Das Herbstsemester 2020 findet in einer gemischten Form aus Online- und Präsenzunterricht statt.
Bitte lesen Sie die publizierten Informationen zu den einzelnen Lehrveranstaltungen genau.

Tobias Schmidt: Katalogdaten im Herbstsemester 2018

NameHerr Prof. Dr. Tobias Schmidt
LehrgebietEnergiepolitik
Adresse
Professur für Energiepolitik
ETH Zürich, IFW D 25
Haldeneggsteig 4
8092 Zürich
SWITZERLAND
Auszeichnung: Die Goldene Eule
Telefon+41 44 632 04 86
E-Mailtobiasschmidt@ethz.ch
URLhttp://www.epg.ethz.ch
DepartementGeistes-, Sozial- und Staatswissenschaften
BeziehungAssistenzprofessor (Tenure Track)

NummerTitelECTSUmfangDozierende
701-0901-00LETH Week 2018: Energy Matters Belegung eingeschränkt - Details anzeigen
All ETH Bachelor`s, Master`s and exchange students can take part in the ETH week. No prior knowledge is required
1 KP3SR. Knutti, C. Bratrich, S. Brusoni, A. Cabello Llamas, V. Hoffmann, G. Hug, M. Mazzotti, A. Schlüter, T. Schmidt, A. Vaterlaus
KurzbeschreibungETH Week is an innovative one-week course designed to foster critical thinking and creative learning. Students from all departments as well as professors and external experts will work together in interdisciplinary teams. They will develop interventions that could play a role in solving some of our most pressing global challenges. In 2018, ETH Week will focus on the topic of energy.
Lernziel- Domain specific knowledge: Students have immersed knowledge about a certain complex, societal topic which will be selected every year. They understand the complex system context of the current topic, by comprehending its scientific, technical, political, social, ecological and economic perspectives.

- Analytical skills: The ETH Week participants are able to structure complex problems systematically using selected methods. They are able to acquire further knowledge and to critically analyse the knowledge in interdisciplinary groups and with experts and the help of team tutors.

- Design skills: The students are able to use their knowledge and skills to develop concrete approaches for problem solving and decision making to a selected problem statement, critically reflect these approaches, assess their feasibility, to transfer them into a concrete form (physical model, prototypes, strategy paper, etc.) and to present this work in a creative way (role-plays, videos, exhibitions, etc.).

- Self-competence: The students are able to plan their work effectively, efficiently and autonomously. By considering approaches from different disciplines they are able to make a judgment and form a personal opinion. In exchange with non-academic partners from business, politics, administration, nongovernmental organisations and media they are able to communicate appropriately, present their results professionally and creatively and convince a critical audience.

- Social competence: The students are able to work in multidisciplinary teams, i.e. they can reflect critically their own discipline, debate with students from other disciplines and experts in a critical-constructive and respectful way and can relate their own positions to different intellectual approaches. They can assess how far they are able to actively make a contribution to society by using their personal and professional talents and skills and as "Change Agents".
InhaltThe week is mainly about problem solving and design thinking applied to the complex world of energy. During ETH Week students will have the opportunity to work in small interdisciplinary groups, allowing them to critically analyse both their own approaches and those of other disciplines, and to integrate these into their work.

While deepening their knowledge about energy production, distribution and storage, students will be introduced to various methods and tools for generating creative ideas and understand how different people are affected by each part of the system. In addition to lectures and literature, students will acquire knowledge via excursions into the real world, empirical observations, and conversations with researchers and experts.

A key attribute of the ETH Week is that students are expected to find their own problem, rather than just solve the problem that has been handed to them.

Therefore, the first three days of the week will concentrate on identifying a problem the individual teams will work on, while the last two days are focused on generating solutions and communicating the team's ideas.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesNo prerequisites. Program is open to Bachelor and Masters from all ETH Departments. All students must apply through a competitive application process at www.ethz.ch/ethweek. Participation is subject to successful selection through this competitive process.
851-0609-06LGoverning the Energy Transition Belegung eingeschränkt - Details anzeigen
Number of participants limited to 25.

