Autumn Semester 2020 takes place in a mixed form of online and classroom teaching.
Please read the published information on the individual courses carefully.

Search result: Catalogue data in Autumn Semester 2016

GESS Science in Perspective Information
Only the topics listed in this paragraph can be chosen as GESS Science in Perspective.
Further below you will find the "type B courses Reflections about subject specific methods and content" as well as the language courses.

6 ECTS need to be acquired during the BA and 2 ECTS during the MA

Students who already took a course within their main study program are NOT allowed to take the course again.
Type A: Enhancement of Reflection Competence
Suitable for all students
Students who already took a course within their main study program are NOT allowed to take the course again.
History
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
851-0549-00LWebClass Introductory Course History of Technology Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 100.

Particularly suitable for students of D-BAUG, D-INFK, D-ITET, D-MATL, D-MAVT.
W3 credits2VG. Hürlimann
AbstractWebClass Introductory Course History of Technology is an introductory course to the history of technology. The students are challenged to discover how technological innovations take place within complex economical, political and cultural contexts. They get introduced into basic theories and practices of the field.
ObjectiveStudents are introduced into how technological innovations take place within complex economical, political and cultural contexts. They get to know basic theories and practices of the field.
ContentWebClass Einführungskurs Technikgeschichte ist eine webgestützte Einführung in die Technikgeschichte. Technikgeschichte untersucht Angebote technischer Entwicklungen, die in bestimmten historischen Kontexten entstanden und von sozialen Gruppen oder ganzen Gesellschaften als Möglichkeit sozialen Wandels wahrgenommen, ausgehandelt und schliesslich genutzt oder vergessen wurden.
Der Onlinekurs wird von zwei obligatorischen Präsenzveranstaltungen begleitet. Die aktive Teilnahme und das erfolgreiche Bearbeiten von Onlineaufgaben werden vorausgesetzt.
Lecture notesInformationen zur Arbeit mit WebClass finden Sie unter https://www.tg.ethz.ch/de/programme/herbstsemester-2016/. Sobald Sie eingeschrieben sind, haben Sie Zugang zum Skript und zu weiterführenden Materialien.
Literaturehttps://www.tg.ethz.ch/de/programme/
Prerequisites / NoticeOnlinekurs kombiniert mit zwei obligatorischen Präsenzveranstaltungen. Einführungssitzung: 26.9.2016, zweite Präsenzsitzung: 14.11.2016. Die aktive Teilnahme und das erfolgreiches Bearbeiten von Onlineaufgaben werden vorausgesetzt.
Die Zahl der Teilnehmenden ist auf 100 beschränkt. Anmeldung: In der Einführungssitzung am 26.9.2016, zudem schriftliche Einschreibung sowohl unter www.einschreibung.ethz.ch wie auch auf dem Olat-Server.
Verspätete Anmeldungen können nicht berücksichtigt werden.

