From 2 November 2020, the autumn semester 2020 will take place online. Exceptions: Courses that can only be carried out with on-site presence.
Please note the information provided by the lecturers via e-mail.

Manu Kapur: Catalogue data in Autumn Semester 2018

Name Prof. Dr. Manu Kapur
FieldLearning Sciences and Higher Education
Address
Professur für Lernwissenschaften
ETH Zürich, RZ J 3
Clausiusstrasse 59
8092 Zürich
SWITZERLAND
Telephone+41 44 632 25 89
E-mailmanukapur@ethz.ch
URLhttp://www.manukapur.com
DepartmentHumanities, Social and Political Sciences
RelationshipFull Professor

NumberTitleECTSHoursLecturers
851-0252-04LBehavioral Studies Colloquium2 credits2KU. Brandes, V. Amati, H.‑D. Daniel, D. Helbing, C. Hölscher, M. Kapur, R. Schubert, C. Stadtfeld, E. Stern
AbstractThis colloquium offers an opportunity for students to discuss their ongoing research and scientific ideas in the behavioral sciences, both at the micro- and macro-levels of cognitive, behavioral and social science. It also offers an opportunity for students from other disciplines to discuss their research ideas in relation to behavioral science. The colloquium also features invited research talks.
ObjectiveStudents know and can apply autonomously up-to-date investigation methods and techniques in the behavioral sciences. They achieve the ability to develop their own ideas in the field and to communicate their ideas in oral presentations and in written papers. The credits will be obtained by a written report of approximately 10 pages.
ContentThis colloquium offers an opportunity for students to discuss their ongoing research and scientific ideas in the behavioral sciences, both at the micro- and macro-levels of cognitive, behavioral and social science. It also offers an opportunity for students from other disciplines to discuss their ideas in so far as they have some relation to behavioral science. The possible research areas are wide and may include theoretical as well as empirical approaches in Social Psychology and Research on Higher Education, Sociology, Modeling and Simulation in Sociology, Decision Theory and Behavioral Game Theory, Economics, Research on Learning and Instruction, Cognitive Psychology and Cognitive Science. Ideally the students (from Bachelor, Master, Ph.D. and Post-Doc programs) have started to start work on their thesis or on any other term paper.
Course credit can be obtained either based on a talk in the colloquium plus a written essay, or by writing an essay about a topic related to one of the other talks in the course. Students interested in giving a talk should contact the course organizers (Ziegler, Kapur) before the first session of the semester. Priority will be given to advanced / doctoral students for oral presentations. The course credits will be obtained by a written report of approximately 10 pages. The colloquium also serves as a venue for invited talks by researchers from other universities and institutions related to behavioral and social sciences.
851-0252-12LThe Science of Learning From Failure Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 30.
2 credits2SM. Kapur, D. Trninic, E. Ziegler
AbstractWe can learn from failure. But, what does “failure” mean? And, what, how, and why do we learn from failure? This course covers research from the cognitive, educational, and learning sciences that addresses the role of failure in human learning. Students will critically examine how failure affects thinking, knowledge, creativity, problem-solving, and motivation.
ObjectiveStudents will:
- Critically read and analyze articles on research that addresses failure in learning
- Participate in in-class problem-solving activities around research in failure
- Discuss and reflect upon topics in both online and face-to-face formats
- Engage in activities through the online platform
- Complete a final paper on a subtopic related to failure in learning

By the end of the course, students should be able to:
- Demonstrate a critical understanding of the role that failure plays in learning
- Discuss how and why failure can benefit learning
- Discuss how and why failure does not facilitate learning
- Apply understanding to a related sub-topic
ContentWe learn from our mistakes, or rather, we hope that we do. Another way to say this is that we can learn from failure. But, what does “failure” mean? What, how, and why do we learn from failure? This course covers research from the cognitive, educational, and learning sciences that addresses the role of failure in human learning. Students will critically examine how failure affects development of knowledge, creativity, problem-solving, and general thinking and learning. More specifically, they will have the opportunity to question and evaluate the potential relationships between the facets around failure within individual, interactional, cultural, societal, and global contexts through seminal readings and problem-solving activities. Students from any discipline are welcome to this course to learn more about how failure can be harnessed to improve our knowledge, capabilities, innovations, teamwork, and contribute to the larger global world.
Prerequisites / NoticeThis seminar is an interactive course, thus attendance and classroom participation are required. Processing of online tasks is a requirement for obtaining credit points.