Nina Buchmann: Catalogue data in Autumn Semester 2018

Name Prof. Dr. Nina Buchmann
FieldGraslandwissenschaften
Address
Professur Graslandwissenschaften
ETH Zürich, LFW C 56
Universitätstrasse 2
8092 Zürich
SWITZERLAND
Telephone+41 44 632 39 59
E-mailnina.buchmann@usys.ethz.ch
DepartmentEnvironmental Systems Science
RelationshipFull Professor

NumberTitleECTSHoursLecturers
751-0013-00LWorld Food System Information 4 credits4VN. Buchmann, J. Baumgartner, A. Bearth, R. Finger, M. Kreuzer, M. Loessner, E. J. Windhab
AbstractKnowledge about the World Food System will be provided, based on case studies along food value chains in countries with various development stages and dependent on multiple boundary conditions. This shall generate profound understanding of the associated global challenges especially food scarcity, suboptimal diet and nutrition, food quality and safety as well as effects on the environment.
ObjectiveAttending this course, the students will recognize the elements of the World Food System (WFS) approach and the problems it this supposed to treat. They will especially comprehend the four pillars of global food security, namely (I) food availability (including sustainable production and processing), (I) access to food (physical and monetary), (III) food use (including quality and safety as well as the impact on human health and well being) and (IV) resilience to the boundary conditions (environmental, economic and political). This insight will make them aware of the global driving forces behind our ETH research on food security and is expected to alleviate motivation and understanding for the association of subsequent specific courses within a general context. The course equivalently implements agricultural and food sciences, thus supporting the interdisciplinary view on the WFS scope.
ContentCase studies on certain foods of plant and animal origin serve to demonstrate the entire food value chain from the production of raw material to processed food and its consumer relevant property functions. In doing so, important corresponding aspects for developed, emerging and developing countries are demonstrated, by use of engineering as well as natural and social science approaches.
Lecture notesHandouts and links are provided online.
LiteratureInformation on books and other literature references is communicated during the course.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe course shall particularly elucidate the cross section of Agro- and Food Sciences in the context of important global problems to be solved. Furthermore the students in the first year of studies shall be given some insight and outlook supporting the development of their views and interests in agricultural and food sciences further.
The course is part of the block exam after the first study year. Paper copies can be used ("Open Book") during the on-line exam, but no other means are not allowed. The course is taught in German.
751-0206-00LApplied Laboratory Techniques in Agricultural Sciences Restricted registration - show details
The course is compulsory for students in 5th semester BSc Agricultural Sciences.
4 credits4PG. Broggini, N. Buchmann, K. Giller, M. Hartmann, B. McDonald, S. Neuenschwander, M. Saenz de Juano Ribes, B. Studer, A. Walter
AbstractDie Lehrveranstaltung ist zweiteilig aus einem Laborpraktikum und einem angewandten Methodentraining aufgebaut. Im Laborpraktikum werden an 6 Kurstagen die wichtigsten Techniken der Molekularbiologie gelehrt. Das folgende Methodentraining findet an 5 Kurstagen im Block in einer der beteiligten Forschungsgruppen statt, um die wichtigsten Methoden aus dem jeweiligen Fachgebiet praxisnah anzuwenden.
Objective- Aneignung von guter Laborpraxis (Sicherheit, Effizienz, Qualität und Dokumentation)

- Erlernen der wichtigsten Labor- und Feldmethoden in den Agrarwissenschaften sowie deren korrekte und sichere Anwendung

- Vertieftes Verständnis von molekularen, physiologischen und biochemischen Prozessen in aktuellen agrarwissenschaftlichen Themenbereichen

- Aneignung von Kompetenzen für zukünftige Bachelor-, Master-, und Doktorarbeiten

- Kritische Beurteilung der angewandten Methoden für verantwortungsvolle Forschung
ContentMolekularbiologisches Laborpraktikum: DNA Extraktion, DNA Quantifizierung, PCR, Molekulare Marker, Gelelektrophorese, DNA Sequenzierung, Bioinformatik, qPCR

