327-2220-00L  Materials for Energy and Environmental Sustainability

Semester Frühjahrssemester 2015
Dozierende J. VandeVondele, W. Hoffelner, J. Rupp
Periodizität jährlich wiederkehrende Veranstaltung
Lehrsprache Englisch


Kurzbeschreibung Materials for energy and environmental sustainability shows how materials play a critical role in the world's energy demands. The fundamental physics, chemistry and materials science leading e.g. to efficient batteries, fuel cells, solar cells or safe storage of nuclear waste are studied. Materials flows, availability and recycling are assessed for current and emerging technologies.
Lernziel - Understanding of worldwide energy use, current energy use patterns, and challenges posed by renewable energy.
- Economics of material flows, materials availability and life-cycle management
- Electrochemical concepts, redox and defect chemistry, mass transport in devices and their interfaces
- Principles of photovoltaic conversion, types of photovoltaic devices, approaches for natural and artificial photosynthesis
- Materials modeling from DFT to multiscale.
- Nuclear energy generation, radiation induced materials evolution and damage,
 resistance to extreme temperature and chemical environments, waste management and disposal, material demands for fusion.
Inhalt Intro: The global energy landscape, climate change and sustainability (renewables), economics, material flows, stationary vs mobile and transportation
Nonrenewables: energy sources (petroleum, coal, gas, gas hydrates) and energy use in industry
Electrochemical: generation (fuel cell systems and materials), storage (batteries), including defect chemistry
Efficiency: Energy efficiency, materials availability, recycling and life-cycle assessment
Solar: photovoltaics (PV), solar thermal (CSP), direct fuel (photosynthesis), wind and water
Modeling: Atomistic Modeling of energy materials
Nuclear: materials for Fission and Fusion
Literatur Fundamentals of Materials for Energy and Environmental Sustainability, Edited by David S. Ginley and David Cahen, Cambridge University Press.