Autumn Semester 2020 takes place in a mixed form of online and classroom teaching.
Please read the published information on the individual courses carefully.

David Basin: Catalogue data in Autumn Semester 2018

Name Prof. Dr. David Basin
FieldInformationssicherheit
Address
Institut f. Informationssicherheit
ETH Zürich, CNB F 106
Universitätstrasse 6
8092 Zürich
SWITZERLAND
Telephone+41 44 632 72 45
Fax+41 44 632 11 72
E-mailbasin@inf.ethz.ch
URLhttp://www.inf.ethz.ch/personal/basin/
DepartmentComputer Science
RelationshipFull Professor

NumberTitleECTSHoursLecturers
252-0463-00LSecurity Engineering Information 5 credits2V + 2UD. Basin
AbstractSubject of the class are engineering techniques for developing secure systems. We examine concepts, methods and tools, applied within the different activities of the SW development process to improve security of the system. Topics: security requirements&risk analysis, system modeling&model-based development methods, implementation-level security, and evaluation criteria for secure systems
ObjectiveSecurity engineering is an evolving discipline that unifies two important areas: software engineering and security. Software Engineering addresses the development and application of methods for systematically developing, operating, and maintaining, complex, high-quality software.
Security, on the other hand, is concerned with assuring and verifying properties of a system that relate to confidentiality, integrity, and availability of data.

The goal of this class is to survey engineering techniques for developing secure systems. We will examine concepts, methods, and tools that can be applied within the different activities of the software development process, in order to improve the security of the resulting systems.

Topics covered include

* security requirements & risk analysis,
* system modeling and model-based development methods,
* implementation-level security, and
* evaluation criteria for the development of secure systems
ContentSecurity engineering is an evolving discipline that unifies two important areas: software engineering and security. Software Engineering addresses the development and application of methods for systematically developing, operating, and maintaining, complex, high-quality software.
Security, on the other hand, is concerned with assuring and verifying properties of a system that relate to confidentiality, integrity, and availability of data.

The goal of this class is to survey engineering techniques for developing secure systems. We will examine concepts, methods, and tools that can be applied within the different activities of the software development process, in order to improve the security of the resulting systems.

Topics covered include

* security requirements & risk analysis,
* system modeling and model-based development methods,
* implementation-level security, and
* evaluation criteria for the development of secure systems

Modules taught:

1. Introduction
- Introduction of Infsec group and speakers
- Security meets SW engineering: an introduction
- The activities of SW engineering, and where security fits in
- Overview of this class
2. Requirements Engineering: Security Requirements and some Analysis
- overview: functional and non-functional requirements
- use cases, misuse cases, sequence diagrams
- safety and security
- FMEA, FTA, attack trees
3. Modeling in the design activities
- structure, behavior, and data flow
- class diagrams, statecharts
4. Model-driven security for access control (design)
- SecureUML as a language for access control
- Combining Design Modeling Languages with SecureUML
- Semantics, i.e., what does it all mean,
- Generation
- Examples and experience
5. Model-driven security (Part II)
- Continuation of above topics
6. Security patterns (design and implementation)
7. Implementation-level security
- Buffer overflows
- Input checking
- Injection attacks
8. Testing
- overview
- model-based testing
- testing security properties
9. Risk analysis and management 1 (project management)
- "risk": assets, threats, vulnerabilities, risk
- risk assessment: quantitative and qualitative
- safeguards
- generic risk analysis procedure
- The OCTAVE approach
10. Risk analysis: IT baseline protection
- Overview
- Example
11. Evaluation criteria
- CMMI
- systems security engineering CMM
- common criteria
12. Guest lecture
- TBA
Literature- Ross Anderson: Security Engineering, Wiley, 2001.
- Matt Bishop: Computer Security, Pearson Education, 2003.
- Ian Sommerville: Software Engineering, 6th ed., Addison-Wesley, 2001.
- John Viega, Gary McGraw: Building Secure Software, Addison-Wesley, 2002.
- Further relevant books and journal/conference articles will be announced in the lecture.
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisite: Class on Information Security
252-0811-00LApplied Security Laboratory Information
In the Master Programme max. 10 credits can be accounted by Labs on top of the Interfocus Courses. Additional Labs will be listed on the Addendum.
8 credits7PD. Basin
AbstractHands-on course on applied aspects of information security. Applied
information security, operating system security, OS hardening, computer forensics, web application security, project work, design, implementation, and configuration of security mechanisms, risk analysis, system review.
ObjectiveThe Applied Security Laboratory addresses four major topics: operating system security (hardening, vulnerability scanning, access control, logging), application security with an emphasis on web applications (web server setup, common web exploits, authentication, session handling, code security), computer forensics, and risk analysis and risk management.
ContentThis course emphasizes applied aspects of Information Security. The students will study a number of topics in a hands-on fashion and carry out experiments in order to better understand the need for secure implementation and configuration of IT systems and to assess the effectivity and impact of security measures. This part is based on a book and virtual machines that include example applications, questions, and answers.

