Search result: Catalogue data in Spring Semester 2015

Electrical Engineering and Information Technology Master Information
Major Courses
A total of 42 CP must be achieved form courses during the Master Program. The individual study plan is subject to the tutor's approval.
Electronics and Photonics
Core Subjects
These core subjects are particularly recommended for the field of "Electronics and Photonics".
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
227-0111-00LCommunication Electronics Information W6 credits2V + 2UQ. Huang
AbstractElectronics for communications systems, with emphasis on realization. Low noise amplifiers, modulators and demodulators, transmit amplifiers and oscillators are discussed in the context of wireless communications. Wireless receiver, transmitter and frequency synthesizer will be described. Importance of and trade offs among sensitivity, linearity and selectivity are discussed extensively.
ObjectiveFoundation course for understanding modern electronic circuits for communication applications. We learn how theoretical communications principles are reduced to practice using transistors, switches, inductors, capacitors and resistors. The harsh environment such communication electronics will be exposed to and the resulting requirements on the sensitivity, linearity and selectivity help explain the design trade offs encountered in every circuit block found in a modern transceiver.
ContentAccounting for more than two trillion dollars per year, communications is one of the most important drivers for advanced economies of our time. Wired networks have been a key enabler to the internet age and the proliferation of search engines, social networks and electronic commerce, whereas wireless communications, cellular networks in particular, have liberated people and increased productivity in developed and developing nations alike. Integrated circuits that make such communications devices light weight and affordable have played a key role in the proliferation of communications.
This course introduces our students to the key components that realize the tangible products in electronic form. We begin with an introduction to wireless communications, and describe the harsh environment in which a transceiver has to work reliably. In this context we highlight the importance of sensitivity or low noise, linearity, selectivity, power consumption and cost, that are all vital to a competitive device in such applications.
We shall review bipolar and MOS devices from a designer's prospectives, before discussing basic amplifier structures - common emitter/source, common base/gate configurations, their noise performance and linearity, impedance matching, and many other things one needs to know about a low noise amplifier.
We will discuss modulation, and the mixer that enables its implementation. Noise and linearity form an inseparable part of the discussion of its design, but we also introduce the concept of quadrature demodulator, image rejection, and the effects of mismatch on performance.
When mixers are used as a modulator the signals they receive are usually large and the natural linearity of transistors becomes insufficient. The concept of feedback will be introduced and its function as an improver of linearity studied in detail.
Amplifiers in the transmit path are necessary to boost the power level before the signal leaves an integrated circuit to drive an even more powerful amplifier (PA) off chip. Linearized pre-amplifiers will be studied as part of the transmitter.
A crucial part of a mobile transceiver terminal is the generation of local oscillator signals at the desired frequencies that are required for modulation and demodulation. Oscillators will be studied, starting from stability criteria of an electronic system, then leading to criteria for controlled instability or oscillation. Oscillator design will be discussed in detail, including that of crystal controlled oscillators which provide accurate time base.
An introduction to phase-locked loops will be made, illustrating how it links a variable frequency oscillator to a very stable fixed frequency crystal oscillator, and how phase detector, charge pump and programmable dividers all serve to realize an agile frequency synthesizer that is very stable in each frequency synthesized.
Lecture notesScript with slides and notes is available.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe course Analog Integrated Circuits is recommended as preparation for this course.
227-0146-00LAnalog-to-Digital Converters Information W6 credits2V + 2UQ. Huang, T. Burger
AbstractThis course provides a thorough treatment of integrated data conversion systems from system level specifications and trade-offs, over architecture choice down to circuit implementation.
