Laurent Vanbever: Katalogdaten im Herbstsemester 2020

NameHerr Prof. Dr. Laurent Vanbever
LehrgebietVernetzte Systeme
Adresse
Inst. f. Techn. Informatik u. K.
ETH Zürich, ETZ G 90
Gloriastrasse 35
8092 Zürich
SWITZERLAND
Auszeichnung: Die Goldene Eule
Telefon+41 44 632 70 04
E-Maillvanbever@ethz.ch
URLhttps://nsg.ee.ethz.ch
DepartementInformationstechnologie und Elektrotechnik
BeziehungAusserordentlicher Professor

NummerTitelECTSUmfangDozierende
227-0102-00LDiskrete Ereignissysteme Information 6 KP4GL. Thiele, L. Vanbever, R. Wattenhofer
KurzbeschreibungEinführung in Diskrete Ereignissysteme (DES). Zuerst studieren wir populäre Modelle für DES. Im zweiten Teil analysieren wir DES, aus einer Average-Case und einer Worst-Case Sicht. Stichworte: Automaten und Sprachen, Spezifikationsmodelle, Stochastische DES, Worst-Case Ereignissysteme, Verifikation, Netzwerkalgebra.
LernzielOver the past few decades the rapid evolution of computing, communication, and information technologies has brought about the proliferation of new dynamic systems. A significant part of activity in these systems is governed by operational rules designed by humans. The dynamics of these systems are characterized by asynchronous occurrences of discrete events, some controlled (e.g. hitting a keyboard key, sending a message), some not (e.g. spontaneous failure, packet loss).

The mathematical arsenal centered around differential equations that has been employed in systems engineering to model and study processes governed by the laws of nature is often inadequate or inappropriate for discrete event systems. The challenge is to develop new modeling frameworks, analysis techniques, design tools, testing methods, and optimization processes for this new generation of systems.

In this lecture we give an introduction to discrete event systems. We start out the course by studying popular models of discrete event systems, such as automata and Petri nets. In the second part of the course we analyze discrete event systems. We first examine discrete event systems from an average-case perspective: we model discrete events as stochastic processes, and then apply Markov chains and queuing theory for an understanding of the typical behavior of a system. In the last part of the course we analyze discrete event systems from a worst-case perspective using the theory of online algorithms and adversarial queuing.
Inhalt1. Introduction
2. Automata and Languages
3. Smarter Automata
4. Specification Models
5. Stochastic Discrete Event Systems
6. Worst-Case Event Systems
7. Network Calculus
SkriptAvailable
Literatur[bertsekas] Data Networks
Dimitri Bersekas, Robert Gallager
Prentice Hall, 1991, ISBN: 0132009161

[borodin] Online Computation and Competitive Analysis
Allan Borodin, Ran El-Yaniv.
Cambridge University Press, 1998

[boudec] Network Calculus
J.-Y. Le Boudec, P. Thiran
Springer, 2001

[cassandras] Introduction to Discrete Event Systems
Christos Cassandras, Stéphane Lafortune.
Kluwer Academic Publishers, 1999, ISBN 0-7923-8609-4

[fiat] Online Algorithms: The State of the Art
A. Fiat and G. Woeginger

[hochbaum] Approximation Algorithms for NP-hard Problems (Chapter 13 by S. Irani, A. Karlin)
D. Hochbaum

[schickinger] Diskrete Strukturen (Band 2: Wahrscheinlichkeitstheorie und Statistik)
T. Schickinger, A. Steger
Springer, Berlin, 2001

[sipser] Introduction to the Theory of Computation
Michael Sipser.
PWS Publishing Company, 1996, ISBN 053494728X
227-0559-10LSeminar in Communication Networks: Learning, Reasoning and Control Belegung eingeschränkt - Details anzeigen
Findet dieses Semester nicht statt.
Number of participants limited to 24.
2 KP2SL. Vanbever
KurzbeschreibungIn this seminar participating students review, present, and discuss (mostly recent) research papers in the area of computer networks. During the fall semester of 2019, the seminar will focus on topics blending networks with machine learning and control theory.
LernzielThe two main goals of this seminar are: 1) learning how to read and review scientific papers; and 2) learning how to present and discuss technical topics with an audience of peers.

