Reto Knutti: Katalogdaten im Frühjahrssemester 2016

NameHerr Prof. Dr. Reto Knutti
LehrgebietKlimaphysik
Adresse
Institut für Atmosphäre und Klima
ETH Zürich, CHN N 12.1
Universitätstrasse 16
8092 Zürich
SWITZERLAND
Telefon+41 44 632 35 40
E-Mailreto.knutti@env.ethz.ch
URLhttp://www.iac.ethz.ch/people/knuttir
DepartementUmweltsystemwissenschaften
BeziehungOrdentlicher Professor

NummerTitelECTSUmfangDozierende
151-0928-00LCO2 Capture and Storage and the Industry of Carbon-Based Resources4 KP3GM. Mazzotti, L. Bretschger, R. Knutti, C. Müller, M. Repmann
KurzbeschreibungCarbon-based resources (coal, oil, gas): origin, production, processing, resource economics. Climate change: science, policies. CCS systems: CO2 capture in power/industrial plants, CO2 transport and storage. Besides technical details, economical, legal and societal aspects are considered (e.g. electricity markets, barriers to deployment).
LernzielThe goal of the lecture is to introduce carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) systems, the technical solutions developed so far and the current research questions. This is done in the context of the origin, production, processing and economics of carbon-based resources, and of climate change issues. After this course, students are familiar with important technical and non-technical issues related to use of carbon resources, climate change, and CCS as a transitional mitigation measure.

The class will be structured in 2 hours of lecture and one hour of exercises/discussion. At the end of the semester a group project is planned.
InhaltBoth the Swiss and the European energy system face a number of significant challenges over the coming decades. The major concerns are the security and economy of energy supply and the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. Fossil fuels will continue to satisfy the largest part of the energy demand in the medium term for Europe, and they could become part of the Swiss energy portfolio due to the planned phase out of nuclear power. Carbon capture and storage is considered an important option for the decarbonization of the power sector and it is the only way to reduce emissions in CO2 intensive industrial plants (e.g. cement- and steel production).
Building on the previously offered class "Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage (CCS)", we have added two specific topics: 1) the industry of carbon-based resources, i.e. what is upstream of the CCS value chain, and 2) the science of climate change, i.e. why and how CO2 emissions are a problem.
The course is devided into four parts:
I) The first part will be dedicated to the origin, production, and processing of conventional as well as of unconventional carbon-based resources.
II) The second part will comprise two lectures from experts in the field of climate change sciences and resource economics.
III) The third part will explain the technical details of CO2 capture (current and future options) as well as of CO2 storage and utilization options, taking again also economical, legal, and sociatel aspects into consideration.
IV) The fourth part will comprise two lectures from industry experts, one with focus on electricity markets, the other on the experiences made with CCS technologies in the industry.
Throughout the class, time will be allocated to work on a number of tasks related to the theory, individually, in groups, or in plenum. Moreover, the students will apply the theoretical knowledge acquired during the course in a case study covering all the topics.
SkriptPower Point slides and distributed handouts
LiteraturIPCC AR5 Climate Change 2014: Synthesis Report, 2014. www.ipcc.ch/report/ar5/syr/

IPCC Special Report on Carbon dioxide Capture and Storage, 2005. www.ipcc.ch/activity/srccs/index.htm