ObjectiveData conversion systems are substantial sub-parts of many electronic systems, e.g. the audio conversion system of a home-cinema systems or the base-band front-end of a wireless modem. Data conversion systems usually determine the performance of the overall system in terms of dynamic range and linearity. The student will learn to understand the basic principles behind data conversion and be introduced to the different methods and circuit architectures to implement such a conversion. The conversion methods such as successive approximation or algorithmic conversion are explained with their principle of operation accompanied with the appropriate mathematical calculations, including the effects of non-idealties in some cases. After successful completion of the course the student should understand the concept of an ideal ADC, know all major converter architectures, their principle of operation and what governs their performance.
Content- Introduction: information representation and communication; abstraction, categorization and symbolic representation; basic conversion algorithms; data converter application; tradeoffs among key parameters; ADC taxonomy.
- Dual-slope & successive approximation register (SAR) converters: dual slope principle & converter; SAR ADC operating principle; SAR implementation with a capacitive array; range extension with segmented array.
- Algorithmic & pipelined A/D converters: algorithmic conversion principle; sample & hold stage; pipe-lined converter; multiplying DAC; flash sub-ADC and n-bit MDAC; redundancy for correction of non-idealties, error correction.
- Performance metrics and non-linearity: ideal ADC; offset, gain error, differential and integral non-linearities; capacitor mismatch; impact of capacitor mismatch on SAR ADC's performance.
- Flash, folding an interpolating analog-to-digital converters: flash ADC principle, thermometer to binary coding, sparkle correction; limitations of flash converters; the folding principle, residue extraction; folding amplifiers; cascaded folding; interpolation for folding converters; cascaded folding and interpolation.
- Noise in analog-to-digital converters: types of noise; noise calculation in electronic circuit, kT/C-noise, sampled noise; noise analysis in switched-capacitor circuits; aperture time uncertainty and sampling jitter.
- Delta-sigma A/D-converters: linearity and resolution; from delta-modulation to delta-sigma modulation; first-oder delta-sigma modulation, circuit level implementation; clock-jitter & SNR in delta-sigma modulators; second-order delta-sigma modulation, higher-order modulation, design procedure for a single-loop modulator.
- Digital-to-analog converters: introduction; current scaling D/A converter, current steering DAC, calibration for improved performance.
Lecture notesHandouts of the slides will be distributed.
Literature- B. Razavi, Principles of Data Conversion System Design, IEEE Press, 1994
- M. Gustavsson et. al., CMOS Data Converters for Communications, Springer, 2010
- R.J. van de Plassche, CMOS Integrated Analog-to-Digital and Digital-to-Analog Converters, Springer, 2010
Prerequisites / NoticeIt is highly recommended to attend the course "Analog Integrated Circuits" of Prof. Huang as a preparation for this course.
227-0148-00LVLSI III: Test and Fabrication of VLSI Circuits Information W6 credits4GN. Felber, H. Kaeslin
AbstractThis last course in our VLSI series is concerned with the manufacturing of integrated circuits (IC) in CMOS technology, with defects that may occur during the process, and ---above all--- with the methods and tools for detecting design flaws and fabrication defects.
ObjectiveKnow how to apply methods, software tools and equipment for designing testable VLSI circuits, for testing fabricated ICs, and for physical analysis in the occurrence of defective parts. A basic understanding of modern semiconductor technologies.
ContentThis final course in a series of three focusses on manufacturing, testing, physical analysis, and packaging of VLSI circuits. Future prospects of micro- and nanoelectronics are also being discussed. Topics include:
- Effects of fabrication defects.
- Abstraction from physical to transistor- and gate-level fault models.
- Fault grading in the occurrence of large ASICs.
- Generation of efficient test vector sets.
- Enhancement of testability with built-in self test.
- Organisation and application of automated test equipment.
- Physical analysis of devices.
- Packaging problems and solutions.
- Today's nanometer CMOS fabrication processes (HKMG).
- Optical and post optical Photolithography.
- Potential alternatives to CMOS technology and MOSFET devices.
- Evolution paths for design methodology.
- Industrial roadmaps for the future evolution of semiconductor technology (ITRS).

