Thomas Schmidt: Catalogue data in Spring Semester 2018

Name Prof. Dr. Thomas Schmidt
FieldElectrochemistry
Address
Lab. für Physikalische Chemie
ETH Zürich, HCI G 215
Vladimir-Prelog-Weg 1-5/10
8093 Zürich
SWITZERLAND
Telephone+41 44 632 22 64
E-mailthomas.schmidt@phys.chem.ethz.ch
DepartmentChemistry and Applied Biosciences
RelationshipFull Professor

NumberTitleECTSHoursLecturers
529-0191-01LRenewable Energy Technologies II, Energy Storage and Conversion
The lectures Renewable Energy Technologies I (529-0193-00L) and Renewable Energy Technologies II (529-0191-01L) can be taken independently from one another.
4 credits3GT. Schmidt, L. Gubler
AbstractGlobal & Swiss energy system. Storage: Pumped water, flywheels, compressed air. Hydrogen as energy carrier; electrolysis; power-to-gas. Fuel cells: from fundamentals to systems; Fuel cell vehicles; electrochemical storage in batteries. supercapacitors and redox flow cells; electromobility. The main focus of the lecture will be on electrochemical energy conversion and storage.
ObjectiveStudents will recognize the importance of energy storage in an industrial energy system, specifically in the context of a future system based on renewable sources. The efficient generation of electricity from hydrogen in fuel cells, and the efficient energy storage in batteries and supercapacitors will be introduced. Students will get a detailed insight into electrochemical energy conversion and storage, which will play an important role in future energy systems.
Literature- Tester, J.W., Drake, E.M., Golay, M.W., Driscoll, M.J., Peters, W.A.: Sustainable Energy - Choosing Among Options (MIT Press, 2005).
- C.H. Hamann, A. Hamnett, W. Vielstich; Electrochemistry, Wiley-VCH (2007).
- K. Krischer, K. Schönleber: Physiccs of Energy Conversion, De Gruyter (2015)
- R. Schlögl, Chemical Energy Storage, De Gruyter (2013)
Prerequisites / NoticePlease note that this is a 3 hours/week lecture including exercises, i.e., exercises will be included and are not separated. It is therefore highly recommended to attend the full 3 hours every week.

Participating students are required to have basic knowlegde of chemistry and thermodynamics.
529-0440-00LPhysical Electrochemistry and Electrocatalysis6 credits3GT. Schmidt
AbstractFundamentals of electrochemistry, electrochemical electron transfer, electrochemical processes, electrochemical kinetics, electrocatalysis, surface electrochemistry, electrochemical energy conversion processes and introduction into the technologies (e.g., fuel cell, electrolysis), electrochemical methods (e.g., voltammetry, impedance spectroscopy), mass transport.
ObjectiveProviding an overview and in-depth understanding of Fundamentals of electrochemistry, electrochemical electron transfer, electrochemical processes, electrochemical kinetics, electrocatalysis, surface electrochemistry, electrochemical energy conversion processes (fuel cell, electrolysis), electrochemical methods and mass transport during electrochemical reactions. The students will learn about the importance of electrochemical kinetics and its relation to industrial electrochemical processes and in the energy seactor.
ContentReview of electrochemical thermodynamics, description electrochemical kinetics, Butler-Volmer equation, Tafel kinetics, simple electrochemical reactions, electron transfer, Marcus Theory, fundamentals of electrocatalysis, elementary reaction processes, rate-determining steps in electrochemical reactions, practical examples and applications specifically for electrochemical energy conversion processes, introduction to electrochemical methods, mass transport in electrochemical systems. Introduction to fuel cells and electrolysis
Lecture notesWill be handed out during the Semester
LiteraturePhysical Electrochemistry, E. Gileadi, Wiley VCH
Electrochemical Methods, A. Bard/L. Faulkner, Wiley-VCH
Modern Electrochemistry 2A - Fundamentals of Electrodics, J. Bockris, A. Reddy, M. Gamboa-Aldeco, Kluwer Academic/Plenum Publishers
529-0499-00LPhysical Chemistry1 credit1KB. H. Meier, M. Ernst, P. H. Hünenberger, G. Jeschke, F. Merkt, M. Reiher, J. Richardson, R. Riek, S. Riniker, T. Schmidt, R. Signorell, H. J. Wörner
AbstractSeminar series covering current developments in Physical Chemistry
Objective