Weitere Informationen unter https://www.tg.ethz.ch/de/programme/
853-0725-00LHistory Part One: Europe (The Cradle of Modernity, Britain ca. 1789-1939) Information W3 credits2VH. Fischer-Tiné
AbstractUsing the concrete example of Britain, the "cradle of modernity", this lecture offers a survey and analysis of the crucial historical transformations that engendered "modernity" in Europe from the late 18th to the mid 20th centuries.
ObjectiveAt the end of this lecture course, students can: (a) highlight the most important changes in the "long nineteenth century" in Europe (b) explain their long-term effects; and (c) relate these changes to global developments.
ContentThe thematic foci include: the economic and social consequences of the industrial revolution, the genesis of political ideologies and social movements, shifts in gender roles, colonialism and imperialism, as well as the emergence of consumerism and a "leisure society."
Lecture notesPower Point Slides and sources will be made available at POLYBOX in the course of the semester.
LiteratureMandatory and further reading will be listed on course plan that is made available before the first session.
851-0551-03LPostal Knowledge and the History of Digital Societies
Particularly suitable for students of D-ARCH, D-BAUG, D-HEST, D-INFK, D-ITET, D-MAVT
W3 credits2SD. F. Zetti
AbstractIn the second half of the 20th century, postal services have dramatically changed. Communication today is computerbased. The lecture offers problem oriented insights into this sociotechnical process of translation.
ObjectiveStudents become familiar with the mutual interdependence of social and technological change that characterises the history of computing and communication.
ContentDie Palette postalischer Produkte, Dienstleistungen und Personalien ist spannend und vielfältig. (Liebes-)Briefe und Geldsendungen, Boten und Anrufer, Geheimnisse und Telefonbücher, analoge Vermittlungen und digitale Übertragungen - auf der Basis von Forschungsliteratur und Archivquellen werden solche Objekte, Figuren und Dienste auf ihre kultur-, technik- und wirtschaftshistorische Dimensionen hin befragt. Der behandelte Zeitraum umfasst das 19. und 20. Jahrhundert, inhaltlich liegt ein Schwerpunkt auf den Jahren ab 1950. In jenen Jahrzehnten wurden der Verkehr und die Korrespondenzen der Post mit den Anforderungen rechnergestützter Verständigung kompatibel. Die Vorlesung bietet einen problemorientierten Einblick in diesen soziotechnischen Übersetzungsprozess.
851-0101-18L"Bollywood and Beyond" - A Cultural History of Indian Cinema in the 20th CenturyW3 credits2VH. Fischer-Tiné
AbstractThe Indian film industry has been around for 100 years and is one of the richest and miost variegated of the world. The lecture reconstructs the historical development of Indian cinema and uses it as a lens through which cultural, social and political change in the subcontinent can be explored.
ObjectiveThe objectives of this course are three-fold. For one, the participants shall learn to question aesthetic cetainties and received modes of perception of cinematographic art. Secondly they will be acquainted with the huge potential of films as a historical source to grasp processes of social and cultural change. Besides, the reconstruction of the international career of a specific variety of art and entertainment will also raise important questions of cultural globalisation and consumerism. As a side-effect, a sit were, the students will will also be provided with important insights into the chequered history of the Indian subcontinent in during the course of the 20th century.
LiteratureZur Einführung:

DWYER, Rachel, 'Bollywood's India: Hindi Cinema as a Guide to Modern India', Asian Affairs, 41 (3), 2010, pp. 381-98.

VIRDIK, Jyotika, The Cinematic Imagination: Indian Popular Film as Social History, New Brunswick, NJ and London: Rutgers University Press, 2003.
Prerequisites / NoticeA detailed course description and session plan will be available from 15 Sept 2013 onwards at http://www.gmw.ethz.ch/education
851-0512-05LDevelopment Cooperation from a Biographical Point of ViewW3 credits2UG. Spuhler
AbstractThe Archives of Contemporary History provide 75 video interviews with contemporary witnesses who report on their missions abroad for swiss humanitarian aid and development cooperation. Based on selected interviews the motives of their commitment and the experience in a foreign country are examined.
ObjectiveThe course provides basic knowledge about the beginnings of modern development aid and its increasing professionalism. It aims for a critical and historically informed reflection on the transfer of knowledge and technology between the first and the third world. Furthermore it sharpens the critical awareness of the possibilities and limitations of retrospective accounts of eyewitnesses.
LiteratureGregor Spuhler / Lea Ingber / Sonja Vogelsang: Auslandhilfe als biografische Erfahrung. In: Handlungsfeld Entwicklung. Schweizer Erwartungen und Erfahrungen in der Geschichte der Entwicklungsarbeit (Itinera 35). Hg.: Sara Elmer et al., Basel 2014, S. 253-279.
Thomas Gull / Dominik Schnetzer: Die andere Seite der Welt. Was Schweizerinnen und Schweizer im humanitären Einsatz erlebt haben, Baden 2011.
851-0101-53LCollections in Context: What Do Historians and Scientists Learn from Butterflies, Stones, and Bones?
Particularly suitable for students of D-BIOL, D-BSSE, D-USYS
W3 credits2SB. Schär, M. Greeff
AbstractZurich holds huge scientific collections. They contain objects from around the world, some of them dating back to the 18th century. This interdisciplinary seminar combines perspectives from the history of science and from current scientific disciplines. What do these objects tell us about Zurich's place in the global history of science? What potentials do old collections hold for scientists today?
ObjectiveThe aim of this seminar is threefold: Firstly, students will become familiarised with historiographical approaches to scientific collections. Among them are constructivist approaches that seek to understand scientific knowledge not primarily as a system of objective truths, but rather as an outcome of human 'constructions'. Other approaches deal with the problem of how scientific objects are related to systems of power and oppression, namely in the case of objects collected during the time of european colonialism overseas. Secondly, students will become familiarized with how old collections can yeald new insights for current scientists working, e.g., on questions of ecology. Thirdly, the seminar shall serve as a plattform to discuss ways of dialogue and possible collaboration between these different approaches.

