Markus Niederberger: Catalogue data in Autumn Semester 2017

Award: The Golden Owl
Name Prof. Dr. Markus Niederberger
FieldMultifunctional Materials
Address
Dep. Materialwissenschaft
ETH Zürich, HCI F 509
Vladimir-Prelog-Weg 1-5/10
8093 Zürich
SWITZERLAND
Telephone+41 44 633 63 90
E-mailmarkus.niederberger@mat.ethz.ch
URLhttp://www.multimat.mat.ethz.ch
DepartmentMaterials
RelationshipFull Professor

NumberTitleECTSHoursLecturers
327-0103-00LIntroduction to Materials Science3 credits3GM. Niederberger, L. Heyderman, N. Spencer, P. Uggowitzer
AbstractFundamental knowledge and understanding of the atomistic and macroscopic concepts of material science.
ObjectiveBasic concepts in materials science.
ContentContents:
Atomic structure
Atomic bonds
Crystalline structure, perfection - imperfection
Diffusion
Mechanical and thermal properties
Phase diagrams
Kinetics
Structural materials
Electric, magnetic and optical properties of materials
Surfaces
Materials selection criteria
Lecture noteshttp://www.multimat.mat.ethz.ch/education/lectures/intro.html
LiteratureJames F. Shackelford
Introduction to Materials Science for Engineers
5th Ed., Prentice Hall, New Jersey, 2000
327-0503-AALCeramics I
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
3 credits6RM. Niederberger, T. Graule, A. R. Studart
AbstractIntroduction to ceramic processing
ObjectiveThe aim is the understanding of the basic principles of ceramic processing.
ContentBasic chemical processes for powder production.
Liquid-phase synthesis methods.
Sol-Gel processes.
Classical crystallization theory.
Gas phase reactions.
Basics of the collidal chemistry for suspension preparation and control.
Characterization techniques for powders and colloids.
Shaping techniques for bulk components and thin films.
Sintering processes and microstructural control.
Lecture notesSee:
http://www.multimat.mat.ethz.ch/education/lectures/ceramics.html
LiteratureBooks and references will be provided on the lecture notes.
327-0503-00LCeramics I3 credits2V + 1UM. Niederberger, T. Graule, A. R. Studart
AbstractIntroduction to ceramic processing.
ObjectiveThe aim is the understanding of the basic principles of ceramic processing.
ContentBasic chemical processes for powder production.
Liquid-phase synthesis methods.
Sol-Gel processes.
Classical crystallization theory.
Gas phase reactions.
Basics of the collidal chemistry for suspension preparation and control.
Characterization techniques for powders and colloids.
Shaping techniques for bulk components and thin films.
Sintering processes and microstructural control.
Lecture notesSee:
http://www.multimat.mat.ethz.ch/education/lectures/ceramics.html
LiteratureBooks and references will be given on the lecture notes.
327-1203-00LComplex Materials I: Synthesis & Assembly5 credits4GM. Niederberger, D. Kundu, A. Lauria
AbstractIntroduction to materials synthesis concepts based on the assembly of differently shaped objects of varying chemical nature and length scales
ObjectiveThe aim is a) to learn how to design and create objects as building blocks with a particular shape and a defined recognition pattern, b) to understand the chemistry that allows for the creation of such hard and soft objects within a certain size range, and c) to master the concepts to assemble these objects into hierarchically structured materials.
ContentThe course is divided into two parts: I) synthesis of 0-, 1-, 2-, and 3-dimensional building blocks with a length scale from nm to µm, and II) assembly of these building blocks into 1-, 2- and 3-dimensional structures over several length scales up to cm.
In part I, various methodologies for the synthesis of the building blocks will be discussed, including Turkevich and Brust-Schiffrin-method for gold nanoparticles, hot-injection for semiconducting quantum dots, aqueous and nonaqueous sol-gel chemistry for metal oxides, or gas-and liquid-phase routes to carbon nanostructures.
Part II is focused on self- and directed assembly methods that can be used to create higher order architectures from those building blocks connecting the microscopic with the macroscopic world. Examples include photonic crystals, nanocrystal solids, colloidal molecules, mesocrystals or particle-based foams and aerogels.
Lecture noteshttp://www.multimat.mat.ethz.ch/education/lectures/complex_lecture.html
LiteratureReferences to original articles and reviews for further reading will be provided on the lecture notes.
Prerequisites / Notice1) Einführung Materialwissenschaft (327-0103-00L), in particular atomic structure, chemical bonds and basics of magnetic, electronic and optical properties of materials
2) Ceramics I (327-0503-00L), in particular liquid-phase processes, sol-gel processes and interparticle interactions
3) Kristallographie (327-0104-00L), in particular structure of crystalline solids
4) Methoden der Materialcharakterisierung (327-0504-00L)
5) Basic concepts of polymer science, in particular polymer synthesis and polymer characterization