Primarily suited for Master and PhD level.
3 KP2VT. Schmidt, S. Sewerin
KurzbeschreibungThis course addresses the role of policy and its underlying politics in the transformation of the energy sector. It covers historical, socio-economic, and political perspectives and applies various theoretical concepts to specific aspects of governing the energy transition.
Lernziel- To gain an overview of the history of the transition of large technical systems
- To recognize current challenges in the energy system to understand the theoretical frameworks and concepts for studying transitions
- To demonstrate knowledge on the role of policy and politics in energy transitions
InhaltClimate change, access to energy and other societal challenges are directly linked to the way we use and create energy. Both the recent United Nations Paris climate change agreement and the UN Sustainable Development Goals make a fast and extensive transition of the energy system necessary.
This course introduces the social and environmental challenges involved in the energy sector and discusses the implications of these challenges for the rate and direction of technical change in the energy sector. It compares the current situation with historical socio-technical transitions and derives the consequences for policy-making. It then introduces theoretical frameworks and concepts for studying innovation and transitions. It then focuses on the role of policy and policy change in governing the energy transition, considering the role of political actors, institutions and policy feedback.
The course has a highly interactive (seminar-like) character. Students are expected to actively engage in the weekly discussions and to give a presentation (15-20 minutes) on one of the weekly topics during that particular session. The presentation and participation in the discussions will form one part of the final grade (50%), the remaining 50% of the final grade will be formed by a final exam.
SkriptSlides and reading material will be made available via moodle.ethz.ch (only for registered students).
LiteraturA reading list will be provided via moodle.ethz.ch at the beginning of the semester.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesThis course is particularly suited for students of the following programmes: MA Comparative International Studies; MSc Energy Science & Technology; MSc Environmental Sciences; MSc Management, Technology & Economics; MSc Science, Technology & Policy; ETH & UZH PhD programmes.
857-0103-00LTopics in Public Policy: Governing the Energy Transition Belegung eingeschränkt - Details anzeigen
Only for MA Comparative and International Studies.
8 KP2V + 2ST. Schmidt, S. Sewerin
KurzbeschreibungThis course addresses the role of policy and its underlying politics in the transformation of the energy sector. It covers historical, socio-economic, and political perspectives and applies various theoretical concepts to specific aspects of governing the energy transition. On this basis, students develop their own research project and produce a research paper.
Lernziel- To gain an overview of the history of the transition of large technical systems
- To recognize current challenges in the energy system to understand the theoretical frameworks and concepts for studying transitions
- To demonstrate knowledge on the role of policy and politics in energy transitions
- To develop own research question and address it in research paper
InhaltClimate change, access to energy and other societal challenges are directly linked to the way we use and create energy. Both the recent United Nations Paris climate change agreement and the UN Sustainable Development Goals make a fast and extensive transition of the energy system necessary.
This course introduces the social and environmental challenges involved in the energy sector and discusses the implications of these challenges for the rate and direction of technical change in the energy sector. It compares the current situation with historical socio-technical transitions and derives the consequences for policy-making. It then introduces theoretical frameworks and concepts for studying innovation and transitions. It then focuses on the role of public policy and policy change in governing the energy transitions, considering the role of political actors, institutions and policy feedback.
The course has a highly interactive (seminar-like) character. Students are expected to actively engage in the weekly discussions and to give a presentation (15-20 minutes) on one of the weekly topics during that particular session. In addition to weekly lectures and student presentations, students will write a research paper of approximately 6000 words.
The presentation and participation in the discussions will form one part of the final grade (20%), the final exam another (20%), with the research paper forming the rest (60%).
SkriptSlides and reading material will be made available via moodle.ethz.ch (only for registered students).
LiteraturA reading list will be provided via moodle.ethz.ch at the beginning of the semester.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesThis course is intended for the MA Comparative International Studies programme.
860-0002-00LQuantitative Policy Analysis and Modeling6 KP4GA. Patt, S. Hanger-Kopp, S. Pfenninger, T. Schmidt
KurzbeschreibungThe lectures will introduce students to the principles of quantitative policy analysis, namely the methods to predict and evaluate the social, economic, and environmental effects of alternative strategies to achieve public objectives. A series of graded assignments will give students an opportunity for students to apply those methods to a set of case studies
LernzielThe objectives of this course are to develop the following key skills necessary for policy analysts:
- Identifying the critical quantitative factors that are of importance to policy makers in a range of decision-making situations.
- Developing conceptual models of the types of processes and relationships governing these quantitative factors, including stock-flow dynamics, feedback loops, optimization, sources and effects of uncertainty, and agent coordination problems.
- Develop and program numerical models to simulate the processes and relationships, in order to identify policy problems and the effects of policy interventions.
- Communicate the findings from these simulations and associated analysis in a manner that makes transparent their theoretical foundation, the level and sources of uncertainty, and ultimately their applicability to the policy problem.
The course will proceed through a series of policy analysis and modeling exercises, involving real-world or hypothetical problems. The specific examples around which work will be done will concern the environment, energy, health, and natural hazards management.