From 2 November 2020, the autumn semester 2020 will take place online. Exceptions: Courses that can only be carried out with on-site presence.
Please note the information provided by the lecturers via e-mail.

Search result: Catalogue data in Autumn Semester 2014

Biomedical Engineering Master Information
Master Programme According to Programme Regulations 2013
Track Courses
Medical Physics
Track Core Courses
During the Master program, a minimum of 12 CP must be obtained from track core courses.
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
227-0385-00LBiomedical Imaging Information W4 credits3GS. Kozerke, U. Moser, M. Rudin
AbstractIntroduction and analysis of medical imaging technology including X-ray procedures, computed tomography, nuclear imaging techniques using single photon and positron emission tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound imaging techniques.
ObjectiveUnderstand the physical and technical principles underlying X-ray imaging, computed tomography, single photon and positron emission tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasound and Doppler imaging techniques. Develop the mathematical framework to describe image encoding/decoding, point-spread function/modular transfer function, signal-to-noise ratio, contrast behavior for each of the methods.
ContentX-ray imaging
Computed tomography
Single photon emission tomography
Positron emission tomography
Magnetic resonance imaging
Ultrasound/Doppler imaging
Lecture notesLecture notes and handouts: Biomedical Imaging
LiteratureIntroduction to Medical Imaging: Physics, Engineering and Clinical Applications by Andrew Webb, Nadine Barrie Smith,
Cambridge University Press
402-0341-00LMedical Physics IW6 credits2V + 1UP. Manser
AbstractIntroduction to the fundamentals of medical radiation physics. Functional chain due to radiation exposure from the primary physical effect to the radiobiological and medically manifest secondary effects. Dosimetric concepts of radiation protection in medicine. Mode of action of radiation sources used in medicine and its illustration by means of Monte Carlo simulations.
ObjectiveUnderstanding the functional chain from primary physical effects of ionizing radiation to clinical radiation effects. Dealing with dose as a quantitative measure of medical exposure. Getting familiar with methods to generate ionizing radiation in medicine and learn how they are applied for medical purposes. Eventually, the lecture aims to show the students that medical physics is a fascinating and evolving discipline where physics can directly be used for the benefits of patients and the society.
ContentThe lecture is covering the basic principles of ionzing radiation and its physical and biological effects. The physical interactions of photons as well as of charged particles will be reviewed and their consequences for medical applications will be discussed. The concept of Monte Carlo simulation will be introduced in the excercises and will help the student to understand the characteristics of ionizing radiation in simple and complex situations. Fundamentals in dosimetry will be provided in order to understand the physical and biological effects of ionizing radiation. Deterministic as well as stochastic effects will be discussed and fundamental knowledge about radiation protection will be provided. In the second part of the lecture series, we will cover the generation of ionizing radiation. By this means, the x-ray tube, the clinical linear accelarator, and different radioactive sources in radiology, radiotherapy and nuclear medicine will be addressed. Applications in radiolgoy, nuclear medicine and radiotherapy will be described with a special focus on the physics underlying these applications.
Lecture notesA script will be provided.
402-0345-00LIntroduction to Medical Physics
Does not take place this semester.
W4 credits2VA. J. Lomax
AbstractMedical physics is a fascinating and worthwhile scientific discipline, providing many professional opportunities to apply physics to the care of patients, either in the clinic or in industry. It is also an area allowing for exciting, interesting and fulfilling areas of research.
ObjectiveIt is the aim of this course to give bachelor and master level students an insight into the wide spectrum of medical applications of physics, and to provide some insight into the work of the medical physicist in clinics, industry and research.
ContentThe lecture series will begin with a short historical overview of medical physics and an overview of the lecture series (lecture 1). This will be followed by two lectures on the physics of medical imaging. Medical imaging is one of the most important areas of preventative medicine and diagnostics, and in these two lectures, we will summarise the physics aspects of all the most important medical imaging modalities (X-ray, nuclear medicine, CT, MRI, Ultrasound imaging etc.). With lectures 4 and 5, we will move onto one of the other major areas of physics applied to medicine, radiotherapy. As the name implies, this is a physics 'heavy' discipline, being dependent as it is on both accelerator and particle physics. However, what is less well known is that this is also the second most successfu
l treatment of cancer after surgery and a great success story for the application of physics to medicine. In lectures 6 and 7 will then move on to a very different area, that of bio-photonics and bio-physics. Here we will look into the applications of lasers in medicine, from therapy to their use in particle acceleration for medical applications, as well as a variety of optical techniques for studying biological tissues, cells and structures.
In the second half of the lecture series (lectures 8-13) the style changes somewhat, and we will concentrate on professional aspects of medical physics and the role of the medical physicist in various professional scenarios. As such, lectures 8-11 will cover the role of the clinical medical physicist in diagnostic radiology, MRI, nuclear medicine and radiotherapy, whilst the last two lectures will concentrate on their role in industry and research. For many of this second set of lectures, external experts in the various areas will be invited in order to give the student the best possible insight into the life of a professional medical physicist.
227-0943-00LRadiobiologyW2 credits2VM. Pruschy
AbstractThe purpose of this course is to impart basic knowledge in radiobiology in order to handle ionizing rays and to provide a basis for predicting the radiation risk.
Objective
ContentEinführung in die Strahlenbiologie ionisierender Strahlen: Allgemeine Grundlagen und Begriffsbestimmungen; Mechanismen der biologischen Strahlenwirkung; Strahlenwirkung auf Zellen, Gewebe und Organe; Modifikation der biologischen Strahlenwirkung; Strahlenzytogenetik: Chromosomenveränderungen, DNA-Defekte, Reparaturprozesse; Molekulare Strahlenbiologie: Bedeutung inter- und intrazellulärer Signalübermittlungsprozesse, Apoptose, Zellzyklus-Checkpoints; Strahlenrisiko: Strahlensyndrome, Krebsinduktion, Mutationsauslösung, pränatale Strahlenwirkung; Strahlenbiologische Grundlagen des Strahlenschutzes; Nutzen-Risiko-Abwägungen bei der medizinischen Strahlenanwendung; Prädiktive strahlenbiologische Methoden zur Optimierung der therapeutischen Strahlenanwendung.
Lecture notesBeilagen mit zusammenfassenden Texten, Tabellen, Bild- und Grafikdarstellungen werden abgegeben
LiteratureLiteraturliste wird abgegeben.
Für NDS-Absolventen empfohlen: Hall EJ: Radiobiology for the Radiologist, 5th Edition, Lippincott Williams&Wilkins, ISBN 0-7817-2649-2, 2000
Prerequisites / NoticeThe former number of this course unit is 465-0951-00L.
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