Exercises teach students how to use CAE/CAD software and automated equipment for testing ASICs after fabrication. Students that have submitted a design for manufacturing at the end of the 7th term do so on their own circuits. Physical analysis methods with professional equipment (AFM, DLTS) complement this training.
Lecture notesEnglish lecture notes.

All written documents in English.
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites:
Basics of digital design.

Further details:
http://www.iis.ee.ethz.ch/stud_area/vorlesungen/vlsi3.en.html
227-0159-00LQuantum Transport in Nanoscale Devices Information W6 credits2V + 2UM. Luisier
AbstractThis class offers an introduction into quantum transport theory, a rigorous approach to electron transport at the nanoscale. It covers different topics such as bandstructure, Wave Function and Non-equilibrium Green's Function formalisms, and electron interactions with their environment. Matlab exercises accompany the lectures where students learn how to develop their own transport simulator.
ObjectiveThe continuous scaling of electronic devices has given rise to structures whose dimensions do not exceed a few atomic layers. At this size, electrons do not behave as particle any more, but as propagating waves and the classical representation of electron transport as the sum of drift-diffusion processes fails. The purpose of this class is to explore and understand the displacement of electrons through nanoscale device structures based on state-of-the-art quantum transport methods and to get familiar with the underlying equations by developing his own nanoelectronic device simulator.
ContentThe following topics will be addressed:
- Introduction to quantum transport modeling
- Bandstructure representation and effective mass approximation
- Open vs closed boundary conditions to the Schrödinger equation
- Comparison of the Wave Function and Non-equilibrium Green's Function formalisms as solution to the Schrödinger equation
- Self-consistent Schödinger-Poisson simulations
- Quantum transport simulations of resonant tunneling diodes and quantum well nano-transistors
- Top-of-the-barrier simulation approach to nano-transistor
- Electron interactions with their environment (phonon, roughness, impurity,...)
- Multi-band transport models
Lecture notesLecture slides are distributed every week and can be found at
http://www.iis.ee.ethz.ch/stud_area/vorlesungen/electransport.en.html
LiteratureRecommended textbook: "Electronic Transport in Mesoscopic Systems", Supriyo Datta, Cambridge Studies in Semiconductor Physics and Microelectronic Engineering, 1997
Prerequisites / NoticeBasic knowledge of semiconductor device physics and quantum mechanics
227-0456-00LHigh Frequency and Microwave Electronics I Information
Does not take place this semester.
W6 credits4GC. Bolognesi
AbstractUnderstanding of basic building blocks of microwave electronics technology, with a focus on active semiconductor devices.
ObjectiveUnderstanding the fundamentals of microwave electronics technology, with emphasis on active components.
ContentIntroduction, microstrip transmission lines, matching, semiconductors, pn-junction, noise, PIN-diode and applications, Schottky diodes and detectors, bipolar transistors and heterojunction bipolar transistors, MESFET physics and properties, high-electron mobility transistors, microwave amplifiers.
Lecture notesScript: Mikrowellentechnik and Mikrowellenelektronik, by Werner Bächtold
(In German).
Prerequisites / NoticeThe lectures will be held in English.
227-0198-00LWearable Systems II: Design and Implementation Information W6 credits4GG. Tröster
AbstractConcepts and methods to integrate mobile computers into clothes.
Textile sensors: strain, pressure, temperature, ECG, EMG,..
New substrates (eTextile, Smart Textile), organic material (foils)
Power and Energy in Wearable Systems
Economical conditions
Evaluation of research institutions, projects and proposals.
ObjectiveTo integrate wearable computers also commercially successful in our daily outfit, innovative sensing and communication technologies as well as economical and ethical aspects have to be considered.

The course deals with
> Textile Sensors: strain, pressure, temperature, ECK, EMG, ...
> Packaging: new substrates (eTextiles), organic material (foils)
> Power and energy in mobile systems.
> Privacy and Ethics

Using a business plan we will practice the commercialisation of our 'Wearable Computers'.

Supported by a wiki-tool the course is organized as a seminar, in which the addressed topics are jointly discussed considering the aspect 'Concept of a research proposal'. According to the ETH 'critical thinking initiative' we will analyse and reflect implementation concepts incorporating the social and scientific context. Presentations alternate with workshops and discussions. Instead of an oral examination a thesis in a form of a project proposal can be submitted.

The audience determines the used language (German or English)
ContentTo integrate wearable computers also commercially successful in our daily outfit, innovative sensing and communication technologies as well as economical and ethical aspects have to be considered.

