Mirko Meboldt: Catalogue data in Autumn Semester 2017

Name Prof. Dr. Mirko Meboldt
FieldProduct Development and Engineering Design
Address
Chair of Product Dev.& Eng. Design
ETH Zürich, LEE O 210
Leonhardstrasse 21
8092 Zürich
SWITZERLAND
Award: The Golden Owl
Telephone+41 44 632 72 38
E-mailmeboldtm@ethz.ch
DepartmentMechanical and Process Engineering
RelationshipFull Professor

NumberTitleECTSHoursLecturers
151-0079-40LCardiovascular Interventions Simulator for Surgents Restricted registration - show details
This course is part of a one-year course. The 14 credit points will be issued at the end of FS2018 with new enrolling for the same Focus-Project in FS2018.

For MAVT BSc and ITET BSc only.

Prerequisites for the focus projects:
a. Basis examination successfully passed
b. Block 1 and 2 successfully passed

For enrollment, please contact the D-MAVT Student Administration.
0 credits15AM. Meboldt
AbstractStudents develop and build a product from A-Z! They work in teams and independently, learn to structure problems, to identify solutions, system analysis and simulations, as well as presentation and documentation techniques. They build the product with access to a machine shop and state of the art engineering tools (Matlab, Simulink, etc).
ObjectiveThe various objectives of the Focus Project are:
- Synthesizing and deepening the theoretical knowledge from the basic courses of the 1. - 4. semester
- Team organization, work in teams, increase of interpersonal skills
- Independence, initiative, independent learning of new topic contents
- Problem structuring, solution identification in indistinct problem definitions, searches of information
- System description and simulation
- Presentation methods, writing of a document
- Ability to make decisions, implementation skills
- Workshop and industrial contacts
- Learning and recess of special knowledge
- Control of most modern engineering tools (Matlab, Simulink, CAD, CAE, PDM)
151-0301-00LMachine Elements2 credits1V + 1UM. Meboldt, Q. Lohmeyer
AbstractIntroduction to machine elements and mechanical systems as basics of product development. Case studies of their application in products and systems.
ObjectiveThe students get an overview of the main mechanical components (machine elements) which are used in mechanical engineering. Selected examples will demonstrate how these can be assembled into functional parts and complete systems such as machinery, tools or actuators. At the same time, also the problem of production (production-oriented design) is discussed.
In concurrent lectures / exercises "technical drawing and CAD" the design implementation will be practiced.
Content- Innovation Process: A Quick Overview
- Stages of the planning and design process
- Requirements for a design and technical implementation
- Choice of materials - Basic principles of a material-specific design
- Manufacturing process - fundamentals of a production-oriented design
- Connections, fuses, seals
- Machine-standard elements
- Storage & guides
- Transmission and its components
- Drives

The idea of machine elements is complemented by case studies and illustrated.
Lecture notesThe lecture slides will be published beforehand on the website of the pd|z.
Prerequisites / NoticeFor Bachelor studies in Mechanical and Process Engineering, the lecture "Maschinenelemente" (HS) is examined together with "Innovationsprozess" (FS) in the exam "Basisprüfung Maschinenelemente and Innovationsprozess".
151-3201-00LStudies on Engineering Design3 credits6AK. Shea, P. Ermanni, M. Meboldt
AbstractThis course introduces students to the exciting world of Engineering Design research, which crosses disciplines and requires a variety of skills. Each student identifies a topic in Engineering Design for further investigation, either based on those proposed or a new, agreed topic.
ObjectiveStudents gain their first knowledge of Engineering Design research and carry out their first, independent scientific study. Students learn how to read scientific literature and critically analyze and discuss them, gain hands-on experience in the area and learn how to document their work concisely through a report and short presentation.
ContentStudents identify 5-10 journal articles, or scientifically equivalent, in consultation with the supervisor and can define a small, related project in the area to gain hands-on experience. In the beginning of the semester, students develop with the supervisor a 2-page proposal outlining the objective of the study, tasks to be carried out and a brief time plan for the work. Once agreed, the project starts resulting in a report combining the state-of-art literature review and project results, if carried out.