The Global Status of CCS: 2014. Published by the Global CCS Institute, Nov 2014.
http://www.globalccsinstitute.com/publications/global-status-ccs-2014
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesExternal lecturers from the industry and other institutes will contribute with specialized lectures according to the schedule distributed at the beginning of the semester.
651-4095-01LColloquium Atmosphere and Climate 1 Information 1 KP1KE. M. Fischer, C. Schär, N. Gruber, R. Knutti, U. Lohmann, T. Peter, T. Schneider, S. I. Seneviratne, K. Steffen, H. Wernli, M. Wild
KurzbeschreibungThe colloquium is a series of scientific talks by prominent invited speakers assembling interested students and researchers from around Zürich. Students take part of the scientific discussions.
LernzielThe colloquium is a series of scientific talks by prominent invited speakers assembling interested students and researchers from around Zürich. Students take part of the scientific discussions.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesTo acquire credit points for this colloquium, please visit the course's web page and sign up for one of the groups.
651-4095-02LColloquium Atmosphere and Climate 2 Information 1 KP1KE. M. Fischer, C. Schär, N. Gruber, R. Knutti, U. Lohmann, T. Peter, T. Schneider, S. I. Seneviratne, K. Steffen, H. Wernli, M. Wild
KurzbeschreibungThe colloquium is a series of scientific talks by prominent invited speakers assembling interested students and researchers from around Zürich. Students take part of the scientific discussions.
LernzielThe colloquium is a series of scientific talks by prominent invited speakers assembling interested students and researchers from around Zürich. Students take part of the scientific discussions.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesTo acquire credit points for this colloquium, please visit the course's web page and sign up for one of the groups.
651-4095-03LColloquium Atmosphere and Climate 3 Information 1 KP1KE. M. Fischer, C. Schär, N. Gruber, R. Knutti, U. Lohmann, T. Peter, T. Schneider, S. I. Seneviratne, K. Steffen, H. Wernli, M. Wild
KurzbeschreibungThe colloquium is a series of scientific talks by prominent invited speakers assembling interested students and researchers from around Zürich. Students take part of the scientific discussions.
LernzielThe colloquium is a series of scientific talks by prominent invited speakers assembling interested students and researchers from around Zürich. Students take part of the scientific discussions.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesTo acquire credit points for this colloquium, please visit the course's web page and sign up for one of the groups.
701-0016-00LPhilosophical Issues in Understanding Global Change Belegung eingeschränkt - Details anzeigen
Maximale Teilnehmerzahl: 9.
MSc Studierenden und Doktoranden von D-ERDW und D-USYS haben Vorrang.
2 KP1SG. Hirsch Hadorn, C. J. Baumberger, R. Knutti
KurzbeschreibungThis course investigates the potentials and limitations of models and computer simulations that aim at understanding global change. We also discuss the limitations of observations and the role of results from models and computer simulations in decision making on policy for sustainable development.
LernzielStudents learn to reflect on concepts, methods, arguments and knowledge claims based upon computer simulations by critically analysing and assessing topical and recent research papers from philosophy and the sciences.
InhaltGlobal change is not just a major real-world problem, but also a challenge for the natural and social sciences. The challenge is due to the spatial and temporal scales considered, the diversity, complexity and variability of aspects involved, and, last but not least, the descriptive, pragmatic and normative questions raised by global change. This course investigates the potentials and limits of research methods such as modelling for understanding global change with a focus on climate change, and it discusses the role of results from modelling and computer simulations in decision making on policy for sustainable development.

In the seminar, topics such as the following are discussed:
(1) What is a model? What are purposes and potential pitfalls of modelling? What are the basic steps of modelling?
(2) What are computer simulations and what is their relation to models? How do we learn about the real-world by running computer simulations? How do computer simulations differ from classical experiments?
(3) What do data tell us about the problem we are investigating? What are the difficulties in assessing and interpreting data?
(4) What is the role of results from modelling and computer simulation in decision making on policy for sustainable development? Which questions for policy can be answered in this way? What are the consequences of uncertainties for policy making?
SkriptA set of papers from philosophy and from science to be discussed and a guide to analyzing texts are provided.
LiteraturThe papers to be discussed in the seminar sessions and guidelines about the analysis of texts are provided.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesThis seminar is offered at the ETH and the University of Bern. There are four seminar sessions, each lasting 4 hours. The sessions take place from 13:45 to 17:15. The places alternate between Zurich and Bern in the following way
18.03. Berne UniS A-119 Schanzeneckstrasse 1
08.04. Zurich CHN P12 Universitätstrasse 16
29.04. Berne UniS A-119 Schanzeneckstrasse 1
20.05. Zurich CHN P12 Universitätstrasse 16

In the first meeting, participants are introduced to methods on how to read a philosophical paper. For each meeting, every participant answers a couple of questions about the paper scheduled for discussion. This preparation will take about 4-5 hours for each paper. Answers have to be sent to the lecturers before the seminar takes place and provide a basis for the discussion. All students that have subscribed will get the questions and text for the first meeting by email.
Seminar discussions are chaired jointly by lecturers from philosophy and from science. Interest in interdisciplinary reading and discussion is a prerequisite. The number of participants from ETH is limited to 9, in total to 18.
Requirements for 2 CP: (1) Answer the questions about the text before the meetings (4 times), (2) At the end of the semester, write a final essay of about 2-3 pages pages about a topic discussed in our meetings. This essay should be delivered until 3 weeks after the end of the spring semester.
Master or PhD students of D-USYS or students of Atmosph. + Climate Science MSc have priority.
701-0412-AALClimate Systems
Belegung ist NUR erlaubt für MSc Studierende, die diese Lerneinheit als Auflagenfach verfügt haben.

