263-4640-00L  Network Security

Semester Autumn Semester 2016
Lecturers A. Perrig, T. P. Dübendorfer, S. Frei
Periodicity yearly course
Language of instruction English


Abstract This lecture discusses fundamental concepts and technologies in the area of network security. Several case studies illustrate the dark side of the Internet and explain how to protect against such threats. A hands-on computer lab that accompanies the lecture gives a deep dive on firewalls, penetration testing and intrusion detection.
Objective •Students are aware of current threats that Internet services and networked devices face and can explain appropriate countermeasures.
•Students can identify and assess known vulnerabilities in a software system that is connected to the Internet.
•Students know fundamental network security concepts.
•Students have an in-depth understanding of important security technologies.
•Students know how to configure a real firewall and know some penetration testing tools from their own experience.
Content Risk management and the vulnerability lifecycle of software and networked services are discussed. Threats like denial of service, spam, worms, and viruses are studied in-depth. Fundamental security related concepts like identity, availability, authentication and secure channels are introduced. State of the art technologies like secure shell, network and transport layer security, intrusion detection and prevention systems, cross-site scripting, secure implementation techniques and more for securing the Internet and web applications are presented. Several case studies illustrate the dark side of the Internet and explain how to protect against current threats. A hands-on computer lab that accompanies the lecture gives a deep dive on firewalls, penetration testing and intrusion detection.
This lecture is intended for students with an interest in securing Internet services and networked devices. Students are assumed to have knowledge in networking as taught in the Communication Networks lecture.
Prerequisites / Notice Knowldedge in computer networking and Internet protocols (e.g. course Communication Networks (D-ITET) or Operating Systems and Networks (D-INFK).

Due to recent changes in the Swiss law, ETH requires each student of this course to sign a written declaration that he/she will not use the information given in this for illegal purposes. This declaration will have to be signed and submitted no later than at the beginning of the second lesson.