Students are required to attend the entire seminar, choose a paper to present from a given list, prepare and give a presentation on that topic, and lead the follow-up discussion. To ensure the talks' quality, each student will be mentored by a teaching assistant. In addition to presenting one paper, every student is also required to submit one (short) review for one of the two papers presented every week in-class (12 reviews in total).

The students will be evaluated based on their submitted reviews, their presentation, their leadership in animating the discussion for their own paper, and their participation in the discussions of other papers.
InhaltThe seminar will start with two introductory lectures in week 1 and week 2. Starting from week 3, participating students will start reviewing, presenting, and discussing research papers. Each week will see two presentations, for a total of 24 papers.

The course content will vary from semester to semester. During the fall semester of 2019, the seminar will focus on topics blending networks with machine learning and control theory. For details, please see: https://seminar-net.ethz.ch
SkriptThe slides of each presentation will be made available on the website.
LiteraturThe paper selection will be made available on the course website: https://seminar-net.ethz.ch
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesCommunication Networks (227-0120-00L) or equivalents. For fall 2019, it is expected that students have prior knowledge in machine learning and control theory, for instance by having attended appropriate courses.
227-0575-00LAdvanced Topics in Communication Networks (Autumn 2020) Information 6 KP2V + 2UL. Vanbever
KurzbeschreibungThis course covers advanced topics and technologies in computer networks, both theoretically and practically. It is offered each Fall semester, with rotating topics. Repetition for credit is possible with consent of the instructor. In the Fall 2020, the course will cover advanced topics in Internet routing and forwarding.
LernzielThe goals of this course is to provide students with a deeper understanding of the existing and upcoming Internet routing and forwarding technologies used in large-scale computer networks such as Internet Service Providers (e.g., Swisscom or Deutsche Telekom), Content Delivery Networks (e.g., Netflix) and Data Centers (e.g., Google). Besides covering the fundamentals, the course will be “hands-on” and will enable students to play with the technologies in realistic network environments, and even implement some of them on their own during labs and a final group project.
InhaltThe course will cover advanced topics in Internet routing and forwarding such as:

- Tunneling
- Hierarchical routing
- Traffic Engineering and Load Balancing
- Virtual Private Networks
- Quality of Service/Queuing/Scheduling
- IP Multicast
- Fast Convergence
- Network virtualization
- Network programmability (OpenFlow, P4)
- Network measurements

The course will be divided in two main blocks. The first block (~10 weeks) will interleave classical lectures with practical exercises and labs. The second block (~4 weeks) will consist of a practical project which will be performed in small groups (~3 students). During the second block, lecture slots will be replaced by feedback sessions where students will be able to ask questions and get feedback about their project. The last week of the semester will be dedicated to student presentations and demonstrations.
SkriptLecture notes and material will be made available before each course on the course website.
LiteraturRelevant references will be made available through the course website.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesPrerequisites: Communication Networks (227-0120-00L) or equivalents / good programming skills (in any language) are expected as both the exercices and the final project will involve coding.
263-3900-01LCommunication Networks Seminar Information Belegung eingeschränkt - Details anzeigen
Number of participants limited to 20.

The deadline for deregistering expires at the end of the second week of the semester. Students who are still registered after that date, but do not attend the seminar, will officially fail the seminar.
2 KP2SA. Singla, L. Vanbever
KurzbeschreibungWe explore recent advances in networking by reading high quality research papers, and discussing open research opportunities, most of which are suitable for students to later take up as thesis or semester projects.
LernzielThe objectives are (a) to understand the state-of-the-art in the field; (b) to learn to read, present and critique papers; (c) to engage in discussion and debate about research questions; and (d) to identify opportunities for new research.

Students are expected to attend the entire seminar, choose a topic for presentation from a given list, make a presentation on that topic, and lead the discussion. Further, for each reading, every student needs to submit a review before the in-class discussion. Students are evaluated on their submitted reviews, their presentation and discussion leadership, and participation in seminar discussions.
LiteraturA program will be posted here: https://ndal.ethz.ch/courses/networks-seminar.html, comprising of a list of papers the seminar group will cover.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesAn undergraduate-level understanding of networking, such that the student is familiar with concepts like reliable transport protocols (like TCP) and basics of Internet routing. ETH courses that fulfill this requirement: Computer Networks (252-0064-00L) and Communication Networks (227-0120-00L). Similar courses at other universities are also sufficient.