Autumn Semester 2020 takes place in a mixed form of online and classroom teaching.
Please read the published information on the individual courses carefully.

Bart Clarysse: Catalogue data in Spring Semester 2018

Name Prof. Dr. Bart Clarysse
FieldEntrepreneurship
Address
Professur Entrepreneurship
ETH Zürich, WEV H 311
Weinbergstr. 56/58
8092 Zürich
SWITZERLAND
E-mailbclarysse@ethz.ch
DepartmentManagement, Technology, and Economics
RelationshipFull Professor

NumberTitleECTSHoursLecturers
351-0778-00LDiscovering Management
Entry level course in management for BSc, MSc and PHD students at all levels not belonging to D-MTEC.
This course can be complemented with Discovering Management (Excercises) 351-0778-01L.
3 credits3GB. Clarysse, M. Ambühl, S. Brusoni, L. De Cuyper, E. Fleisch, G. Grote, V. Hoffmann, T. Netland, G. von Krogh, F. von Wangenheim
AbstractDiscovering Management offers an introduction to the field of business management and entrepreneurship for engineers and natural scientists. The module provides an overview of the principles of management, teaches knowledge about management that is highly complementary to the students' technical knowledge, and provides a basis for advancing the knowledge of the various subjects offered at D-MTEC.
ObjectiveThe objective of this course is to introduce the students to the relevant topics of the management literature and give them a good introduction in entrepreneurship topics too. The course is a series of lectures on the topics of strategy, innovation, marketing, corporate social responsibility, and productions and operations management. These different lectures provide the theoretical and conceptual foundations of management. In addition, students are required to work in teams on a project. The purpose of this project is to analyse the innovative needs of a large multinational company and develop a business case for the company to grow.
ContentDiscovering Management aims to broaden the students' understanding of the principles of business management, emphasizing the interdependence of various topics in the development and management of a firm. The lectures introduce students not only to topics relevant for managing large corporations, but also touch upon the different aspects of starting up your own venture. The lectures will be presented by the respective area specialists at D-MTEC.
The course broadens the view and understanding of technology by linking it with its commercial applications and with society. The lectures are designed to introduce students to topics related to strategy, corporate innovation, corporate social responsibility, and business model innovation. Practical examples from industry will stimulate the students to critically assess these issues.
Prerequisites / NoticeDiscovering Management is designed to suit the needs and expectations of Bachelor students at all levels as well as Master and PhD students not belonging to D-MTEC. By providing an overview of Business Management, this course is an ideal enrichment of the standard curriculum at ETH Zurich.
No prior knowledge of business or economics is required to successfully complete this course.
351-0778-01LDiscovering Management (Exercises)
Complementary exercises for the module Discovering Managment.

Prerequisite: Participation and successful completion of the module Discovering Management (351-0778-00L) is mandatory.
1 credit1UB. Clarysse, L. De Cuyper
AbstractThis course is offered complementary to the basis course 351-0778-00L, "Discovering Management". The course offers an additional exercise in the form of a project conducted in team.
ObjectiveThis course is offered to complement the course 351-0778-00L. The course offers an additional exercise to the more theoretical and conceptual content of Discovering Management.

