Autumn Semester 2020 takes place in a mixed form of online and classroom teaching.
Please read the published information on the individual courses carefully.

Gabriela Hug: Catalogue data in Autumn Semester 2018

Name Prof. Dr. Gabriela Hug
FieldElectric Power Systems
Address
Inst. f. El. Energieübertragung
ETH Zürich, ETL G 26
Physikstrasse 3
8092 Zürich
SWITZERLAND
Telephone+41 44 633 81 91
E-mailhug@eeh.ee.ethz.ch
URLhttp://www.psl.ee.ethz.ch/people/prof--gabriela-hug.html
DepartmentInformation Technology and Electrical Engineering
RelationshipFull Professor

NumberTitleECTSHoursLecturers
151-0906-00LFrontiers in Energy Research
Does not take place this semester.
This course is only for doctoral students.
2 credits2SD. Poulikakos, R. Boes, V. Hoffmann, G. Hug, M. Mazzotti, A. Patt, A. Schlüter
AbstractDoctoral students at ETH Zurich working in the broad area of energy present their research to their colleagues, their advisors and the scientific community. Each week a different student gives a 50-60 min presentation of their research (a full introduction, background & findings) followed by discussion with the audience.
ObjectiveKnowledge of advanced research in the area of energy.
ContentPhD students at ETH Zurich working in the broad area of energy present their research to their colleagues, to their advisors and to the scientific community. Every week there are two presentations, each structured as follows: 15 min introduction to the research topic, 15 min presentation of the results, 15 min discussion with the audience.
Lecture notesSlides will be distributed.
227-0122-00LIntroduction to Electric Power Transmission: System & Technology6 credits4GC. Franck, G. Hug
AbstractIntroduction to theory and technology of electric power transmission systems.
ObjectiveAt the end of this course, the student will be able to: describe the structure of electric power systems, name the most important components and describe what they are needed for, apply models for transformers and lines, explain the technology of overhead power lines, calculate stationary power flows, current and voltage transients and other basic parameters in simple power systems.
ContentStructure of electric power systems, transformer and power line models, analysis of and power flow calculation in basic systems, symmetrical and unsymmetrical three-phase systems, transient current and voltage processes, technology and principle of electric power systems.
Lecture notesLecture script in English, exercises and sample solutions, translation of important vocabulary: english-german.
227-0526-00LPower System Analysis6 credits4GG. Hug
AbstractThe goal of this course is understanding the stationary and dynamic problems in electrical power systems. The course includes the development of stationary models of the electrical network, their mathematical representation and special characteristics and solution methods of large linear and non-linear systems of equations related to electrical power networks.
ObjectiveThe goal of this course is understanding the stationary and dynamic problems in electrical power systems and the application of analysis tools in steady and dynamic states.
ContentThe course includes the development of stationary models of the electrical network, their mathematical representation and special characteristics and solution methods of large linear and non-linear systems of equations related to electrical power grids. Approaches such as the Newton-Raphson algorithm applied to power flow equations, superposition technique for short-circuit analysis, equal area criterion and nose curve analysis are discussed as well as power flow computation techniques for distribution grids.
Lecture notesLecture notes.
701-0901-00LETH Week 2018: Energy Matters Restricted registration - show details
All ETH Bachelor`s, Master`s and exchange students can take part in the ETH week. No prior knowledge is required
1 credit3SR. Knutti, C. Bratrich, S. Brusoni, A. Cabello Llamas, V. Hoffmann, G. Hug, M. Mazzotti, A. Schlüter, T. Schmidt, A. Vaterlaus
AbstractETH Week is an innovative one-week course designed to foster critical thinking and creative learning. Students from all departments as well as professors and external experts will work together in interdisciplinary teams. They will develop interventions that could play a role in solving some of our most pressing global challenges. In 2018, ETH Week will focus on the topic of energy.
Objective- Domain specific knowledge: Students have immersed knowledge about a certain complex, societal topic which will be selected every year. They understand the complex system context of the current topic, by comprehending its scientific, technical, political, social, ecological and economic perspectives.

- Analytical skills: The ETH Week participants are able to structure complex problems systematically using selected methods. They are able to acquire further knowledge and to critically analyse the knowledge in interdisciplinary groups and with experts and the help of team tutors.

- Design skills: The students are able to use their knowledge and skills to develop concrete approaches for problem solving and decision making to a selected problem statement, critically reflect these approaches, assess their feasibility, to transfer them into a concrete form (physical model, prototypes, strategy paper, etc.) and to present this work in a creative way (role-plays, videos, exhibitions, etc.).

- Self-competence: The students are able to plan their work effectively, efficiently and autonomously. By considering approaches from different disciplines they are able to make a judgment and form a personal opinion. In exchange with non-academic partners from business, politics, administration, nongovernmental organisations and media they are able to communicate appropriately, present their results professionally and creatively and convince a critical audience.

- Social competence: The students are able to work in multidisciplinary teams, i.e. they can reflect critically their own discipline, debate with students from other disciplines and experts in a critical-constructive and respectful way and can relate their own positions to different intellectual approaches. They can assess how far they are able to actively make a contribution to society by using their personal and professional talents and skills and as "Change Agents".
ContentThe week is mainly about problem solving and design thinking applied to the complex world of energy. During ETH Week students will have the opportunity to work in small interdisciplinary groups, allowing them to critically analyse both their own approaches and those of other disciplines, and to integrate these into their work.

While deepening their knowledge about energy production, distribution and storage, students will be introduced to various methods and tools for generating creative ideas and understand how different people are affected by each part of the system. In addition to lectures and literature, students will acquire knowledge via excursions into the real world, empirical observations, and conversations with researchers and experts.

A key attribute of the ETH Week is that students are expected to find their own problem, rather than just solve the problem that has been handed to them.

Therefore, the first three days of the week will concentrate on identifying a problem the individual teams will work on, while the last two days are focused on generating solutions and communicating the team's ideas.
Prerequisites / NoticeNo prerequisites. Program is open to Bachelor and Masters from all ETH Departments. All students must apply through a competitive application process at www.ethz.ch/ethweek. Participation is subject to successful selection through this competitive process.