064-0016-17L  PhD Colloquium Theory of Information Technology for Architects

Semester Spring Semester 2017
Lecturers L. Hovestadt
Periodicity semester course
Language of instruction English


Abstract Information technology plays an increasingly important role in research. To meet this challenging development, it is not only important to acquire respective skills, but also to consider and understand information technology in what sets it apart from other gestalts of technics (like mechanics, dynamics, or thermodynamics).
Objective The aim of this colloquium is to counter an observable tendency, that proportional to the degree in which students master practical skills in computing, they increasingly submit uncritically, in their understanding and framing of problems, to the dictation of schemata and templates implemented by technical systems.
Content The starting point for this colloquium is to comprehend computing not in terms of skills, but as a literacy which we can experience emerging today. Like in the case of writing as well, computing cannot exhaustively be reduced to either logics, grammar, arithmetics, or analytics. Rather, computation, if comprehended as a literacy, relates to any of the established categories of learning and raises questions of an architectonic kind. This colloquium draws from the principal richness of cultural forms of knowing and learning and thematizes approaches to formulate a theoretical stance on information technology for architects which is driven by and resting on the actual reality of computability today. In this, it is complementary to those theory courses on technology offered by the historical disciplines at ETH.
Prerequisites / Notice To benefit from this course, you should have a practical affinity to technics, as well as an abstract interest in information technology in its comprehensive cultural context.