The students work independently on a study of selected topics in the field of Engineering Design. They start with a selection of the topic, identify scientific papers for the literature research and can define a small, related project. The results (e.g. state-of-the-art literature review and small project results where defined) are evaluated with respect to predefined criteria.
Prerequisites / NoticeStudents take this course in parallel to the Lecture "Grand Challenges in Engineering Design". A general meeting will be held in the beginning of the semester to propose topics for the studies. Studies are carried out individually and can be the pre-study for a Bachelor thesis.
151-3203-00LGrand Challenges in Engineering Design1 credit3SP. Ermanni, M. Meboldt, K. Shea
AbstractThe course is structured in three main blocks, each of them addressing a specific grand challenge in engineering design. Each block is composed of an introductory lecture and two to three talks from various speakers from academia and industry.
ObjectiveThe aim of the course is to introduce students to the engineering design research and practice in a multitude of Mechanical Engineering disciplines and convey knowledge from both academia and industry about state of the art methods, tools and processes.
ContentThe students are exposed to a variety of topics in the field of Engineering Design. Topics are bundled in three main grand challenges and include an introductory lecture held by one of the responsible Professors and 2-3 talks each, addressing specific issues and examples. The success of the course is largely dependant on active involvement of the students. The students also individually prepare and present a topic related to the grand challenges presented in the lectures.
Prerequisites / NoticeOffered in English and German
151-3215-00LDesign for Additive Manufacturing Restricted registration - show details 4 credits2GM. Meboldt, C. Klahn
AbstractThis course is focusing on design, development and innovation with Additive Manufacturing (AM) production technologies. Part of the course is a project, where students design and produce their own functional AM part in metal, with selective laser melting (SLM). The different designs of the students will be analyzed and an the design will be optimized.
ObjectiveTo provide a fundamental knowledge of Additive Manufacturing (AM) and generate experience knowledge in the field of the design for AM (DfAM), product development and value creation with AM.
ContentParallel to the lectures the students design SLM prototypes in a project. Further, the prototypes going to be manufactured and possible optimizations will be discussed in the group.
The cours is addressing the following topics:
- AM-Processes including SLM, SLS and FDM
- AM-Principles
- Autofab-Introduction
- AM-Guidelines
- Value added chain of AM
- AM-Quality management
- Microstructures and materials for AM
- Industry cases of AM
Lecture notesScript and handouts are available in PDF-format.
Prerequisites / NoticeMaster's students
166-0203-00LAgile and User-centered Innovation Restricted registration - show details
Only for MAS in Future Transport Systems and CAS in Future Transport Systems: Technology Potential.
1.5 credits1GM. Meboldt, J. Heck
AbstractFor companies it is essential to realise products quickly, economically and in a customer-oriented way. In this context approaches to agile and user-centred product development such as Scrum, Kanban and Design Thinking are increasing in importance. Compared to traditional product development methods, agile methods promise higher quality and customer satisfaction coupled with reduced expenditure.
ObjectiveDesign and realisation of product development projects for future transport systems: Participants are familiar with the methods and procedures of agile and user-centred product development and are able to apply them profitably in their enterprises.
ContentParticipants define an innovation theme themselves in groups, and a selection of topics is then drawn from this theme for module group work. The module takes participants through the whole process, from the analysis of target groups and their requirements through project conception and planning to implementation in example form. The course is practical and uses concrete examples. At the end of the module participants will have deployed the methods of agile and user-centred product development to work very practically through a theme they have developed themselves, and will have become familiar with the typical application scenarios, advantages and hurdles associated with these methods.
Lecture notesDistributed at start of module
LiteratureDistributed at start of module
Prerequisites / NoticeAnnounced to students of the of the MAS / CAS at the beginning of the term
227-0981-00LCross-Disciplinary Research and Development in Medicine and Engineering Restricted registration - show details
A maximum of 12 medical degree students and 12 (biomedical) engineering degree students can be admitted, their number should be equal.
4 credits2V + 2AV. Kurtcuoglu, D. de Julien de Zelicourt, M. Meboldt, M. Schmid Daners, O. Ullrich
AbstractCross-disciplinary collaboration between engineers and medical doctors is indispensable for innovation in health care. This course will bring together engineering students from ETH Zurich and medical students from the University of Zurich to experience the rewards and challenges of such interdisciplinary work in a project based learning environment.
ObjectiveThe main goal of this course is to demonstrate the differences in communication between the fields of medicine and engineering. Since such differences become the most evident during actual collaborative work, the course is based on a current project in physiology research that combines medicine and engineering. For the engineering students, the specific aims of the course are to:

- Acquire a working understanding of the anatomy and physiology of the investigated system;
- Identify the engineering challenges in the project and communicate them to the medical students;
- Develop and implement, together with the medical students, solution strategies for the identified challenges;
- Present the found solutions to a cross-disciplinary audience.
ContentAfter a general introduction to interdisciplinary communication and detailed background on the collaborative project, the engineering students will receive tailored lectures on the anatomy and physiology of the relevant system. They will then team up with medical students who have received a basic introduction to engineering methodology to collaborate on said project. In the process, they will be coached both by lecturers from ETH Zurich and the University of Zurich, receiving lectures customized to the project. The course will end with each team presenting their solution to a cross-disciplinary audience.
Lecture notesHandouts and relevant literature will be provided.
363-1065-00LDesign Thinking: Human-Centred Solutions to Real World Challenges Restricted registration - show details
Due to didactic reasons, the number of participants is limited to 30.

All interested students are invited to apply for this course by sending a by sending a short motivation letter until the 18 of September 2017 to Florian Rittiner (frittiner@ethz.ch).

Additionally please enroll via mystudies. Please note that all students are put on the waiting list and that your current position on the waiting list is irrelevant, as places will be assigned after the first lecture on the basis of your motivation letter and commitment for the class.
5 credits5GA. Cabello Llamas, F. Rittiner, S. Brusoni, C. Hölscher, M. Meboldt
AbstractThe goal of this course is to engage students in a multidisciplinary collaboration to tackle real world problems. Following a design thinking approach, students will work in teams to solve a set of design challenges that are organized as a one-week, a three-week, and a final six-week project in collaboration with an external project partner.

