From 2 November 2020, the autumn semester 2020 will take place online. Exceptions: Courses that can only be carried out with on-site presence.
Please note the information provided by the lecturers via e-mail.

Harald Fischer-Tiné: Catalogue data in Spring Semester 2019

Name Prof. Dr. Harald Fischer-Tiné
FieldThe History of the Modern World
Address
Institut für Geschichte
ETH Zürich, RZ G 24
Clausiusstrasse 59
8092 Zürich
SWITZERLAND
Telephone+41 44 632 69 15
E-mailharald.fischertine@gess.ethz.ch
DepartmentHumanities, Social and Political Sciences
RelationshipFull Professor

NumberTitleECTSHoursLecturers
851-0101-61LSociety, Politics and Entertainment Technology: Popular Indian Cinema as a Lens on Historical Change Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 25.
1 credit1UH. Fischer-Tiné
AbstractThe seminar introduces students to the major themes and debates in Indian film history and explores the use of popular cinema as a lens through which technical, cultural, social and political change in the Indian sub-continent can be understood.
ObjectiveThe participants of this course will engage in-depth with recent research on Indian popular Cinema. The selection of the readings will focus on a variety of issues, such as the technological innovation on the art form and its social impact, the representation of history in Indian Cinema, Bollywood's stance on burning issues such as the caste and gender question etc. Besides, the reconstruction of the specific South Asian variety of a global art form and entertainment technology will imply discussions of the problems triggered by cultural globalisation and consumerism. Skill-wise, the students will have ample opportunity to train their analytical acumen as well as their writing and presentation skills. (Participation in the lecture "Bollywood and Beyond" is not mandatory but strongly recommended)
Prerequisites / NoticeParticipation in the lecture "Bollywood and Beyond" is not mandatory but strongly recommended.
851-0101-62LBollywood and Beyond: A History of Indian Cinema In The 20th Century3 credits2VH. Fischer-Tiné
AbstractThe Indian film industry has been around for over 100 years and is one of the richest and most variegated of the world. The lecture reconstructs the historical development of Indian cinema from late 19th to early 21st centuries and uses it as a lens through which technical, cultural, social and political change in the Indian sub-continent can be explored.
ObjectiveThe objectives of this course are three-fold. For one, the participants shall learn to question aesthetic cetainties and received modes of perception of cinematographic art. Secondly they will be acquainted with the huge potential of films as a historical source to grasp processes of social and cultural change. Besides, the reconstruction of the international career of a specific variety of an art form and entertainment techology will also raise important questions of cultural globalisation and consumerism. As a side-effect, as it were, the students will will also be provided with important insights into the chequered history of the Indian subcontinent in during the course of the 20th century.
853-0726-00LHistory II: Global (Anti-Imperialism and Decolonisation, 1919-1975)3 credits2VH. Fischer-Tiné
AbstractThe lecture will give an insight into the formation of anticolonial nationalist movements in Asia and Africa from the beginning of the 20th century onwards and discuss the various dimensions of dismantling of colonial empires.
ObjectiveThe lecture will give students an insight into the history of the non-European world, looking specifically into the political, economic, social and cultural transformation on the backgrounds of colonial penetration strategies and the resistance of anti-colonial movements. The aim is to show that societies in Asia and Africa are not just the product of colonial penetration or anti-colonial resistance, but that both aspects influenced the present political, economic, social and cultural perception of these parts of the world to a considerable extent. A nuanced knowledge of the long and arduous process of decolonisation is hence important to understand today's geopolitical constellation, still characterised by the struggle for a just post-imperial world order.
LiteratureJansen, J.C. und Osterhammel, J., Dekolonisation: Das Ende der Imperien, München 2013.
Prerequisites / NoticeA detailed syllabus will be available in due course at http://www.gmw.ethz.ch/en/teaching/lehrveranstaltungen.html
862-0078-07LResearch Colloquium. Extra-European History and Global History (FS 2019)
For PhD students and postdoctoral researchers. Masterstudents are welcome.
2 credits1KH. Fischer-Tiné, M. Dusinberre
AbstractThe fortnightly colloquium provides a forum for PhD students and postdoctoral researchers to present and discuss their current work. Half of the slots are reserved for presentations by invited external scholars.
ObjectivePhD students will have an opportunity to improve their presentation skills and obtain an important chance to receive feedback both from peers and more advanced scholars.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe venue changes each semester alternately between UZH and ETH.