The course deals with
> Textile Sensors: strain, pressure, temperature, ECK, EMG, ...
> Packaging: new substrates (eTextiles), organic material (foils)
> Power and energy in mobile systems.
> Privacy and Ethics

Using a business plan we will practice the commercialisation of our 'Wearable Computers'.

Supported by a wiki-tool the course is organized as a seminar, in which the addressed topics are jointly discussed considering the aspect 'Concept of a research proposal'. According to the ETH 'critical thinking initiative' we will analyse and reflect implementation concepts incorporating the social and scientific context. Presentations alternate with workshops and discussions. Instead of an oral examination a thesis in a form of a project proposal can be submitted.

The audience determines the used language (German or English)
Lecture notesA wiki-tool will be available for the internal communication; that includes lecture notes for all lessons, assignments and solutions.
http://www.ife.ee.ethz.ch/education/wearable_systems_2/
LiteratureWill be provided in the course material
Prerequisites / NoticeSupported by a wiki-tool the course is organized as a seminar, in which the addressed topics are jointly discussed considering the aspect 'Concept of a research proposal'. According to the ETH 'critical thinking initiative' we will analyse and reflect implementation concepts incorporating the social and scientific context. Presentations alternate with workshops and discussions. Instead of an oral examination a thesis in a form of a project proposal can be submitted.

The audience determines the date and the used language (German or English)

No special prerequisites, also not the participation of 'Wearable Systems 1'
151-0172-00LDevices and Systems Information W5 credits4GC. I. Roman, A. Hierlemann
AbstractThe students are introduced to the fundamentals and physics of microelectronic devices as well as to microsystems in general (MEMS). They will be able to apply this knowledge for system research and development and to assess and apply principles, concepts and methods from a broad range of technical and scientific disciplines for innovative products.
ObjectiveThe students are introduced to the fundamentals and physics of microelectronic devices as well as to microsystems in general (MEMS), basic electronic circuits for sensors, RF-MEMS, chemical microsystems, BioMEMS and microfluidics, magnetic sensors and optical devices, and in particular to the concepts of Nanosystems (focus on carbon nanotubes), based on the respective state-of-research in the field. They will be able to apply this knowledge for system research and development and to assess and apply principles, concepts and methods from a broad range of technical and scientific disciplines for innovative products.
ContentIntroduction to semiconductors, MOSFET transistors
Basic electronic circuits for sensors and microsystems
Transducer Fundamentals
Chemical sensors and biosensors, microfluidics and bioMEMS
RF MEMS
Magnetic Sensors, optical Devices
Nanosystem concepts
Lecture noteshandouts
227-0150-00LAdvanced System-on-chip Design: Integrated Parallel Computing Architectures Information W6 credits4GL. Benini
AbstractThe course will cover Digital System-on-Chip architectures: multi-cores, many-cores, GP-GPUs and heterogeneous platforms, with an in-depth view on design tools and methods targeting advanced nanometer-scale technology and system integration options.
ObjectiveTo provide an in-depth understanding of the links and dependencies between architectures and their silicon implementation and to get an
exposure to state-of-the-art methodologies for designing complex integrated systems using advanced technologies. Practical experience will also be gained through projects assigned on specific topics.
ContentThe course will cover Digital System-on-Chip architectures, design tools and methods, with an in-depth view on design challenges related to advanced silicon technology and state-of-the-art system integration options (novel storage options, three-dimensional integration, advanced system packaging). The emphasis will be on programmable parallel architectures, namely, multi and many- cores, GPUs, vector accelerators, heterogeneous platforms, and the complex design choices required to achieve scalability and energy proportionality. The course will cover not only circuit, logic and microarchitecture design, but it will also delve into system design, touching on hardware-software tradeoffs and full-system analysis and optimization taking into account non-functional constraints and quality metrics, such as power consumption, thermal dissipation, reliability and variability.
Lecture notesSlides will be provided to accompany lectures
LiteratureD. Patterson, J. Hennessy, Computer Architecture, Fifth Edition: A Quantitative Approach (The Morgan Kaufmann Series in Computer Architecture and Design), 2011.

