Stefan Bechtold: Catalogue data in Spring Semester 2016

Name Prof. Dr. Stefan Bechtold
FieldIntellectual Property
Address
Professur f. Intellectual Property
ETH Zürich, IFW E 47.2
Haldeneggsteig 4
8092 Zürich
SWITZERLAND
Telephone+41 44 632 26 70
E-mailsbechtold@ethz.ch
URLhttp://www.ip.ethz.ch
DepartmentHumanities, Social and Political Sciences
RelationshipFull Professor

NumberTitleECTSHoursLecturers
851-0708-00LIntroduction to Law Restricted registration - show details
Introduction to Law as GESS Compulsory Elective Course:
Students who have attended or will attend the lecture "Introduction to Law for Architecture" (851-0703-01L), "Introduction to Law for Civil Engineering" (851-0703-03L) or " Introduction to Law" (851-0703-00) , cannot register for this course unit.

Particularly suitable for students of D-HEST, D-MAVT, D-MATL, D-USYS
2 credits2VS. Bechtold
AbstractThis class introduces students to basic features of the legal system. Questions of constitutional and administrative law, contract law, tort law, corporate law, as well as litigation are covered.
ObjectiveIntroduction to fundamental questions of public and private law which serves as a foundation for more advanced law classes.
Content1. Öffentliches Recht
Staatsrecht: Funktion und Quellen des Rechts, Aufbau und Organisation des Staates, Grundrechte, Grundzüge des Völker- und Europarechts. Verwaltungsrecht: Verwaltungsverhältnis, Verfügung, Verwaltungsorganisation, Durchsetzung des Verwaltungsrechts, Verwaltungsverfahrensrecht, Grundzüge des Polizei-, Umwelt- und Raumplanungsrechts.

2. Privatrecht
Vertragsrecht: Vertragsfreiheit, Vertragsentstehung, -erfüllung und -verletzung, Grundzüge des Kauf- und Mietvertrags. Haftungsrecht: Verschuldenshaftung und Kausalhaftung, Beschränkung der Haftung. Grundzüge des Gesellschafts- und Zivilprozessrechts.
Lecture notesAuf der Moodle-Plattform verfügbar.
LiteratureWeiterführende Informationen sind auf der Moodle-Lernumgebung zur Vorlesung erhältlich (s. http://www.ip.ethz.ch/education/grundzuege).
851-0732-01LWorkshop and Lecture Series in Law and Economics Information 2 credits2SS. Bechtold, G. Hertig
AbstractThe Workshop and Lectures Series in Law and Economics is a joint seminar of ETH Zurich and the Universities of Basel, Lucerne, St. Gallen and Zurich. Legal, economics, and psychology scholars will give a lecture and/or present their current research. All speakers are internationally well-known experts from Europe, the U.S. and beyond.
ObjectiveAfter the workshop and lecture series, participants should be acquainted with interdisciplinary approaches in law and economics. They should also have an overview of current topics of international research in this area.
ContentThe workshop and lecture series will present a mix of speakers who represent the wide range of current social science research methods applied to law. In particular, theoretical models, empirical and experimental research as well as legal research methods will be represented. This series is held each spring semester. In the fall semester, the series is complemented by two specialized law-and-economics series, one on law & finance and one on innovation.
Lecture notesTo be discussed papers are posted in advance on the course web page (http://www.lawecon.ethz.ch/workshop-and-lecture-series/lawecon.html).
LiteratureCooter, Robert and Tom Ulen (2011), Law and Economics, 6th ed. Addision and Wesley;
Lawless, Robert, Robbennolt, Jennifer & Ulen, Thomas (2010), Empirical Methods in Law, Wolters Kluwer;
Posner, Richard (2011), Economic Analysis of Law, 8th ed. Aspen Publishers;
Dau-Schmidt K. (2002). Law and Economics: Empirical Dimensions. In: Neil J. Smelser and Paul B. Baltes (eds). International Encyclopedia of the Social & Behavioral Sciences, Elsevier;
Jolls, Christine, Caas R. Sunstein & Richard Thaler (1998). A Behavioral Approach to Law and Economics. Stanford Law Review 50(5): 1471-1550;
Newman, Peter (ed.) (1998). The New Palgrave Dictionary of Economics and the Law, Macmillan;
Polinsky A. Mitchell and Steven M. Shavell (2002). Law: Economics of its Public Enforcement. In: Neil J. Smelser and Paul B. Baltes (eds). International Encyclopedia of the Social & Behavioral Sciences, Elsevier;
Polinsky, A. Mitchell (1989). An Introduction to Law and Economics, 2nd ed., Aspen Law and Business;
Schäfer, Hans-Bernd and Claus Ott (2005), Lehrbuch der ökonomischen Analyse des Zivilrechts, 4th ed. Springer;
Shavell, Steven M (2004), Foundations of Economic Analysis of Law, Harvard University Press.
851-0732-03LIntellectual Property: An Introduction Information Restricted registration - show details
Particularly suitable for students of D-ARCH, D-BIOL, D-CHAB, D-INFK, D-ITET, D-MAVT, D- MATL, D-MTEC
2 credits2VS. Bechtold
AbstractThe course introduces students to the basics of the intellectual property system and of innovation policy. Areas covered include patent, copyright, trademark, design, know-how protection, open source, and technology transfer. The course looks at Swiss, European, U.S. and international law and uses examples from a broad range of technologies. Insights can be used in academia, industry or start-ups.
ObjectiveIntellectual property issues become more and more important in our society. In order to prepare students for their future challenges in research, industry or start-ups, this course introduces them to the foundations of the intellectual property system. The course covers patent, copyright, trademark, design, know-how protection, open source, and technology transfer law. It explains links to contract, antitrust, Internet, privacy and communications law where appropriate. While the introduction to these areas of the law is designed at a general level, examples and case studies come from various jurisdictions, including Switzerland, the European Union, the United States, and international law.

