement numerical algorithms afficiently in C++
Content1. Computing with Matrices and Vectors
2. Direct Methods for Linear Systems of Equations
3. Direct Methods for Linear Least Squares Problems
4. Filtering Algorithms
5. Data Interpolation and Data Fitting in 1D
6. Approximation of Functions in 1D
7. Numerical Quadrature
8. Iterative Methods for Non-linear Systems of Equations
12. Numerical Integration - Single Step Methods
13. Single Step Methods for Stiff Initial Value Problems
Lecture noteshttps://people.math.ethz.ch/~grsam/HS16/NumCSE/NumCSE16.pdf
LiteratureW. Dahmen, A. Reusken "Numerik für Ingenieure und Naturwissenschaftler", Springer 2006.
M. Hanke-Bourgeois "Grundlagen der Numerischen Mathematik und des wissenschaftlichen Rechnens", BG Teubner, 2002
P. Deuflhard and A. Hohmann, "Numerische Mathematik I", DeGruyter, 2002
U. Ascher and C. Greif "A first course in Numerical Methods"
Prerequisites / NoticeExamination will be conducted at the computer and will involve coding in C++/Eigen.
A course covering the material is taught in English every autumn term (course unit 401-0663-00L). Course documents, exercises and examinations are available online.