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364-0553-00L  Innovation in the Digital Space

SemesterHerbstsemester 2016
DozierendeG. von Krogh
Periodizität2-jährlich wiederkehrende Veranstaltung
LehrveranstaltungFindet dieses Semester nicht statt.
LehrspracheEnglisch


KurzbeschreibungThe purpose of this course is to review and discuss issues in current theory and research relevant to innovation in the digital space.
LernzielThrough in-depth analysis of published work, doctoral candidates will identify and appraise theoretical and empirical studies, formulate research questions, and improve the positioning of their own research within the academic debate.
InhaltThe Internet has a twofold impact on the way individuals and firms innovate. First, firms increasingly draw on digital technology to access and capture innovation-relevant knowledge in their environment. Second, individuals, firms, and other organizations extensively utilize the Internet to create, diffuse, and commercialize new digital products and services. During the past decade, theory and research on innovation in the digital space has flourished and generated extensive insights of relevance to both academia and management practice. This has brought us better understanding of working models, and some fundamental reasons for innovation success or failure. A host of new models and research designs have been created to explore the innovation in the digital space, but these have also brought out many open research questions. We will review some of the existing streams of work, and in the process explore a new research agenda.

Format:
The course is organized in one block of 2 days. The course is a combination of pre-readings, presentations by faculty and students, and discussions. The students prepare presentations of papers in order to facilitate analysis and discussion.
LiteraturInnovation, openness and search:
Cassiman, B., & Veugelers, R. (2006). In search of complementarity in innovation strategy: Internal R&D and external knowledge acquisition. Management Science, 52(1), 68-82.
Foss, N. J., Laursen, K., & Pedersen, T. (2011). Linking customer interaction and innovation: The mediating role of new organizational practices. Organization Science, 22(4), 980-999.
Garriga, H., von Krogh, G., & Spaeth, S. (2013). How constraints and knowledge impact open innovation. Strategic Management Journal, 34(9), 1134-1144.
Laursen, K., & Salter, A. (2005). Open for innovation: The role of openness in explaining innovation performance among UK manufacturing firms. Strategic Management Journal, 27(2), 131-150.

Open source and innovation models:
Henkel, J. (2006). Selective revealing in open innovation processes: The case of embedded Linux. Research Policy, 35(7), 953-969.
Lakhani, K. R., & von Hippel, E. (2003). How open source software works: Free user-to-user assistance. Research Policy, 32(6), 923-943.
Lerner, J., & Tirole, J. (2002). Some Simple Economics of Open Source. The Journal of Industrial Economics, 50(2), 197-234.
Rullani, F., & Haefliger, S. (2013). The periphery on stage: The intra-organizational dynamics in online communities of creation. Research Policy, 42(4), 941-953.
Stewart, K. J., & Gosain, S. (2006). The impact of ideology on effectiveness in open source software development teams. MIS Quarterly, 30(2), 291-314.
Von Hippel, E., & Von Krogh, G. (2003). Open source software and the 'private-collective' innovation model: Issues for organization science. Organization science, 14(2), 209-223.
Von Krogh, G., Spaeth, S., & Lakhani, K. R. (2003). Community, joining, and specialization in open source software innovation: A case study. Research Policy, 32(7), 1217-1241.
Yoo, Y., Boland, R. J., Lyytinen, K., & Majchrzak, A. (2012). Organizing for Innovation in the Digitized World. Organization Science, 23(5), 1398-1408.

Motivation to Innovate:
Baldwin, C. Y., & Clark, K. B. (2006). The Architecture of participation: Does code architecture mitigate free riding in the open source development model? Management Science, 52(7), 1116-1127.
Hertel, G., Niedner, S., & Herrmann, S. (2003). Motivation of software developers in open source projects: An internet-based survey of contributors to the Linux kernel. Research Policy, 32(7), 1159-1177.
Roberts, J. A., Hann, I.-H., & Slaughter, S. A. (2006). Understanding the motivations, participation, and performance of open source software developers: A longitudinal study of the Apache projects. Management Science, 52(7), 984-999.
Von Krogh, G., Haefliger, S., Spaeth, S., & Wallin, M. W. (2012). Carrots and rainbows: Motivation and social practice in open source software development. MIS Quarterly, 36(2), 649-676.

Leadership and Governance:
Gulati, R., Puranam, P., & Tushman, M. (2012). Meta-organization design: Rethinking design in interorganizational and community contexts. Strategic Management Journal, 33(6), 571-586.
O'Mahony, S., & Ferraro, F. (2007). The emergence of governance in an open source community. Academy of Management Journal, 50(5), 1079-1106.
Shah, S. K. (2006). Motivation, governance, and the viability of hybrid forms in open source software development. Management Science, 52(7), 1000-1014.
Singh, P. V., & Phelps, C. (2012). Networks, social influence, and the choice among competing innovations: Insights from open source software licenses. Information Systems Research, 24(3), 539-560.
Stewart, K. J., Ammeter, A. P., & Maruping, L. M. (2006). Impacts of license choice and organizational sponsorship on user interest and development activity in open source software projects. Information Systems Research, 17(2), 126-144.