The students will also complete an independent project: based on a set of functional requirements, they will design and implement a prototypical IT system. In addition, they will conduct a thorough security analysis and devise appropriate security measures for their systems. Finally, they will carry out a technical and conceptual review of another system. All project work will be performed in teams and must be properly documented.
Lecture notesThe course is based on the book "Applied Information Security - A Hands-on Approach". More information: http://www.infsec.ethz.ch/appliedlabbook
LiteratureRecommended reading includes:
* Pfleeger, Pfleeger: Security in Computing, Third Edition, Prentice Hall, available online from within ETH
* Garfinkel, Schwartz, Spafford: Practical Unix & Internet Security, O'Reilly & Associates.
* Various: OWASP Guide to Building Secure Web Applications, available online
* Huseby: Innocent Code -- A Security Wake-Up Call for Web Programmers, John Wiley & Sons.
* Scambray, Schema: Hacking Exposed Web Applications, McGraw-Hill.
* O'Reilly, Loukides: Unix Power Tools, O'Reilly & Associates.
* Frisch: Essential System Administration, O'Reilly & Associates.
* NIST: Risk Management Guide for Information Technology Systems, available online as PDF
* BSI: IT-Grundschutzhandbuch, available online
Prerequisites / Notice* The lab allows flexible working since there are only few mandatory meetings during the semester.
* The lab covers a variety of different techniques. Thus, participating students should have a solid foundation in the following areas: information security, operating system administration (especially Unix/Linux), and networking. Students are also expected to have a basic understanding of HTML, PHP, JavaScript, and MySQL because several examples are implemented in these languages.
* Students must be prepared to spend more than three hours per week to complete the lab assignments and the project. This applies particularly to students who do not meet the recommended requirements given above. Successful participants of the course receive 8 credits as compensation for their effort.
* All participants must sign the lab's charter and usage policy during the introduction lecture.
252-4601-00LCurrent Topics in Information Security Information Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 24.

The deadline for deregistering expires at the end of the second week of the semester. Students who are still registered after that date, but do not attend the seminar, will officially fail the seminar.
2 credits2SD. Basin, S. Capkun, A. Perrig
AbstractThe seminar covers various topics in information security: security protocols (models, specification & verification), trust management, access control, non-interference, side-channel attacks, identity-based cryptography, host-based attack detection, anomaly detection in backbone networks, key-management for sensor networks.
ObjectiveThe main goals of the seminar are the independent study of scientific literature and assessment of its contributions as well as learning and practicing presentation techniques.
ContentThe seminar covers various topics in information security, including network security, cryptography and security protocols. The participants are expected to read a scientific paper and present it in a 35-40 min talk. At the beginning of the semester a short introduction to presentation techniques will be given.

Selected Topics

- security protocols: models, specification & verification
- trust management, access control and non-interference
- side-channel attacks
- identity-based cryptography
- host-based attack detection
- anomaly detection in backbone networks
- key-management for sensor networks
LiteratureThe reading list will be published on the course web site.
268-0102-00LApplied Security Laboratory Information Restricted registration - show details
Only for DAS in Cyber Security.
5 credits3PD. Basin
AbstractHands-on course on applied aspects of information security. Applied
information security, operating system security, OS hardening, computer forensics, web application security, project work, design, implementation, and configuration of security mechanisms, risk analysis, system review.
ObjectiveThe Applied Security Laboratory addresses four major topics: operating system security (hardening, vulnerability scanning, access control, logging), application security with an emphasis on web applications (web server setup, common web exploits, authentication, session handling, code security), computer forensics, and risk analysis and risk management.
ContentThis course emphasizes applied aspects of Information Security. The students will study a number of topics in a hands-on fashion and carry out experiments in order to better understand the need for secure implementation and configuration of IT systems and to assess the effectivity and impact of security measures. This part is based on a book and virtual machines that include example applications, questions, and answers.