Alle anderen Studierenden (u.a. auch Mobilitätsstudierende, Doktorierende) können diese Lerneinheit NICHT belegen.
3 KP6RR. Knutti
KurzbeschreibungIntroduction of the most important components of the climate systems and their interactions.
LernzielStudents have a basic understanding of the global energy balance, radiation budget, boundary, layer, atmosphere, ocean, biosphere, land-surface coupling, cryosphere, carbon cycle, climate variability, climate of the past and anthropogenic climate change, and they are able to apply this to solve simple quantitative problems and answer qualitative questions.
701-0412-00LKlimasysteme3 KP2GR. Knutti
KurzbeschreibungDie wichtigsten physikalischen Komponenten des Klimasystems und deren Wechselwirkungen werden eingeführt. Vor dem Hintergrund der Klimageschichte - und variabilität werden die Mechanismen des anthropogenen Klimawandels analysiert. Absolvierende des Kurses sind in der Lage, einfache Problemstellungen aus dem Bereich der Klimasysteme zu identifizieren und erläutern.
LernzielStudierende können:
- die wichtigsten physikalischen Komponenten des goblaben Klimasystems beschreiben und ihre Wechselwirkungen skizzieren.
- die Mechanismen des anthropogenen Klimawandels erklären.
einfache Problemstellungen aus dem Bereich der Klimasysteme identifizieren und erläutern.
SkriptKopien der Folien werden elektronisch zur Verfuegung gestellt.
LiteraturEine vollständige Literaturliste wird abgegeben. Insbesondere empfohlen sind:
- Hartmann, D., 1994: Global Physical Climatology. Academic Press, London, 411 pp.
- Peixoto, J.P. and A.H. Oort, 1992: Physics of Climate. American Institute of Physics, New York, 520 pp.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesDozierende: Reto Knutti, mehrere Vorträge zu Spezialthemen von anderen Dozenten
Unterrichtssprache: deutsch
Sprache der Folien: englisch
701-1252-00LClimate Change Uncertainty and Risk: From Probabilistic Forecasts to Economics of Climate Adaptation3 KP2V + 1UR. Knutti, D. N. Bresch
KurzbeschreibungThe course introduces the concepts of predictability, probability, uncertainty and probabilistic risk modelling and their application to climate modeling and the economics of climate adaptation.
LernzielStudents will acquire knowledge in uncertainty and risk quantification (probabilistic modelling) and an understanding of the economics of climate adaptation. They will become able to construct their own uncertainty and risk assessment models (MATLAB), hence basic understanding of scientific programming forms a prerequisite of the course.
InhaltThe first part of the course covers methods to quantify uncertainty in detecting and attributing human influence on climate change and to generate probabilistic climate change projections on global to regional scales. Model evaluation, calibration and structural error are discussed. In the second part, quantification of risks associated with local climate impacts and the economics of different baskets of climate adaptation options are assessed – leading to informed decisions to optimally allocate resources. Such pre-emptive risk management allows evaluating a mix of prevention, preparation, response, recovery, and (financial) risk transfer actions, resulting in an optimal balance of public and private contributions to risk management, aiming at a more resilient society.
The course provides an introduction to the following themes:
1) basics of probabilistic modelling and quantification of uncertainty from global climate change to local impacts of extreme events
2) methods to optimize and constrain model parameters using observations
3) risk management from identification (perception) and understanding (assessment, modelling) to actions (prevention, preparation, response, recovery, risk transfer)
4) basics of economic evaluation, economic decision making in the presence of climate risks and pre-emptive risk management to optimally allocate resources
SkriptPowerpoint slides will be made available
Literatur-
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesHands-on experience with probabilistic climate models and risk models will be acquired in the tutorials; hence basic understanding of scientific programming forms a prerequisite of the course. Basic understanding of the climate system, e.g. as covered in the course 'Klimasysteme' is required.

