Felix Oliver Friedrich Wicker: Catalogue data in Spring Semester 2017

Name Dr. Felix Oliver Friedrich Wicker
Address
Dep. Informatik
ETH Zürich, UNG F 14
Universitätstrasse 19
8092 Zürich
SWITZERLAND
Telephone+41 44 632 83 12
E-mailfelix.friedrich@inf.ethz.ch
URLhttps://people.inf.ethz.ch/felixf
DepartmentComputer Science
RelationshipLecturer

NumberTitleECTSHoursLecturers
252-0002-AALData Structures and Algorithms Information
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
7 credits15RF. O. Friedrich Wicker
AbstractThis course is about fundamental algorithm design paradigms (such as induction, divide-and-conquer, backtracking, dynamic programming), classic algorithmic problems (such as sorting and searching), and data structures (such as lists, hashing, search trees). The connection between algorithms and data structures is explained for geometric and graph problems.
ObjectiveAn understanding of the design and analysis of fundamental algorithms and data structures. Knowledge regarding chances, problems and limits of parallel and concurrent programming. Deeper insight into a modern programming model by means of the programming language C++.
Prerequisites / NoticeThis is a self-study course. The relevant topics are those of the underlying course taught in the previous spring semester. A course summary with literature in English is provided at the homepage of course 252-0002-00L
252-0002-00LData Structures and Algorithms Information 7 credits4V + 2UF. O. Friedrich Wicker
AbstractThis course is about fundamental algorithm design paradigms (such as induction, divide-and-conquer, backtracking, dynamic programming), classic algorithmic problems (such as sorting and searching), and data structures (such as lists, hashing, search trees). Moreover, an introduction to parallel programming is provided. The programming model of C++ will be discussed in some depth.
ObjectiveAn understanding of the design and analysis of fundamental algorithms and data structures. Knowledge regarding chances, problems and limits of parallel and concurrent programming. Deeper insight into a modern programming model by means of the programming language C++.
ContentFundamental algorithms and data structures are presented and analyzed. Firstly, this comprises design paradigms for the development of algorithms such as induction, divide-and-conquer, backtracking and dynamic programming and classical algorithmic problems such as searching and sorting. Secondly, data structures for different purposes are presented, such as linked lists, hash tables, balanced search trees, heaps and union-find structures. The relationship and tight coupling between algorithms and data structures is illustrated with geometric problems and graph algorithms.

In the part about parallel programming, parallel architectures are discussed conceptually (multicore, vectorization, pipelining). Parallel programming concepts are presented (Amdahl's and Gustavson's laws, task/data parallelism, scheduling). Problems of concurrency are analyzed (Data races, bad interleavings, memory reordering). Process synchronisation and communication in a shared memory system is explained (mutual exclusion, semaphores, monitors, condition variables). Progress conditions are analysed (freedom from deadlock, starvation, lock- and wait-freedom). The concepts are underpinned with examples of concurrent and parallel programs and with parallel algorithms.

The programming model of C++ is discussed in some depth. The RAII (Resource Allocation is Initialization) principle will be explained. Exception handling, functors and lambda expression and generic prorgamming with templates are further examples of this part. The implementation of parallel and concurrent algorithm with C++ is also part of the exercises (e.g. threads, tasks, mutexes, condition variables, promises and futures).
LiteratureCormen, Leiserson, Rivest, and Stein: Introduction to Algorithms, 3rd ed., MIT Press, 2009. ISBN 978-0-262-03384-8 (recommended text)

Maurice Herlihy, Nir Shavit, The Art of Multiprocessor Programming, Elsevier, 2012.
B. Stroustrup, The C++ Programming Language (4th Edition) Addison-Wesley, 2013.