While Discovering Management offers an introduction to various management topics, in this course, creative skills will be trained by the business game exercise. It is a participant-centered, team-based learning activity, which provides students with the opportunity to place themselves in the role of Chief Innovation Officer of a large multinational company.
ContentAs the students learn more about the specific case and identify the challenge they are faced with, they will have to develop an innovative business case for this multinational corporation. Doing so, this exercise will provide an insight into the context of managerial problem-solving and corporate innovation, and enhance the students' appreciation for the complex tasks companies and managers deal with. The exercise presents a realistic model of a company and provides a valuable learning platform to integrate the increasingly important development of the skills and competences required to identify entrepreneurial opportunities, analyse the future business environment and successfully respond to it by taking systematic decisions, e.g. critical assessment of technological possibilities.
363-1030-00LDigital Entrepreneurship Sprint Restricted registration - show details
To guarantee a high standard of entrepreneurial thinking students, we require a letter of motivation which should describe your business idea or the entrepreneurial motivation. Interested students send their letter of motivation together with their CV via E-Mail to Jana Thiel jthiel@ethz.ch no later than February 18, 2018.
3 credits2GB. Clarysse, J. Thiel
AbstractThe seminar aims at students from HSG and ETH Zürich who are motivated to push their own business idea forward or want to act as co-founders.
They should be interested in aspirational business ideas with a technology focus and perceive entrepreneurship as a career option.
ObjectiveThe seminar provides insights into conceptual knowledge and methods for the development of scalable business models. Through interdisciplinary exchange (HSG & ETHZ students), lecturers from the participating institutions, entrepreneurs and investors participants will learn methods and approaches to validate and pitch innovative business ideas.
ContentThe seminar consists of four all-day sessions (March 1, 2, 8 and 9):

Part 1 - The business idea and team-matching
Part 2 - Validation, prototyping & testing
Part 3 - Business Modells, metrics and financials
Part 4 - The business concept presentation

The first two days will take place at ETHZ whereas the final two days take place in St. Gallen. Travel costs will not be reimbursed.

The task throughout the course will be to develop a technology oriented, knowledge-intensive and sustainable business idea in teams of three to four students. Starting from the business idea, students will develop a business model which shows in detail the sustainability over a medium term. The subsequent quantification of the business model will lead to a comprehensive business concept, which has to be visualised and presented in form of a pitch deck. The students will be coached intensively by the lecturers. The connection to practice is provided by the involvement of entrepreneurs and investors.

Throughout the course, company and equity financing will be taught. Highly promising business ideas can be promoted further by the lecturers and the HSG Gründer Lab. Next to the active participation during the lectures (20%), two presentations of the business concept (30%) as well as the final version of the business concept (50%) will be graded. After the presentation, the students will have time to complement the pitch deck with further product-, technology-, market- and financial-related information and to implement the jury's feedback.
Lecture notesNo script, just do.
LiteratureAlexander Osterwalder, Yves Pigneur, Business Model Generation: A Handbook for Visionaries, Game Changers, and Challengers, 2010, John Wiley & Sons.
Steven Blank: Four Steps to the Epiphany, 2013, K&S Ranch.
Eric Ries: The Lean Startup, 2012, Redline Wirtschaft.
Prerequisites / NoticeThis course requires highly motivated students. We therefore require a letter of motivation (one page) for admission. In this letter, you should briefly describe your business idea or your entrepreneurial motivation. Please, also state your commitment to attend all four course days.
363-1077-00LEntrepreneurship3 credits2GB. Clarysse
AbstractThis course introduces the various elements important to start an innovative business. These are: insights into how technology as a context shapes opportunities to start a business, assessing opportunities, protecting one's idea and technology, market testing and feedback, how to develop a team, raising investment and deal evaluation, use of novel financing sources, development of term sheets.
ObjectiveThis course enables to understand:
How technologies develop from science to commercial products
What kind of entrepreneurial opportunities emerge from this cycle
How assumptions are tested in the market and evolve into business plans
What the importance is of founding teams and how they are fit together
How to raise money from various sources such as crowd funding, ICO, business angels and venture capitalists
How to negotiate and structure a funding deal
ContentThe course consists of 7 sessions of 4 hours, every other week. The first 2 hours typically cover the content of the session, while in the last 2 hours students work in teams to apply the content in specific case settings.

The course is structured as follows:

In session 1, we discuss how science develops into technologies that are eventually commercialized into products ...We discuss how technology entrepreneurs can create ventures based upon the technology they work on, the demand they see in their environment or just through the mere aspiration of creating a company. We specifically focus on how these companies can create value in the absence of clear customer revenues and what the eventual outcome is of such a venture.