D. Patterson, J. Hennessy, Computer Organization and Design, Fifth Edition: The Hardware/Software Interface (The Morgan Kaufmann Series in Computer Architecture and Design), 2013.
Prerequisites / NoticeKnowledge of digital design at the level of "Design of Digital Circuits SS12" is required.

Knowledge of basic VLSI design at the level of "VLSI I: Architectures of VLSI Circuits" is required
Recommended Subjects
These courses are recommended, but you are free to choose courses from any other special field. Please consult your tutor.
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
151-0620-00LEmbedded MEMS Lab Information
Number of participants limited to 15.
W5 credits3PK. Chikkadi, S. Blunier
AbstractPractical course: Students are introduced to the process steps required for the fabrication of MEMS (Micro Electro Mechanical System) and carry out the fabrication and testing steps in the clean rooms themselves. Additionally, they learn the requirements for working in clean rooms. Processing and characterization will be documented and analyzed in a final report.
ObjectiveStudents learn the individual process steps that are required to make a MEMS (Micro Electro Mechanical System). Students carry out the process steps themselves in laboratories and clean rooms. Furthermore, participants become familiar with the special requirements (cleanliness, safety, operation of equipment and handling hazardous chemicals) of working in the clean rooms and laboratories. The entire production, processing, and characterization of the MEMS is documented and evaluated in a final report.
ContentWith guidance from a tutor, the individual silicon microsystem process steps that are required for the fabrication of an accelerometer are carried out:
- Photolithography, dry etching, wet etching, sacrificial layer etching, critical point drying, various cleaning procedures
- Packaging and electrical connection of a MEMS device
- Testing and characterization of the MEMS device
- Written documentation and evaluation of the entire production, processing and characterization
Lecture notesA document containing theory, background and practical course content is distributed in the informational meeting.
LiteratureThe document provides sufficient information for the participants to successfully participate in the course.
Prerequisites / NoticeParticipating students are required to attend all scheduled lectures and meetings of the course.

Participating students are required to provide proof that they have personal accident insurance prior to the start of the laboratory portion of the course.

This master's level course is limited to 15 students per semester for safety and efficiency reasons.
If there are more than 15 students registered, we regret to restrict access to this course by the following rules:

Priority 1: master students of the master's program in "Micro and Nanosystems"

Priority 2: master students of the master's program in "Mechanical Engineering" with a specialization in Microsystems and Nanoscale Engineering (MAVT-tutors Profs Daraio, Dual, Hierold, Koumoutsakos, Nelson, Norris, Park, Poulikakos, Pratsinis, Stemmer), who attended the bachelor course "151-0621-00L Microsystems Technology" successfully.

Priority 3: master students, who attended the bachelor course "151-0621-00L Microsystems Technology" successfully.

Priority 4: all other students (PhD, bachelor, master) with a background in silicon or microsystems process technology.

If there are more students in one of these priority groups than places available, we will decide by drawing lots.
Students will be notified at the first lecture of the course (introductory lecture) as to whether they are able to participate.

