Laura Nyström: Catalogue data in Autumn Semester 2019

Name Prof. Dr. Laura Nyström
FieldFood Biochemistry
Address
Inst.f. Lebensm.wiss.,Ern.,Ges.
ETH Zürich, LFO F 19
Schmelzbergstrasse 9
8092 Zürich
SWITZERLAND
Telephone+41 44 632 91 65
E-maillaura.nystroem@hest.ethz.ch
DepartmentHealth Sciences and Technology
RelationshipFull Professor

NumberTitleECTSHoursLecturers
752-0300-00LScientific Practices in Food Science Restricted registration - show details 3 credits2VL. Nyström, S. Di Palma, P. A. Fischer, H. Gahlon
AbstractDocumentation and communication of scientific projects is one of the focal points of any scientific work. They take place at different times of a project and therefore have many aspects and different methodologies. The lecture takes up these steps and teaches the necessary methodical tools.
ObjectiveUnderstanding of the scientific approach to literature research, documentation, reporting, and communication of scientific projects and their results.
Content- Literature (scientific publishing, sources and their quality), literature research, databases
- Writing scientific reports in German and English
- Practical statistics with examples and exercises
- Create graphics and tables
- Creation of a poster
- Assessment, processing, reduction, and storage of data
- Ethics in research (plagiarism, acknowledgements)
- Other relevant topics
Prerequisites / Noticekeine
752-1000-AALFood Chemistry I
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
3 credits6RL. Nyström
AbstractTo familiarise with the structure, properties and reactivity of food constituents. To understand the relationship between the multiple chemical reactions and the quality of food.
ObjectiveTo familiarise with the structure, properties and reactivity of food constituents. To understand the relationship between the multiple chemical reactions and the quality of food.
ContentDescriptive chemistry of food constituents (proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, plant phenolics, flavour compounds).
Reactions which affect the colour, flavour, texture, and the nutritional value of food raw materials and food products during processing, storage and preparation in a positive or in a negative way (e.g. lipid oxidation, Maillard reaction, enzymatic browning).
Links to food analysis, food processing, and nutrition.
Lecture notesThe lectures are supplemented with handouts.
LiteratureIntroductory Food Chemistry, John W. Brady, Cornell University Press, New York, 2013. Selected sections.
752-1000-00LFood Chemistry I3 credits2VL. Nyström, S. Boulos, M. Erzinger
AbstractTo familiarise with the structure, properties and reactivity of food constituents. To understand the relationship between the multiple chemical reactions and the quality of food.
ObjectiveTo familiarise with the structure, properties and reactivity of food constituents. To understand the relationship between the multiple chemical reactions and the quality of food.
ContentDescriptive chemistry of food constituents (proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, plant phenolics, flavour compounds).
Reactions which affect the colour, flavour, texture, and the nutritional value of food raw materials and food products during processing, storage and preparation in a positive or in a negative way (e.g. lipid oxidation, Maillard reaction, enzymatic browning).
Links to food analysis, food processing, and nutrition.
The lectures Food Chemistry I and Food Chemistry II constitute a unit.
Lecture notesThe lectures are supplemented with handouts.
LiteratureH.-D. Belitz, W. Grosch, P. Schieberle, „Lehrbuch der Lebensmittelchemie“, Springer-Verlag, Berlin, Heidelberg, 2008
752-1003-00LFood Chemistry II3 credits2VL. Nyström, S. Boulos, M. Erzinger
AbstractTo familiarize with the structure, properties and reactivity of food constituents. To understand the relationship between the multiple chemical reactions and the quality of food.
ObjectiveTo familiarize with the structure, properties and reactivity of food constituents. To understand the relationship between the multiple chemical reactions and the quality of food.
ContentDescriptive chemistry of food constituents (proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, plant phenolics, flavour compounds).
Reactions which affect the colour, flavour, texture, and the nutritional value of food raw materials and food products during processing, storage and preparation in a positive or in a negative way (e.g. lipid oxidation, Maillard reaction, enzymatic browning).
Links to food analysis, food processing, and nutrition.
The lectures Food Chemistry I and Food Chemistry II constitute a unit.
Lecture notesThe lectures are supplemented with handouts.
LiteratureH.-D. Belitz, W. Grosch, P. Schieberle, Lehrbuch der Lebensmittelchemie, Springer-Verlag, Berlin, Heidelberg, 2008
752-1021-00LFood Enzymology3 credits2GL. Nyström, M. Erzinger
AbstractThe course covers the fundamentals of food enzymology, application of endogenous and exogenous enzymes in food processing, as well as use of enzymes in analytics.
ObjectiveStudents can describe what enzymes are and can explain their use and functions in food and food products.
Students can argue why and how enzymes are used in food processing and analysis.
Students execute a research project independently and defend their findings during a presentation to peer students and an expert panel.
ContentEnzymes in foods: the use of added enzymes in food processing, control and/or utilization of endogenous enzymes, production of enzyme preparations for food use, and chemical analysis of food components by enzymatic methods.

Course contains lectures and a practical group work.
Lecture notesThe lectures are supplemented with handouts.
Prerequisites / NoticeCourse prerequisites: Food Chemistry I/II and Food Analysis I/II (or equivalent)
752-1101-AALFood Analysis I
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
3 credits6RL. Nyström
AbstractTo understand the basic principles of analytical chemistry. To get acquainted with the principles and applications of important routine methods of instrumental food analysis (UV/VIS, IR, AAS, GC, HPLC).
ObjectiveTo understand the basic principles of analytical chemistry. To get acquainted with the principles and applications of important routine methods of instrumental food analysis (UV/VIS, IR, AAS, GC, HPLC).
ContentFundamentals: Chemical concentrations. The analytical process (sampling, sample preparation, calibration, measurement, statistical evaluation of analytical results). Errors in quantitative analysis. Important parameters of an analytical procedure (accuracy, precision, limit of detection, sensitivity, specificity/selectivity).

Methods: Optical spectroscopy (basic principles, UV/VIS, IR, and atomic absorption spectroscopy). Chromatography (GC, HPLC).
Lecture notesThe lectures are supplemented with handouts.
LiteratureFood Analysis - Fourth Edition, edited by S. Suzanne Nielson; 2010; Springer, Selected sections.