363-1107-00L  Youth Labor Market Outcomes, Institutions and Governance of Education and Training Systems

SemesterAutumn Semester 2020
LecturersU. Renold, T. Bolli
Periodicityyearly recurring course
Language of instructionEnglish


AbstractFinding and retaining talent for companies is becoming increasingly important nowadays. While Switzerland has a comparatively efficient labor-market-oriented education system, other countries find it more challenging to develop the skills needed by the labor market. We will consider contributions of economics and other social sciences to understanding outcomes of education and training systems.
ObjectiveUsing internationally comparable data, students can measure, compare and assess the human capital performance of education systems.

Students can use case studies to identify and evaluate the different institutional features of labor-market-oriented education systems, and use those features to explain certain outcome effects on the youth labor market.

Students are able to deduce the consequences of countries’ different initial institutional situations, to locate them culturally, and to point out problem-solving measures from the perspective of a company seeking improved skills preparation.
ContentIn the context of digitalization and rapid technological change, finding and retaining talent for companies is becoming increasingly important. While Switzerland has a comparatively efficient labor-market-oriented education system, other countries find it much more challenging to develop the skills needed by the labor market. Without strong education and training systems, it is difficult to secure the volume of labor, quantitatively and qualitatively, that is necessary for prosperity and social development.
The course will take a macro perspective to show how we can measure the performance of different education and training systems. It will also describe the institutional challenges countries face when companies complain that a shortage of skilled professionals is limiting growth. We will consider the contributions of economics and other social sciences to understanding the performance of diverse education and training systems, which we regard as both as economic and institutional phenomena.