The course is offered in autumn and spring semester.
227-0158-00LSemiconductor Transport Theory and Monte Carlo Device Simulation Information W4 credits2V + 1UF. Bufler, A. Schenk
AbstractThe first part deals with semiconductor transport theory including the necessary quantum mechanics.
In the second part, the Boltzmann equation is solved with the stochastic methods of Monte Carlo simulation.
The exercises address also TCAD simulations of MOSFETs. Thus the topics include theoretical physics,
numerics and practical applications.
ObjectiveOn the one hand, the link between microscopic physics and its concrete application in device simulation is established; on the other hand, emphasis is also laid on the presentation of the numerical techniques involved.
ContentQuantum theoretical foundations I (state vectors, Schroedinger and Heisenberg picture). Band structure (Bloch theorem, one dimensional periodic potential, density of states). Pseudopotential theory (crystal symmetries, reciprocal lattice, Brillouin zone).
Semiclassical transport theory (Boltzmann transport equation (BTE), scattering processes, linear transport).<br>
Monte Carlo method (Monte Carlo simulation as solution method of the BTE, algorithm, expectation values).<br>
Implementational aspects of the Monte Carlo algorithm (discretization of the Brillouin zone, self-scattering according to Rees, acceptance- rejection method etc.). Bulk Monte Carlo simulation (velocity-field characteristics, particle generation, energy distributions, transport parameters). Monte Carlo device simulation (ohmic boundary conditions, MOSFET simulation).
Quantum theoretical foundations II (limits of semiclassical transport theory, quantum mechanical derivation of the BTE, Markov-Limes).
Lecture notesLecture notes (in German)
227-0366-00LIntroduction to Computational Electromagnetics Information W6 credits4GC. Hafner, J. Leuthold, J. Smajic
AbstractAn overview over the most prominent methods for the simulation of electromagnetic fields is given This includes domain methods such as finite differences and finite elements, method of moments, and boundary methods. Both time domain and frequency domain techniques are considered.
ObjectiveOverview of numerical methods for the simulation of electromagnetic fields and hands-on experiments with selected methods.
ContentOverview of concepts of the main numerical methods for the simulation of electromagnetic fields: Finite Difference Method, Finite Element Method, Transmission Line Matrix Method, Matrix Methods, Multipole Methods, Image Methods, Method of Moments, Integral Equation Methods, Beam Propagation Method, Mode Matching Technique, Spectral Domain Analysis, Method of Lines. Applications: Problems in electrostatic and magnetostatic, guided waves and free-space propagation problems, antennas, resonators, inhomogeneous transmissionlLines, nanotechnic, optics etc.
Lecture notesDownload from: http://alphard.ethz.ch/hafner/Vorles/lect.htm
Prerequisites / NoticeFirst half of the semester: lectures; second half of the semester: exercises in form of small projects
227-0376-00LReliability of Electronic Equipment and SystemsW4 credits2V + 1UU. Sennhauser, M. Held
AbstractReliability and availability are basic properties for safe and sustainable products in communications, energy and medical technology, air and space applications, and electronics. They are described as stochastic and physical processes and have to be optimized with functionality, environmental impact and life cycle costs in development phase already. The required basics will be taught.
ObjectiveIntroduction to the concepts and methods of systems engineering for the design and production of reliable devices, equipment, and systems.
ContentQuality assurance of technical systems (introduction); introduction to stochastic processes; reliability analysis; design and investigation of fault-tolerant structures; component selection and qualification; maintainability analysis (introduction); software quality; design rules for reliability, maintainability, and software quality; availability analysis (introduction); reliability tests (introduction).
Lecture notesCopies of relevant transparencies and additional tables
LiteratureReliability Engineering, Springer 2004, ISBN 3-540-40287-X
227-0468-00LAnalog Signal Processing and Filtering Information
Suitable for Master Students as well as Doctoral Students.

This course will be offered in Autumn Semester from HS 2015 on.
It won't be offered in Spring 2016 anymore.
W6 credits2V + 2UH. Schmid
AbstractThis lecture provides a wide overview over analogue (mostly integrated) filters (continuous-time and discrete-time), amplifiers, and sigma-delta converters, and gives examples with sensor interfaces and class-D audio drivers. All circuits are treated using a signal-flow view. The lecture is suitable for both analog and digital designers.
ObjectiveThis lecture provides a wide overview over analogue (mostly integrated) filters (continuous-time and discrete-time), amplifiers, and sigma-delta converters, and gives examples with sensor interfaces and class-D audio drivers. All these circuits are treated using a signal-flow view. The lecture is suitable for both analog and digital designers. The way the exam is done allows for the different interests of the two groups.