Examination: graded tutorials during the semester (benotete Semesterleistung)
860-0017-00LArgumentation and Science Communication Belegung eingeschränkt - Details anzeigen
Number of participants limited to 10.

MSc students, PhD students and postdocs with a science and technology background have priority.
6 KP3GA. Wenger, C. J. Baumberger, M. Dunn Cavelty, G. Hirsch Hadorn, U. Jasper, R. Knutti
KurzbeschreibungAnalyzing and communicating the aims and ethical implications of scientific research is an essential element at the intersection of science, technology and policy making. This course is split into two modules which focus (1) on arguing about ethical aspects and scientific uncertainties of policies, and (2) on communicating scientific results to policy-makers and the wider public.
LernzielStudents learn to consider uncertainties in inferences from computer simulation results to real-world policy problems and acquire an understanding of ethical positions and arguments concerning values, justice and risks related to policies. They learn how to analyze the particular prerequisites for the successful dissemination of scientific results to policy-makers and the wider public.
InhaltAnalyzing and communicating the aims and ethical implications of scientific research is an essential element at the intersection of science, technology and policy making. In the first module of this course, we will provide a framework for considering uncertainties in inferences from computer simulation results to real-world policy problems. Moreover, we will introduce and discuss ethical positions and arguments concerning values, justice and risks related to policies. Subsequently, we will learn how to clarify concepts as well as how to identify, reconstruct and evaluate arguments and complex argumentations. In the second module, we will analyze the particular prerequisites for the successful dissemination of scientific results to policy-makers and the wider public. To get a better understanding of the expectations and needs of different target groups we will invite guest speakers and professionals from both the media and the policy world to share their experiences and discuss common problems. The final part of this course consists of practical applications and exercises. Proceeding in a 'draft/revise/submit'-manner, students will have to present a scientific project (possibly linked to a case study) in two different formats (e.g. newspaper contribution and policy brief). Faculty will supervise the writing process and provide reviews and comments on drafts (in collaboration with ETHZ Hochschulkommunikation and the Language Center).
Schedule:
W1: Introduction
W2: Computer models and simulations: How do we learn about real-world problems by models and computer simulations? What can we infer from their results for policy advice?
W3: Values: What are the implications of basic distinctions in value theory such as intrinsic vs extrinsic/instrumental values, anthropocentric vs non-anthropocentric values, and value monism vs value pluralism for policy assessments?
W4: Justice: What are the ethical arguments for and against different conceptions of intra- and intergenerational justice, such as egalitarianism, grandfathering, polluter or beneficiary pays principle, and capability approaches?
W5: Risks: What are permissible risks from the perspective of different ethical theories, such as utilitarianism, contractualism, deontological and right-based theories?
W6: Concepts and arguments: Clarification of ambiguous and vague concepts, identification and reconstruction of arguments, types of theoretical and practical arguments
W7: Concepts and arguments: Criteria for good arguments, typical fallacies, use of arguments in discussions
W8: The science of science communication: Basic insights from communication theory
W9: Different Audiences, Different Formats: What are the particular prerequisites for the successful dissemination of scientific results to policy-makers? What are the writing and presentation skills needed?
W10: What are the particular prerequisites for communicating with the wider public? The dos and don'ts of media interaction. What are the benefits and challenges of social media?
W11: Study week: Students work on their two 'praxis projects' and submit two drafts.
W12: Supervision and Revision
W13: Supervision and Revision
W14: Wrap-up: Effectively communicating science-related topics and their political and ethical implications to a non-expert audience.
SkriptPapers are made available for the participants of this course.
LiteraturPapers are made available for the participants of this course.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesThe total number of students is 10. MSc students, PhD students and postdocs with a science and technology background have priority; weekly meetings of 3 hours during FS 2016, 6 ETCS (39 contact hours + 141 hours for preparations and exercises); grading based on the exercises on a 1-6 point scale, the parts contribute in the following way: argumentation 50%, science communication 50%.