Autumn Semester 2020 takes place in a mixed form of online and classroom teaching.
Please read the published information on the individual courses carefully.

Gabriela Hug: Catalogue data in Autumn Semester 2016

Name Prof. Dr. Gabriela Hug
FieldElectric Power Systems
Address
Inst. f. El. Energieübertragung
ETH Zürich, ETL G 26
Physikstrasse 3
8092 Zürich
SWITZERLAND
Telephone+41 44 633 81 91
E-mailhug@eeh.ee.ethz.ch
URLhttp://www.psl.ee.ethz.ch/people/prof--gabriela-hug.html
DepartmentInformation Technology and Electrical Engineering
RelationshipFull Professor

NumberTitleECTSHoursLecturers
227-0122-00LIntroduction to Electric Power Transmission: System & Technology Information 6 credits4GC. Franck, G. Hug
AbstractIntroduction to theory and technology of electric power transmission systems.
ObjectiveAt the end of this course, the student will be able to: describe the structure of electric power systems, name the most important components and describe what they are needed for, apply models for transformers and lines, explain the technology of overhead power lines, calculate stationary power flows, current and voltage transients and other basic parameters in simple power systems.
ContentStructure of electric power systems, transformer and power line models, analysis of and power flow calculation in basic systems, symmetrical and unsymmetrical three-phase systems, transient current and voltage processes, technology and principle of electric power systems.
Lecture notesLecture script in English, exercises and sample solutions, translation of important vocabulary: english-german.
227-0526-00LPower System Analysis Information 6 credits4GG. Hug
AbstractThe goal of this course is understanding the stationary and dynamic problems in electrical power systems. The course includes the development of stationary models of the electrical network, their mathematical representation and special characteristics and solution methods of large linear and non-linear systems of equations related to electrical power networks.
ObjectiveThe goal of this course is understanding the stationary and dynamic problems in electrical power systems. The course includes the development of stationary models of the electrical network, their mathematical representation and special characteristics and solution methods of large linear and non-linear systems of equations related to electrical power networks.
ContentThe electrical power transmission system, the energy management system, requirements of the electrical power transmission (demand oriented, operationally, economically), network planning and network operation, models of N-port network components (line, cables, shunts, transformers), the p.u. computation, computer oriented network models, linear networks (solution methods - direct, iterative), algorithms for the solution of non-linear sets of equations, derived from the electrical power system (Newton-Raphson), power flow computation (problem definition, solution methods), three phase short-circuit computation, application of power flow algorithms. Introduction to power system stability.
Lecture notesLecture notes. Course is supported by WWW-teaching system.
227-1631-00LEnergy System Analysis Information 4 credits3GG. Hug, S. Hellweg, F. Noembrini, A. Schlüter
AbstractThe course provides an introduction to the methods and tools for analysis of energy consumption, energy production and energy flows. Environmental aspects are included as well as economical considerations. Different sectors of the society are discussed, such as electric power, buildings, and transportation. Models for energy system analysis planning are introduced.
ObjectiveThe purpose of the course is to give the participants an overview of the methods and tools used for energy systems analysis and how to use these in simple practical examples.
ContentThe course gives an introduction to methods and tools for analysis of energy consumption, energy production and energy flows. Both larger systems, e.g. countries, and smaller systems, e.g. industries, homes, vehicles, are studied. The tools and methods are applied to various problems during the exercises. Different conventions of energy statistics used are introduced.

The course provides also an introduction to energy systems models for developing scenarios of future energy consumption and production. Bottom-up and Top-Down approaches are addressed and their features and applications discussed.

The course contains the following parts:
Part I: Energy flows and energy statistics
Part II: Environmental impacts
Part III: Electric power systems
Part IV: Energy in buildings
Part V: Energy in transportation
Part VI: Energy systems models
Lecture notesHandouts
LiteratureK. Blok: Introduction to Energy Analysis, Techne Press, Amsterdam 2006, ISBN 90-8594-016-8