The learning goal is that the students can apply signal-flow graphs and can understand the signal flow in such circuits and systems (including non-ideal effects) well enough to enable them to gain an understanding of further circuits and systems by themselves.
ContentAt the beginning, signal-flow graphs in general and driving-point signal-flow graphs in particular are introduced. We will use them during the whole term to analyze circuits and understand how signals propagate through them. The theory and CMOS implementation of active Filters is then discussed in detail using the example of Gm-C filters. Theory and implementation of opamps, current conveyors, and inductor simulators follow. The link to the practical design of circuits and systems is done with an overview over different quality measures and figures of merit used in scientific literature and datasheets. Finally, an introduction to switched-capacitor filters and circuits is given, including sensor read-out amplifiers, correlated double sampling, and chopping. These topics form the basis for the longest part of the lecture: the discussion of sigma-delta A/D and D/A converters, which are portrayed as mixed analog-digital (MAD) filters in this lecture.
Lecture notesThe base for these lectures are lecture notes and two or three published scientific papers. From these papers we will together develop the technical content.

Details: http://people.ee.ethz.ch/~hps/asfwiki/

Some material is protected by password; students from ETHZ who are interested can write to haschmid@ethz.ch to ask for the password even if they do not attend the lecture.
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites: Recommended (but not required): Stochastic models and signal processing, Communication Electronics, Analog Integrated Circuits, Transmission Lines and Filters.

Knowledge of the Laplace Transform (transfer functions, poles and zeros, bode diagrams, stability criteria ...) and of the main properties of linear systems is necessary.
227-0659-00LIntegrated Systems Seminar Information W1 credit1SA. Schenk
AbstractIn the "Fachseminar IIS" the students learn to communicate topics, ideas or problems of scientific research by listening to more experienced authors and by presenting scientific work in a conference-like situation for a specific audience.
ObjectiveThe seminar aims at instructing graduate and PhD students in the basics of presentation techniques, i.e. "how to give a professional talk". Attendees have the possibility to become acquainted with a current topic by a literature study, and to present the results thereof in a 20 minutes talk in English. The participation at the seminar gives also an overview on current problems in modern nanoelectronics and bio-electromagnetics.
ContentThe seminar topics' are design of digital integrated circuits, physical characterization in nanoelectronics and bio-electromagnetics Simulation.

The studens learn how to find the right literature for a certain topic quickly, as well as how to prepare a talk for a scientific conference, i.e. presentation techniques.
Lecture notesPresentation material
Literatureto be discussed with the advisor
227-0662-00LOrganic and Nanostructured Optics and Electronics Information W6 credits4GV. Wood
AbstractThis course examines the optical and electronic properties of excitonic materials that can be leveraged to create thin-film light emitting devices and solar cells. Laboratory sessions provide students with experience in synthesis and optical characterization of nanomaterials as well as fabrication and characterization of thin film devices.
ObjectiveGain the knowledge and practical experience to begin research with organic or nanostructured materials and understand the key challenges in this rapidly emerging field.
Content0-Dimensional Excitonic Materials (organic molecules and colloidal quantum dots)

Energy Levels and Excited States (singlet and triplet states, optical absorption and luminescence).

Excitonic and Polaronic Processes (charge transport, Dexter and Förster energy transfer, and exciton diffusion).

Devices (photodetectors, solar cells, and light emitting devices).
LiteratureLecture notes and reading assignments from current literature to be posted on website.
Prerequisites / NoticeCourse grade will be based on a final project.
227-0664-00LTechnology and Policy of Electrical Energy StorageW4 credits2GV. Wood, T. Schmidt
Abstract
ObjectiveThe students will learn of the complexity involved in battery research, design, production, as well as in investment, economics and policy making around batteries. Students from technical disciplines will gain insights into policy, while students from social science backgrounds will gain insights into technology.
ContentWith the global emphasis on decreasing CO2 emissions, achieving fossil fuel independence, and integrating renewables on the electric grid, developing and implementing energy storage solutions for electric mobility and grid stabilization represent a key technology and policy challenge. The class will focus on lithium ion batteries since they are poised to enter a variety of markets where policy decisions will affect their production, adoption, and usage scenarios. The course considers the interplay between technology, economics, and policy.
Lecture notesMaterials will be made available on the website.
LiteratureMaterials will be made available on the website.
Prerequisites / NoticeStrong interest in energy and technology policy.
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