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363-0514-00L  Energy Economics and Policy

SemesterSpring Semester 2016
LecturersM. Filippini
Periodicityyearly recurring course
Language of instructionEnglish
CommentIt is recommended for students to have taken a course in introductory microeconomics. If not, they should be familiar with microeconomics as in, for example,"Microeconomics" by Mankiw & Taylor and the appendices 4 and 7 of the book "Microeconomics" by Pindyck & Rubinfeld.


AbstractAn introduction to principles of energy economics and applications using energy policies: demand analysis, economic analysis of energy investments and cost analysis, economics of fossil fuels, economics of electricity, economics of renewable energy, market failures and energy policy, market-based and non-market based instruments, demand side management and regulation of energy industries.
ObjectiveThe students will develop the understanding of economic principles and tools necessary to analyze energy issues and to formulate energy policy instruments. Emphasis will be put on empirical analysis of energy demand and supply, market failures, energy policy instruments, investments in power plants and in energy efficiency technologies and the reform of the electric power sector.
ContentThe course provides an introduction to energy economics principles and policy applications. The core topics are
-Demand analysis
-Economic analysis of energy investments and cost analysis
-Economics of fossil fuels
-Economics of electricity
-Economics of renewable energies
-Market failures and energy policy
-Market oriented and non-market oriented instruments
-Demand side management
-Regulation of energy industries
Literature- International Handbook on the Economics of Energy
by Joanne Evans (Editor), Lester C. Hunt (Editor)

- Energy Economics
Concepts, Issues, Markets and Governance
Bhattacharyya, Subhes C.
1st Edition, 2011, XXVI, 721 p. 267 illus, 83 in color.
Prerequisites / NoticeIt is recommended for students to have taken a course in introductory microeconomics. If not, they should be familiar with microeconomics as in, for example, "Microeconomics" by Mankiw & Taylor and the appendices 4 and 7 of the book "Microeconomics" by Pindyck & Rubinfeld.