From 2 November 2020, the autumn semester 2020 will take place online. Exceptions: Courses that can only be carried out with on-site presence. Please note the information provided by the lecturers via e-mail.

Norman Sieroka: Catalogue data in Autumn Semester 2016

Name PD Dr. Norman Sieroka
FieldPhilosphy
Address
Professur für Philosophie
ETH Zürich, CLW C 1
Clausiusstrasse 49
8092 Zürich
SWITZERLAND
E-mailsieroka@phil.gess.ethz.ch
URLhttp://www.uni-bremen.de/theophil/sieroka
DepartmentHumanities, Social and Political Sciences
RelationshipPrivatdozent

NumberTitleECTSHoursLecturers
851-0144-19LPhilosophy of Time
Does not take place this semester.
Particularly suitable for students of D-BIOL, D-INFK, D-MATH, D-PHYS
3 credits2VN. Sieroka
AbstractThis course provides an introduction to philosophical issues surrounding the concept of time. We will treat topics such as: the existence of past, present, and future; the possibility of time travel; the constitution of time consciousness and its possible neurophysiological counterparts; temporal biases in the conduct of our lives; responsibility to future and past generations.
ObjectiveBy the end of the course students are able to describe and compare different theories and concepts of time (physical time, perceptual time, historical time ...). They are able to identify and examine issues concerning time as they occur in various philosophical subdisciplines - especially in philosophy of science, philosophy of mind, metaphysics, and ethics. Students are in a position to critically discuss and evaluate the repercussions of these issues in broader scientific and social contexts.
Part of the course reflects on methods and contents from physics, neuroscience/cognitive science, and logic.
851-0144-20LPhilosophical Aspects of Quantum Physics
Particularly suitable for students of D-CHAB, D-PHYS
3 credits2SN. Sieroka, R. Renner
AbstractThis course provides an introduction to philosophical issues surrounding quantum physics. In particular, we will examine different interpretations of quantum mechanics (such as the many-world interpretation) and the transition between the quantum and the classical physical realm (here phenomena such as decoherence will be highlighted).
ObjectiveBy the end of the course students are able to describe and compare different interpretations of quantum mechanics. They are able to identify and examine issues concerning these different interpretations and issues concerning the transition between quantum and classical descriptions in physics. Students are in a position to critically discuss and evaluate the repercussions of these issues in broader scientific contexts.