The students will also complete an independent project: based on a set of functional requirements, they will design and implement a prototypical IT system. In addition, they will conduct a thorough security analysis and devise appropriate security measures for their systems. Finally, they will carry out a technical and conceptual review of another system. All project work will be performed in teams and must be properly documented.
Lecture notesThe course is based on the book "Applied Information Security - A Hands-on Approach". More information: http://www.infsec.ethz.ch/appliedlabbook
LiteratureRecommended reading includes:
* Pfleeger, Pfleeger: Security in Computing, Third Edition, Prentice Hall, available online from within ETH
* Garfinkel, Schwartz, Spafford: Practical Unix & Internet Security, O'Reilly & Associates.
* Various: OWASP Guide to Building Secure Web Applications, available online
* Huseby: Innocent Code -- A Security Wake-Up Call for Web Programmers, John Wiley & Sons.
* Scambray, Schema: Hacking Exposed Web Applications, McGraw-Hill.
* O'Reilly, Loukides: Unix Power Tools, O'Reilly & Associates.
* Frisch: Essential System Administration, O'Reilly & Associates.
* NIST: Risk Management Guide for Information Technology Systems, available online as PDF
* BSI: IT-Grundschutzhandbuch, available online
Prerequisites / Notice* The lab allows flexible working since there are only few mandatory meetings during the semester.
* The lab covers a variety of different techniques. Thus, participating students should have a solid foundation in the following areas: information security, operating system administration (especially Unix/Linux), and networking. Students are also expected to have a basic understanding of HTML, PHP, JavaScript, and MySQL because several examples are implemented in these languages.
* Students must be prepared to spend more than three hours per week to complete the lab assignments and the project. This applies particularly to students who do not meet the recommended requirements given above. Successful participants of the course receive 8 credits as compensation for their effort.
* All participants must sign the lab's charter and usage policy during the introduction lecture.
268-0201-00LInformation Security Seminar and Project Restricted registration - show details
Only for CAS and DAS in Cyber Security.
4 credits2SP. Schaller, D. Basin, S. Capkun, U. Maurer, A. Perrig
AbstractParticipants of the seminar are assigned a recent topic in cyber security. They are expected to become acquainted with the assigned issue and to prepare a corresponding presentation in the context of the seminar.
ObjectiveParticipants have understood and presented a publication or report on a present topic in information security. By attending other participants presentations students get further introduced to additional current information security related topics/incidents.
ContentParticipants of the seminar are assigned a recent topic in cyber security. They are expected to become acquainted with the assigned issue and to prepare a corresponding presentation in the context of the seminar.
364-1058-00LRisk Center Seminar Series Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 50.
0 credits2SB. Stojadinovic, D. Basin, A. Bommier, D. N. Bresch, L.‑E. Cederman, P. Cheridito, H. Gersbach, H. R. Heinimann, M. Larsson, G. Sansavini, F. Schweitzer, D. Sornette, B. Sudret, U. A. Weidmann, S. Wiemer, M. Zeilinger, R. Zenklusen
AbstractThis course is a mixture between a seminar primarily for PhD and postdoc students and a colloquium involving invited speakers. It consists of presentations and subsequent discussions in the area of modeling complex socio-economic systems and crises. Students and other guests are welcome.
ObjectiveParticipants should learn to get an overview of the state of the art in the field, to present it in a well understandable way to an interdisciplinary scientific audience, to develop novel mathematical models for open problems, to analyze them with computers, and to defend their results in response to critical questions. In essence, participants should improve their scientific skills and learn to work scientifically on an internationally competitive level.
ContentThis course is a mixture between a seminar primarily for PhD and postdoc students and a colloquium involving invited speakers. It consists of presentations and subsequent discussions in the area of modeling complex socio-economic systems and crises. For details of the program see the webpage of the colloquium. Students and other guests are welcome.
Lecture notesThere is no script, but a short protocol of the sessions will be sent to all participants who have participated in a particular session. Transparencies of the presentations may be put on the course webpage.
LiteratureLiterature will be provided by the speakers in their respective presentations.
Prerequisites / NoticeParticipants should have relatively good mathematical skills and some experience of how scientific work is performed.