Angewandtes Methodentraining: Inhalte definiert durch die jeweiligen Arbeitsgruppen
Lecture notesLaborjournal
LiteratureWird einsprechend den Kursinhalten abgegeben.
751-3700-00LPlant Ecophysiology Information 2 credits2VN. Buchmann, A. Gessler, M. Gharun, A. Walter
AbstractThe general theme of this course is the effect of environmental factors (such as light, temperature, relative humidity, CO2 concentrations, etc.) on plant physiology: water uptake and transport, transpiration, CO2 gas exchange of plants (photosynthesis, respiration), growth and C allocation, yield and production, stress physiology. Lab and field measurements are is included.
ObjectiveThe students will understand the impact of environmental factors on plant physiology and will learn the theoretical basis and terminology of plant ecophysiology that is necessary to analyze yield potentials in agriculture. The students will learn about classical and latest studies in plant ecophysiology and will have hands-on experiences with equipment used in plant ecophysiology.
ContentDas Ziel vieler landwirtschaftlicher Managemententscheidungen, d. h., das Erhöhen der Produktivität und des Ertrages, basiert häufig auf Reaktionen der Pflanzen auf Umweltfaktoren, z. B. Nährstoff- und Wasserangebot, Licht, etc. Daher werden in diesem Kurs der Einfluss von Umweltfaktoren auf die pflanzliche Physiologie behandelt, z. B. auf den Gaswechsel von Pflanzen (Photosynthese, Atmung, Transpiration), auf die Nährstoff- und Wasseraufnahme und den -Transport in Pflanzen, auf das Wachstum, den Ertrag und die C-Allokation, auf die Produktion und Qualität der produzierten Biomasse. Anhand der wichtigsten Pflanzenarten in Schweizer Graslandökosystemen werden diese theoretischen Kenntnisse vertieft und Aspekte der Bewirtschaftung (Schnitt, Düngung, etc.) angesprochen.
Lecture notesHandouts stehen online.
LiteratureLarcher 1994, Lambers et al. 2008, Schulze et al. 2002
Prerequisites / NoticeDieser Kurs basiert auf Grundlagen der Pflanzenbestimmung und der Pflanzenphysiologie. Er ist Basis für die Veranstaltungen „Futterbau“ und „Graslandsysteme“.
751-4003-01LCurrent Topics in Grassland Sciences (HS) Information 2 credits2SN. Buchmann
AbstractResearch results in agro- and forest ecosystem sciences will be presented by experienced researchers as well as Ph.D. and graduate students. Citation classics as well as recent research results will be discussed. Topics will range from plant ecophysiology, biodiversity and biogeochemistry to management aspects in agro- and forest ecosystems.
ObjectiveStudents will be able to understand and evaluate experimental design and data interpretation of on-going studies, be able to critically analyze published research results, practice to present and discuss results in the public, and gain a broad knowledge of recent research and current topics in agro- and forest ecosystem sciences.
ContentResearch results in agro- and forest ecosystem sciences will be presented by experienced researchers as well as Ph.D. and graduate students. Citation classics as well as recent research results will be discussed. Topics will range from plant ecophysiology, biodiversity and biogeochemistry to management aspects in agro- and forest ecosystems.
Lecture notesnone
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites: Basic knowledge of plant ecophysiology, terrestrial ecology and management of agro- and forest ecosystems. Course will be taught in English.
751-5101-00LBiogeochemistry and Sustainable Management Information 2 credits2GN. Buchmann, C. Bachofen, V. Klaus
AbstractThis course focuses on the interactions between ecology, biogeochemistry and management of agro- and forest ecosystems, thus, coupled human-environmental systems. Students learn how human impacts on ecosystems via management or global change are mainly driven by effects on biogeochemical cycles and thus ecosystem functioning, but also about feedback mechanisms of terrestrial ecosystems.
ObjectiveStudents will know and understand the complex and interacting processes of ecology, biogeochemistry and management of agro- and forest ecosystems, be able to analyze and evaluate the various impacts of different management practices under different environmental conditions, based on real-life data, and be able to coordinate and work successfully in small (interdisciplinary) teams.
ContentAgroecosystems and forest ecosystems play a major role in all landscapes, either for production purposes, ecological areas or for recreation. The human impact of any management on the environment is mainly driven by effects on biogeochemical cycles. Effects of global change impacts will also act via biogeochemistry at the soil-biosphere-atmosphere-interface. Thus, ecosystem functioning, i.e., the interactions between ecology, biogeochemistry and management of terrestrial systems, is the science topic for this course.

Students will gain profound knowledge about nutrient cycles in managed and unmanaged grassland, cropland and forest ecosystems. Responses of agro- and forest ecosystems to the environment, e.g., to climate, anthropogenic deposition, major disturbances, soil nutrients or competition of plants and microorganisms, but also feedback mechanisms of ecosystems on (micro)climate, soils or vegetation patterns will be studied. Different management practices will be investigated and assessed in terms of production and quality of yield (ecosystem goods and services), but also in regard to their effect on the environment, e.g., greenhouse gas budgets. Thus, students will learn about the complex interactions of a coupled human-environmental system.

Students will work with real-life data from the long-term measurement network Swiss FluxNet. Data from the intensively managed grassland site Chamau will be used to investigate the biosphere-atmosphere exchange of CO2, H2O, N2O and CH4. Greenhouse gas budgets will be calculated for different time periods and in relation to management over the course of a year. In a final report, students will compare their findings to the forest site Davos.
Lecture notesHandouts will be available on the webpage of the course.
LiteratureWill be discussed in class.
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites: Attendance of introductory courses in plant ecophysiology, ecology, and grassland or forest sciences. Knowledge of data analyses and statistics. Course will be taught in English.
751-5125-00LStable Isotope Ecology of Terrestrial Ecosystems Information Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 20.
2 credits2GR. A. Werner, N. Buchmann, A. Gessler
AbstractThis course provides an overview about the applicability of stable isotopes (carbon 13C, nitrogen 15N, oxygen 18O and hydrogen 2H) to process-oriented ecological research. Topics focus on stable isotopes as indicators for the origin of pools and fluxes, partitioning of composite fluxes as well as to trace and integrate processes. In addition, students carry out a small project during lab sessions.
ObjectiveStudents will be familiar with basic and advanced applications of stable isotopes in studies on plants, soils, water and trace gases, know the relevant approaches, concepts and recent results in stable isotope ecology, know how to combine classical and modern techniques to solve ecophysiological or ecological problems, learn to design, carry out and interpret a small IsoProject, practice to search and analyze literature as well as to give an oral presentation.
ContentThe analyses of stable isotopes often provide insights into ecophysiological and ecological processes that otherwise would not be available with classical methods only. Stable isotopes proved useful to determine origin of pools and fluxes in ecosystems, to partition composite fluxes and to integrate processes spatially and temporally.

This course will provide an introduction to the applicability of stable isotopes to ecological research questions. Topics will focus on carbon (13C), nitrogen (15N), oxygen (18O) and hydrogen (2H) at natural isotope abundance and tracer levels. Lectures will be supplemented by intensive laboratory sessions, short presentations by students and computer exercises.
Lecture notesHandouts will be available on the webpage of the course.
LiteratureWill be discussed in class.
Prerequisites / NoticeThis course is based on fundamental knowledge about plant ecophysiology, soil science, and ecology in general. Course will be taught in English.