Felix Oliver Friedrich: Catalogue data in Spring Semester 2015

Name Dr. Felix Oliver Friedrich
Address
Dep. Informatik
ETH Zürich, UNG F 14
Universitätstrasse 19
8092 Zürich
SWITZERLAND
Telephone+41 44 632 83 12
E-mailfelix.friedrich@inf.ethz.ch
URLhttp://www.inf.ethz.ch/personal/felixf
DepartmentComputer Science
RelationshipLecturer

NumberTitleECTSHoursLecturers
252-0024-00LParallel Programming Information 7 credits4V + 2UO. Hilliges, F. O. Friedrich
AbstractIntroduction to parallel programming: deterministic and non-deterministic programs, models for parallel computation, synchronization, communication, and fairness.
ObjectiveThe student should learn how to write a correct parallel program, how to measure its efficiency, and how to reason about a parallel program. Student should become familiar with issues, problems, pitfalls, and solutions related to the construction of parallel programs. Labs provide an opportunity to gain experience with threads, libraries for thread management in modern programming lanugages (e.g., Java, C#) and with the execution of parallel programs on multi-processor/multi-core computers.
252-0835-AALComputer Science I Information
Enrolment only for MSc students who need this course as additional requirement.
4 credits9RF. O. Friedrich
AbstractThe course covers the fundamental concepts of computer programming with a focus on systematic algorithmic problem solving. Teached language is C++. No programming experience is required.
ObjectivePrimary educational objective is to learn programming with C++. When successfully attended the course, students have a good command of the mechanisms to construct a program. They know the fundamental control and data structures and understand how an algorithmic problem is mapped to a computer program. They have an idea of what happens "behind the secenes" when a program is translated and executed.
Secondary goals are an algorithmic computational thinking, undestanding the possibilities and limits of programming and to impart the way of thinking of a computer scientist.
ContentThe course covers fundamental data types, expressions and statements, (Limits of) computer arithmetic, control statements, functions, arrays, structural types and pointers. The part on object orientiation deals with classes, inheritance and polymorphy, simple dynamic data types are introduced as examples.
In general, the concepts provided in the course are motivated and illustrated with algorithms and applications.
LiteratureBjarne Stroustrup: Programming:Principles and Practice Using C++, Addison-Wesley, 2014
Stephen Prata: C++ Primer Plus, Sixth Edition, Addison Wesley, 2012
Andrew Koenig and Barbara E. Moo: Accelerated C++, Addison-Wesley, 2000
Bjarne Stroustrup: The C++ Programming Language (4th Edition) Addison-Wesley, 2013
Bjarne Stroustrup: The Design and Evolution of C++, Addison-Wesley, 1994
252-0846-AALComputer Science II Information
Enrolment only for MSc students who need this course as additional requirement.
4 credits9RF. O. Friedrich
AbstractTogether with the introductory course Informatics I this course provides the foundations of programming and databases. This course particularly covers algorithms and data structures and basics about design and implementation of databases. Programming language used in this course is Java.
ObjectiveBasing on the knowledge covered by lecture Informatics I, the primary educational objectives of this course are
- to learn object oriented programming
- constructive knowledge of data structures and algorithms
- the knowledge of relational databases and
- their connection with a programming environment.
When successfully attended the course, students have a good command of the mechanisms to construct an object oriented program. They know the typically used control and data structures and understand how an algorithmic problem is mapped to a sufficiently efficient computer program. They have an idea of what happens "behind the secenes" when a program is translated and executed. The know how to write database queries and how to design simple databases.
Secondary goals are an algorithmic computational thinking, undestanding the possibilities and limits of programming and to impart the way of thinking of a computer scientist.
ContentWe discuss the paradigm of obejct oriented programming, typical data structures and algorithme and design principles for the design and usage of relational databases.
More generally, formal thinking and the need for abstraction and importance of appropriate modelling capabilities will be motivated. The course emphasizes applied computer science. Concrete topics are complexity of algorithms, divide and conquer-principles, recursion, sort- and search-algorithms, backtracking, data structures (lists, stacks, queues, trees) and data management with lists and tables in relational data bases.
Lecture notesThe slides will be available for download on the course home page.
LiteratureRobert Sedgewick, Kevin Wayne, Einführung in die Programmierung mit Java. Pearson, 2011

Robert Sedgewick, Kevin Wayne, Introduction to Programming in Java: An Interdisciplinary Approach, Addison-Wesley, 2008

Christian Ullenboo, Java ist auch eine Insel, http://openbook.galileocomputing.de/javainsel/

Guido Krüger, Heiko Hansen, Handbuch der Java-Programmierung
Standard Edition Version 7, Addison-Wesley, 2011, http://www.javabuch.de

Thomas Ottmann, Peter Widmayer, Algorithmen und Datenstrukturen, Springer 2012
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites are knowledge and programming experience according to course 252-0845-00 Computer Science I (D-BAUG).
252-0846-00LComputer Science II Information 4 credits2V + 2UF. O. Friedrich
AbstractTogether with the introductory course Informatics I this course provides the foundations of programming and databases. This course particularly covers algorithms and data structures and basics about design and implementation of databases. Programming language used in this course is Java.
ObjectiveBasing on the knowledge covered by lecture Informatics I, the primary educational objectives of this course are
- to learn object oriented programming
- constructive knowledge of data structures and algorithms
- the knowledge of relational databases and
- their connection with a programming environment.
When successfully attended the course, students have a good command of the mechanisms to construct an object oriented program. They know the typically used control and data structures and understand how an algorithmic problem is mapped to a sufficiently efficient computer program. They have an idea of what happens "behind the secenes" when a program is translated and executed. The know how to write database queries and how to design simple databases.
Secondary goals are an algorithmic computational thinking, undestanding the possibilities and limits of programming and to impart the way of thinking of a computer scientist.
ContentWe discuss the paradigm of obejct oriented programming, typical data structures and algorithme and design principles for the design and usage of relational databases.
More generally, formal thinking and the need for abstraction and importance of appropriate modelling capabilities will be motivated. The course emphasizes applied computer science. Concrete topics are complexity of algorithms, divide and conquer-principles, recursion, sort- and search-algorithms, backtracking, data structures (lists, stacks, queues, trees) and data management with lists and tables in relational data bases.
Lecture notesThe slides will be available for download on the course home page.
LiteratureRobert Sedgewick, Kevin Wayne, Einführung in die Programmierung mit Java. Pearson, 2011

Robert Sedgewick, Kevin Wayne, Introduction to Programming in Java: An Interdisciplinary Approach, Addison-Wesley, 2008

Christian Ullenboo, Java ist auch eine Insel, http://openbook.galileocomputing.de/javainsel/

Guido Krüger, Heiko Hansen, Handbuch der Java-Programmierung
Standard Edition Version 7, Addison-Wesley, 2011, http://www.javabuch.de

Thomas Ottmann, Peter Widmayer, Algorithmen und Datenstrukturen, Springer 2012
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites are knowledge and programming experience according to course 252-0845-00 Computer Science I (D-BAUG).