Rolf Kipfer: Catalogue data in Autumn Semester 2016

Name Prof. Dr. Rolf Kipfer
Address
EAWAG
Überlandstrasse 133
Abteilung Wasserresourcen und Trin
8600 Dübendorf
SWITZERLAND
Telephone044 823 55 30
Fax044 823 52 10
E-mailrkipfer@ethz.ch
DepartmentEarth Sciences
RelationshipAdjunct Professor

NumberTitleECTSHoursLecturers
701-0401-AALHydrosphere Information
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
3 credits6RR. Kipfer, C. Roques
AbstractQualitative and quantitative understanding of the physical processes that control the terrestrial water cycle. Energy and mass exchange, mixing and transport processes are described and the coupling of the hydrosphere with the atmosphere and the solid Earth are discussed.
ObjectiveQualitative and quantitative understanding of the physical processes that control the terrestrial water cycle. Energy and mass exchange, mixing and transport processes are described and the coupling of the hydrosphere with the atmosphere and the solid Earth are discussed.
ContentTopics of the course.
Physical properties of water (i.e. density and equation of state)
- global water resources
Exchange at boundaries
- energy (thermal & kinetic), gas exchange
Mixing and transport processes in open waters
- vertical stratification, large scale transport
- turbulence and mixing
- mixing and exchange processes in rivers
Groundwater and its dynamics
- ground water as part of the terrestrial water cycle
- ground water hydraulics, Darcy's law
- aquifers and their properties
- hydrochemistry and tracer
- ground water use
Case studies
- 1. Water as resource, 2. Water and climate
Lecture notesIn addition to the self-learning literature handouts are distributed.
LiteratureTextbooks for self-studying.
Surface water.
'Physics and Chemistry in Lakes', ed: Lerman, A., Imboden, D.M., and Gat, J., Springer Verlag, 1995:
Chapter 4: Imboden, D.M., and Wüest, A. 'Mixing Mechanisms in Lakes'
'Environmental Organic Chemistry', ed: Schwarzenbach, R., Imboden, D. M., and Gschwend, Ph., Willey, 2002:
Chapter 6.4: Air-Water Partitioning
Chapter 19.2: Bottleneck Boundaries

Ground water:
Fetter, C.W. 'Applied Hydrogeology', Prentice Hall, 2002 (4th edition):
Chapters 1 - 6, 8, 10, 11.

Optional additional readers.
Park, Ch., 2001, The Environment, Routledge, 2001
Price, M., 1996. Introducing groundwater. Chapman & Hall, London u.a.


a) Park, Ch., 2001, The Environment, Routledge, 2001
b) Price, M., 1996. Introducing groundwater. Chapman & Hall, London u.a.
701-0401-00LHydrosphere3 credits2VR. Kipfer, C. Roques
AbstractQualitative and quantitative understanding of the physical processes that control the terrestrial water cycle. Energy and mass exchange, mixing and transport processes are described and the coupling of the hydrosphere with the atmosphere and the solid Earth are discussed.
ObjectiveQualitative and quantitative understanding of the physical processes that control the terrestrial water cycle. Energy and mass exchange, mixing and transport processes are described and the coupling of the hydrosphere with the atmosphere and the solid Earth are discussed.
ContentTopics of the course.
Physical properties of water (i.e. density and equation of state)
- global water resources
Exchange at boundaries
- energy (thermal & kinetic), gas exchange
Mixing and transport processes in open waters
- vertical stratification, large scale transport
- turbulence and mixing
- mixing and exchange processes in rivers
Groundwater and its dynamics
- ground water as part of the terrestrial water cycle
- ground water hydraulics, Darcy's law
- aquifers and their properties
- hydrochemistry and tracer
- ground water use
Case studies
- 1. Water as resource, 2. Water and climate
Lecture notesIn addition to the suggested literature handouts are distributed.
LiteratureSuggested literature.
a) Park, Ch., 2001, The Environment, Routledge, 2001
b) Price, M., 1996. Introducing groundwater. Chapman & Hall, London u.a.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe case studies and the analysis of the questions and problems are integral part of the course.
701-1313-00LIsotopic and Organic Tracers in Biogeochemistry Information 3 credits2GR. Kipfer, S. Ladd
AbstractThe course introduces the scientific concepts and typical applications of tracers in biogeochemistry. The course covers stable and radioactive isotopes, geochemical tracers and biomarkers and their application in biogeochemical processes as well as regional and global cycles. The course provides essential theoretical background for the lab course "Isotopic and Organic Tracers Laboratory".
ObjectiveThe course aims at understanding the fractionation of stable isotopes in biogeochemical processes. Students learn to know the origin and decay modes of relevant radiogenic isotopes. They discover the spectrum of possible geochemical tracers and biomarkers, their potential and limitations and get familiar with important applications
ContentGeogenic and cosmogenic radionuclides (sources, decay chains);
stable isotopes in biogeochemistry (nataural abundance, fractionation);
geochemical tracers for processes such as erosion, productivity, redox fronts; biomarkers for specific microbial processes.
Lecture noteshandouts will be provided for every chapter
LiteratureA list of relevant books and papers will be provided
Prerequisites / NoticeStudents should have a basic knowledge of biogeochemical processes (BSc course on Biogeochemical processes in aquatic systems or equivalent)
701-1333-00LIsotopic and Organic Tracers Laboratory Restricted registration - show details 3 credits4PR. Kipfer, S. Ladd
AbstractThis course will illustrate how different tracers and isotopes are used in natural systems. Here especially the processes (transformation, timescales) that take place and can be revealed by tracers/isotopes will be demonstrated but also flux rates will be calculated using different tracers.
ObjectiveStudents know how to use tracers/isotopes to investigate/understand ecosystems
They will understand the methods and analytical devices related to tracer/isotope work
Have a feeling for timescales on which natural processes occur
Students will be able to apply different sampling techniques in aquatic sciences
ContentBasics:
O,H isotopes as tracers for mixing in aquatic systems
Carbon isotopes as tracer for methane oxidation
210Pb, 137Cs as a tracer for sedimentation rate/mixing
SF6, Neon, He as tracers for exchange processes at the air/water interface

Case assessment:
Sampling of a Swiss lake (Rotsee)
Sampling techniques for different elements
Sample preparation for different techniques
Measurements at isotope mass spectrometer/gamma counter
Interpretation of results from the special sampling campaign and in a broader context