From 2 November 2020, the autumn semester 2020 will take place online. Exceptions: Courses that can only be carried out with on-site presence.
Please note the information provided by the lecturers via e-mail.

Christoph Stadtfeld: Catalogue data in Autumn Semester 2018

Name Prof. Dr. Christoph Stadtfeld
FieldSocial Networks
Address
Professur für Soziale Netzwerke
ETH Zürich, WEP J 16
Weinbergstr.109
8092 Zürich
SWITZERLAND
Telephone+41 44 632 07 93
E-mailchristoph.stadtfeld@ethz.ch
URLhttp://www.social-networks.ethz.ch/
DepartmentHumanities, Social and Political Sciences
RelationshipAssociate Professor

NumberTitleECTSHoursLecturers
851-0252-04LBehavioral Studies Colloquium2 credits2KU. Brandes, V. Amati, H.‑D. Daniel, D. Helbing, C. Hölscher, M. Kapur, R. Schubert, C. Stadtfeld, E. Stern
AbstractThis colloquium offers an opportunity for students to discuss their ongoing research and scientific ideas in the behavioral sciences, both at the micro- and macro-levels of cognitive, behavioral and social science. It also offers an opportunity for students from other disciplines to discuss their research ideas in relation to behavioral science. The colloquium also features invited research talks.
ObjectiveStudents know and can apply autonomously up-to-date investigation methods and techniques in the behavioral sciences. They achieve the ability to develop their own ideas in the field and to communicate their ideas in oral presentations and in written papers. The credits will be obtained by a written report of approximately 10 pages.
ContentThis colloquium offers an opportunity for students to discuss their ongoing research and scientific ideas in the behavioral sciences, both at the micro- and macro-levels of cognitive, behavioral and social science. It also offers an opportunity for students from other disciplines to discuss their ideas in so far as they have some relation to behavioral science. The possible research areas are wide and may include theoretical as well as empirical approaches in Social Psychology and Research on Higher Education, Sociology, Modeling and Simulation in Sociology, Decision Theory and Behavioral Game Theory, Economics, Research on Learning and Instruction, Cognitive Psychology and Cognitive Science. Ideally the students (from Bachelor, Master, Ph.D. and Post-Doc programs) have started to start work on their thesis or on any other term paper.
Course credit can be obtained either based on a talk in the colloquium plus a written essay, or by writing an essay about a topic related to one of the other talks in the course. Students interested in giving a talk should contact the course organizers (Ziegler, Kapur) before the first session of the semester. Priority will be given to advanced / doctoral students for oral presentations. The course credits will be obtained by a written report of approximately 10 pages. The colloquium also serves as a venue for invited talks by researchers from other universities and institutions related to behavioral and social sciences.
851-0252-07LOpen Debates in Social Network Research Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 30
2 credits2SC. Stadtfeld, U. Brandes, A. Vörös
AbstractSocial network research develops through contributions from many scientific disciplines. Among others, scholars of sociology, psychology, political science, computer science, physics, mathematics, and statistics have advanced theories and methods in this field - promoting multiple perspectives on important problems. This course aims to present and structure open debates in social network research.
ObjectiveResearch on social networks has developed as a highly interdisciplinary field. By the end of this seminar, students will be able to identify and compare different discipline- and subject-specific approaches to social network research (coming from, e.g., sociology, psychology, political science, computer science, physics, mathematics, and statistics). They will be familiar with recent publications in the field of social networks and be able to critically participate in a number of open debates in the field. Among others, these debates are centered around the types and measurement of social relations across different contexts, the importance of simple generative processes in shaping network structure, the role of social selection and influence mechanisms in promoting segregation and polarization, and the development of statistical models for the analysis of dynamic networks.
851-0252-13LNetwork Modeling
Particularly suitable for students of D-INFK
3 credits2VC. Stadtfeld, V. Amati
AbstractNetwork Science is a distinct domain of data science that focuses on relational systems. Various models have been proposed to describe structures and dynamics of networks. Statistical and numerical methods have been developed to fit these models to empirical data. Emphasis is placed on the statistical analysis of (social) systems and their connection to social theories and data sources.
ObjectiveStudents will be able to develop hypotheses that relate to the structures and dynamics of (social) networks, and tests those by applying advanced statistical network methods such as stochastic actor-oriented models (SAOMs) and exponential random graph models (ERGMs). Students will be able to explain and compare various network models, and develop an understanding how those can be fit to empirical data. This will enable them to independently address research questions from various social science fields.