263-4640-00L  Network Security

Semester Autumn Semester 2017
Lecturers A. Perrig, S. Frei
Periodicity yearly course
Language of instruction English


Abstract Some of today's most damaging attacks on computer systems involve
exploitation of network infrastructure, either as the target of attack
or as a vehicle to attack end systems. This course provides an
in-depth study of network attack techniques and methods to defend
against them.
Objective - Students are familiar with fundamental network security concepts.
- Students can assess current threats that Internet services and networked devices face, and can evaluate appropriate countermeasures.
- Students can identify and assess known vulnerabilities in a software system that is connected to the Internet (through analysis and penetration testing tools).
- Students have an in-depth understanding of a range of important security technologies.
- Students learn how formal analysis techniques can help in the design of secure networked systems.
Content The course will cover topics spanning five broad themes: (1) network
defense mechanisms such as secure routing protocols, TLS, anonymous
communication systems, network intrusion detection systems, and
public-key infrastructures; (2) network attacks such as denial of
service (DoS) and distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks; (3)
analysis and inference topics such as network forensics and attack
economics; (4) formal analysis techniques for verifying the security
properties of network architectures; and (5) new technologies related
to next-generation networks.
Prerequisites / Notice This lecture is intended for students with an interest in securing
Internet communication services and network devices. Students are
assumed to have knowledge in networking as taught in a Communication
Networks lecture. The course will involve a course project and some
smaller programming projects as part of the homework. Students are
expected to have basic knowledge in network programming in a
programming language such as C/C++, Go, or Python.

Due to recent changes in the Swiss law, ETH requires each student of
this course to sign a written declaration that he/she will not use the
information given in this for illegal purposes. This declaration will
have to be signed and submitted no later than at the beginning of the
second lesson.