Session 2 introduces the concept of "appropriability". For entrepreneurs, especially in a technology environment, it is very important to think about how they can appropriate value from the ideas they develop and the products they introduce in the market. Such appropriation can be enabled through legal mechanisms such as IP or might be facilitated through the way in which the company is set up. An extensive overview is given of different IP forms and a practical case of how to appropriate value is discussed.

In Session 3, we discuss how value can be delivered in an industry, how negotiation power can be assessed, what different actors need to be taken into consideration when determining the value flow in a network and, eventually, how to think of a business model annex business plan.

Session 4 touches upon a number of HR questions and managerial challenges for the budding entrepreneur: Is it better to go alone or in a team? Are there more or less successful compositions of an entrepreneurial team and if so, where to find the right co-conspirators? How to split roles and responsibilities and what are the right incentive mechanisms to align all co-founders? In this session, we will look at these questions and discuss empirical evidence and theories as to how to build and manage successful entrepreneurial teams.

In Session 5, we look at how entrepreneurs do market research and how different types of market research help them to develop their business. In addition, you will get an overview of various forms of prototyping, and of how the use of such prototyping can help you test the market and incorporate market feedback into your product or service.

Session 6 introduces you in the world of raising capital. You get an overview of the various sources of capital including business angels, accelerators, crowd funding, venture capital and corporate capital and you will see how a term sheet is formed. Guest speakers from the financing industry will answer your questions with regards to getting finance.

Session 7 includes a negotiation game. The negotiation game allows you to go through the different conditions of a term sheet including the valuation of a start-up, the lock-in of the management team, the liquidation options and the division of power. The aim is to learn how to use each of these terms in a practical setting and be able to write a term sheet with an investor.

Each of the sessions includes a mix of theory (usually 2 hours), case study/exercise work and occasional guest presentations (usually 1 hour). The course is an excellent introduction to 'do it yourself courses' such as the Deep Science Sprint, the Digital Entrepreneurship Course,..
Lecture notesPowerpoint slides are provided ahead of each session and provide together with Clarysse and Kiefer (2011) the core course material.

In addition to the slides and handbook, most sessions have case material (uploaded ahead of the course and to be read BEFORE the lecture in which the case will be discussed). Video material is part of the core syllabus.
LiteratureClarysse, B. & S. Kiefer The Smart Entrepreneur (Elliott & Thompson, 2011) is used as core reading material.

In addition, each session also has "advanced reading" papers, which are useful to deepen your knowledge about the specific subject under discussion. It is sufficient to read the introduction and the conclusions of the papers to get the core idea.

The papers are uploaded through Moodle, the book is available for sale at Amazon.com or can be ordered from any book store.
Prerequisites / NoticeNo special background is needed.
363-1104-00LAdvanced Studies in Entrepreneurship Restricted registration - show details
Does not take place this semester.
Master students with a strong interest in research in the fields of entrepreneurship, innovation and organization theory and phd students
3 credits2GB. Clarysse
AbstractThe course covers foundational papers and research streams related to entrepreneurship and targets masters and PhD students with a research interest in entrepreneurship, innovation and organization theory. For each session, the students are required to read the assigned five research papers and prepare for an in-depth discussion thereof. Active preparation and participation are a key requirement.
ObjectiveCourse participants will

- acquire knowledge about foundations and trends in entrepreneurship research
- learn how to read, analyze and discuss academic papers
- be able to identify new lines of research based on the discussed materials
- improve their own writing of research papers
ContentSession topics:

- Founder & Entrepreneurial Identity
- Hybrid Organizations & (Social Entrepreneurship)
- Entrepreneurship Theory and the Individual-Opportunity Nexus
- Institutional Theory & Entrepreneurship
- Technology Market Linking & Search in Entrepreneurship
- International Entrepreneurship
- Bottom-up Innovation / Corporate Entrepreneurship
- Teams & Entrepreneurship
Lecture notesAll papers are accessible through the ETH Library or will be provided at the start of the course.
LiteratureSee Syllabus
Prerequisites / NoticeFor more details, please check the course page: http://www.entrepreneurship.ethz.ch/education/advanced-studies-in-entrepreneurship.html