Information and application: http://sparklabs.ch/
ObjectiveDuring the course, students will learn about different design thinking methods and tools. This will enable them to:
- Generate deep insights through the systematic observation and interaction of key stakeholders (empathy).
- Engage in collaborative ideation with a multidisciplinary team.
- Rapidly prototype and iteratively test ideas and concepts by using various materials and techniques.
ContentThe purpose of this course is to equip the students with methods and tools to tackle a broad range of problems. Following a Design Thinking approach, the students will learn how to observe and interact with key stakeholders in order to develop an in-depth understanding of what is truly important and emotionally meaningful to the people at the center of a problem. Based on these insights, the students ideate on possible solutions and immediately validated them through quick iterations of prototyping and testing using different tools and materials. The students will work in multidisciplinary teams on a set of challenges that are organized as a one-week, a three-week, and a final six-week project with an external project partner. In this course, the students will learn about the different Design Thinking methods and tools that are needed to generate deep insights, to engage in collaborative ideation, rapid prototyping and iterative testing.

Design Thinking is a deeply human process that taps into the creative abilities we all have, but that get often overlooked by more conventional problem solving practices. It relies on our ability to be intuitive, to recognize patterns, to construct ideas that are emotionally meaningful as well as functional, and to express ourselves through means beyond words or symbols. Design Thinking provides an integrated way by incorporating tools, processes and techniques from design, engineering, the humanities and social sciences to identify, define and address diverse challenges. This integration leads to a highly productive collaboration between different disciplines.

For more information and the application visit: http://sparklabs.ch/
Prerequisites / NoticeOpen mind, ability to manage uncertainty and to work with students from various background. Class attendance and active participation is crucial as much of the learning occurs through the work in teams during class. Therefore, attendance is obligatory for every session. Please also note that the group work outside class is an essential element of this course, so that students must expect an above-average workload.

Please note that the class is designed for full-time MSc students. Interested MAS students need to send an email to Florian Rittiner (frittiner@ethz.ch) to learn about the requirements of the class.
701-0901-00LETH Week 2017: Manufacturing the Future Restricted registration - show details
All ETH Bachelor¿s, Master¿s and exchange students can take part in the ETH week. No prior knowledge is required
1 credit3SR. Knutti, C. Bratrich, S. Brusoni, I. Burgert, A. Cabello Llamas, F. Gramazio, G. Grote, A. Krause, M. Meboldt, A. R. Studart, A. Vaterlaus
AbstractThe ETH Week is an innovative one-week course designed to foster critical thinking and creative learning. Students from all departments as well as professors and external experts will work together in interdisciplinary teams. They will develop interventions that could play a role in solving some of our most pressing global challenges. In 2017, ETH Week will focus on the topic of manufacturing.
Objective- Domain specific knowledge: Students have immersed knowledge about a certain complex, societal topic which will be selected every year. They understand the complex system context of the current topic, by comprehending its scientific, technical, political, social, ecological and economic perspectives.

- Analytical skills: The ETH Week participants are able to structure complex problems systematically using selected methods. They are able to acquire further knowledge and to critically analyze the knowledge in interdisciplinary groups and with experts and the help of team tutors.

- Design skills: The students are able to use their knowledge and skills to develop concrete approaches for problem solving and decision making to a selected problem statement, critically reflect these approaches, assess their feasibility, to transfer them into a concrete form (physical model, prototypes, strategy paper, etc.) and to present this work in a creative way (role-plays, videos, exhibitions, etc.).

- Self-competence: The students are able to plan their work effectively, efficiently and autonomously. By considering approaches from different disciplines they are able to make a judgment and form a personal opinion. In exchange with non-academic partners from business, politics, administration, nongovernmental organizations and media they are able to communicate appropriately, present their results professionally and creatively and convince a critical audience.

- Social competence: The students are able to work in multidisciplinary teams, i.e. they can reflect critically their own discipline, debate with students from other disciplines and experts in a critical-constructive and respectful way and can relate their own positions to different intellectual approaches. They can assess how far they are able to actively make a contribution to society by using their personal and professional talents and skills and as "Change Agents".
ContentThe week is mainly about problem solving and design thinking applied to the complex manufacturing world. During ETH Week students will have the opportunity to work in small interdisciplinary groups, allowing them to critically analyze both their own approaches and those of other disciplines, and to integrate these into their work.

While deepening their knowledge about how manufacturing works, students will be introduced to various methods and tools for generating creative ideas and understand how different people are affected by each part of the system. In addition to lectures and literature, students will acquire knowledge via excursions into the real world, empirical observations, and conversations with researchers and experts.

A key attribute of the ETH Week is that students are expected to find their own problem, rather than just solve the problem that has been handed to them.

Therefore, the first three days of the week will concentrate on identifying a problem the individual teams will work on, while the last two days are focused on generating solutions and communicating the team's ideas.
Prerequisites / NoticeNo prerequisites. Program is open to Bachelor and Masters from all ETH Departments. All students must apply through a competitive application process at www.ethz.ch/ethweek. Participation is subject to successful selection through this competitive process.