B. Stroustrup, The C++ Programming Language (4th Edition) Addison-Wesley, 2013.
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites:
Lecture Series 252-0835-00L Informatik I or equivalent knowledge in programming with C++.
252-0835-AALComputer Science I Information
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
4 credits9RF. O. Friedrich Wicker
AbstractThe course covers the fundamental concepts of computer programming with a focus on systematic algorithmic problem solving. Teached language is C++. No programming experience is required.
ObjectivePrimary educational objective is to learn programming with C++. When successfully attended the course, students have a good command of the mechanisms to construct a program. They know the fundamental control and data structures and understand how an algorithmic problem is mapped to a computer program. They have an idea of what happens "behind the secenes" when a program is translated and executed.
Secondary goals are an algorithmic computational thinking, undestanding the possibilities and limits of programming and to impart the way of thinking of a computer scientist.
ContentThe course covers fundamental data types, expressions and statements, (Limits of) computer arithmetic, control statements, functions, arrays, structural types and pointers. The part on object orientiation deals with classes, inheritance and polymorphy, simple dynamic data types are introduced as examples.
In general, the concepts provided in the course are motivated and illustrated with algorithms and applications.
LiteratureBjarne Stroustrup: Programming:Principles and Practice Using C++, Addison-Wesley, 2014
Stephen Prata: C++ Primer Plus, Sixth Edition, Addison Wesley, 2012
Andrew Koenig and Barbara E. Moo: Accelerated C++, Addison-Wesley, 2000
Bjarne Stroustrup: The C++ Programming Language (4th Edition) Addison-Wesley, 2013
Bjarne Stroustrup: The Design and Evolution of C++, Addison-Wesley, 1994
252-0846-AALComputer Science II Information
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
4 credits9RF. O. Friedrich Wicker
AbstractTogether with the introductory course Informatics I this course provides the foundations of programming and databases. This course particularly covers algorithms and data structures and basics about design and implementation of databases. Programming language used in this course is Java.
ObjectiveBasing on the knowledge covered by lecture Informatics I, the primary educational objectives of this course are
- constructive knowledge of data structures and algorithms amd
- the knowledge of relational databases and
When successfully attended the course, students have a good command of the mechanisms to construct an object oriented program. They know the typically used control and data structures and understand how an algorithmic problem is mapped to a sufficiently efficient computer program. They have an idea of what happens "behind the secenes" when a program is translated and executed. The know how to write database queries and how to design simple databases.
Secondary goals are an algorithmic computational thinking, undestanding the possibilities and limits of programming and to impart the way of thinking of a computer scientist.
ContentWe discuss the paradigm of object oriented programming, typical data structures and algorithms and design principles for the design and usage of relational databases.
More generally, formal thinking and the need for abstraction and importance of appropriate modelling capabilities will be motivated. The course emphasizes applied computer science. Concrete topics are complexity of algorithms, divide and conquer-principles, recursion, sort- and search-algorithms, backtracking, data structures (lists, stacks, queues, trees) and data management in relational data bases.
Lecture notesThe slides will be available for download on the course home page.
LiteratureRobert Sedgewick, Kevin Wayne, Introduction to Programming in Java: An Interdisciplinary Approach, Addison-Wesley, 2008

T. Cormen, C. Leiserson, R. Rivest, C. Stein, Introduction to Algorithms , 3rd ed., MIT Press, 2009
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites are knowledge and programming experience according to course 252-0845-00 Computer Science I (D-BAUG).
252-0846-00LComputer Science II Information 4 credits2V + 2UF. O. Friedrich Wicker
AbstractTogether with the introductory course Informatics I this course provides the foundations of programming and databases. This course particularly covers algorithms and data structures and basics about design and implementation of databases. Programming language used in this course is Java.
ObjectiveBasing on the knowledge covered by lecture Informatics I, the primary educational objectives of this course are
- constructive knowledge of data structures and algorithms and
- the knowledge of relational databases.

When successfully attended the course, students have a good command of the mechanisms to construct an object oriented program. They know the typically used control and data structures and understand how an algorithmic problem is mapped to a sufficiently efficient computer program. They have an idea of what happens "behind the secenes" when a program is translated and executed. The know how to write database queries and how to design simple databases.

Secondary goals are an algorithmic computational thinking, undestanding the possibilities and limits of programming and to impart the way of thinking of a computer scientist.
ContentWe discuss typical data structures and algorithms, the paradigm of object oriented programming, and design principles for the design and usage of relational databases.

More generally, formal thinking and the need for abstraction and importance of appropriate modeling capabilities will be motivated. The course emphasizes applied computer science. Concrete topics are complexity of algorithms, divide and conquer-principles, recursion, sort- and search-algorithms, backtracking, data structures (lists, stacks, queues, trees) and data management with lists and tables in relational data bases.
Lecture notesThe slides will be available for download on the course home page.
LiteratureRobert Sedgewick, Kevin Wayne, Introduction to Programming in Java: An Interdisciplinary Approach, Addison-Wesley, 2008

T. Cormen, C. Leiserson, R. Rivest, C. Stein, Introduction to Algorithms , 3rd ed., MIT Press, 2009
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites are knowledge and programming experience according to course 252-0845-00 Computer Science I (D-BAUG).