In addition, the course introduces students to the fundamentals of innovation policy. After exposing students to the economics of intellectual property protection, the course asks questions such as: Why do states grant property rights in inventions? Has the protection of intellectual property gone too far? How do advances in biotechnology and the Internet affect the intellectual property system? What is the relationship between open source, open access and intellectual property? What alternatives to intellectual property protection exist?

Knowing how the intellectual property system works and what kind of protection is available is useful for all students who are interested in working in academia, industry or in starting their own company. Exposing students to the advantages and disadvantages of the intellectual property system enables them to participate in the current policy discussions on intellectual property, innovation and technology law. The course will include practical examples and case studies as well as guest speakers from industry and private practice.
851-0740-00LInternet Architecture & Policy Information Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 20
3 credits2SS. Bechtold, T. Roscoe
AbstractThis course examines and critiques the design of the Internet, with a focus on the connection between the engineering features and principles of the network and the legal, economic, and political concerns which have followed its evolution.
ObjectiveThis course examines and critiques the design of the Internet (broadly defined), with a focus on the connection between the engineering features and principles of the network (packet switching, global addressing, the end-to-end argument, etc.) and the legal, economic, and political concerns which have followed its evolution (security properties, censorship and censorship resistance, "net neutrality", etc.). No prior knowledge of networking technologies is required; conversely the course will focus only on those features of the Internet design which have strong political and legal implications (and vice versa). The course consists of two parts: lectures and seminars in one part provide an introduction and discussion of the technical, legal, and political aspects of the Internet design. The other part consists of a specific case study of some aspect of the Internet by individual students.
860-0018-00LInternet Architecture & Policy (with Case Study) Information Restricted registration - show details 6 credits4SS. Bechtold, T. Roscoe
AbstractThis course examines and critiques the design of the Internet, with a focus on the connection between the engineering features and principles of the network and the legal, economic, and political concerns which have followed its evolution.
ObjectiveThis course examines and critiques the design of the Internet (broadly defined), with a focus on the connection between the engineering features and principles of the network (packet switching, global addressing, the end-to-end argument, etc.) and the legal, economic, and political concerns which have followed its evolution (security properties, censorship and censorship resistance, "net neutrality", etc.). No prior knowledge of networking technologies is required; conversely the course will focus only on those features of the Internet design which have strong political and legal implications (and vice versa). The course consists of two parts: lectures and seminars in one part provide an introduction and discussion of the technical, legal, and political aspects of the Internet design. The other part consists of a specific case study of some aspect of the Internet by individual students.