Students will be expected to read theoretical texts and case studies during semester, participate in discussions with external experts (historians, curators, and scientists), and to write a summarizing essay at the end of the term.
851-0535-09LRegional Politics of the Arabian PeninsulaW2 credits2KE. Manea
AbstractThe course explores the complex nature of politics and history of the Arabian Peninsula. It takes a closer look at the political systems of several countries of the Arabian Peninsula, especially Yemen, Saudi Arabia and Oman and Bahrain.
ObjectiveTo highlight how the politics of the Arabian Peninsula is a product of two spheres: politics within states and politics between states.

Introduce the Arabian Peninsula as a political unit, but not a homogeneous one

An overview of the type of political systems prevalent in the region,
religious Denominations, sectarian rivalry, and how this shape its regional relations
ContentThe neighbouring states of the Arabian Peninsula - especially Saudi Arabia, Oman and Yemen - make for strange bedfellows. They are governed by different systems with different results, calling into question how their internal policies affect regional relations and vice versa. Saudi Arabia is a monarchy, a prosperous, religious and restrictive state increasingly facing problems of social/politica unrest. Oman is a small, thriving, stable sultanate, modernised and moderate but tightly controlled; and the republic of Yemen, which has the region's poorest economy, has still not shrugged off the legacy of its turbulent modern history. Each state adheres to a different Islamic sect, moreover, and though their populations are overwhelmingly Arab, differing tribal structures result in widely variant effects on the political process in their respective systems. Each state has also had extensive historical relationships with the Ottoman and British empires, the US and Russia, and these too have coloured regional relations. Recent events like the terrorist attacks of 11 September 2001, the American-led invasion of Iraq and the Arab uprisings of 2011 have also influenced these states' internal policy decisions, further affecting their dealings with one another and at with the world at large. This course examines each country in detail, from state formation to current affairs and from local to international government.
051-0311-00LHistory of Art and Architecture III Information W3 credits2VL. Stalder
AbstractThe two-semester course offers an introduction to the history and theory of architecture from the industrial revolution up to now. Based on current questions a variety of case studies will be discussed.
ObjectiveThe aim is to give an overview on crucial events, works of art, buildings and theories since the beginning of the 19th century up to today. The course should enhance the comprehension of historical and theoretical issues, and allow the students to localize their own practice within a broader historical context.
ContentThe subject of this lecture course is the history and theory of architecture since the beginning of the 19th century up to now. It examines the architectural answers to the changing technical inventions and social practices. Consequently, the focus will be less on individual architects or buildings than on various themes that determined the architecture of the period.
Lecture noteshttp://www.stalder.arch.ethz.ch/courses
051-0363-00LHistory of Urban Design I Information W2 credits2GV. Magnago Lampugnani
AbstractThe lecture covers the time from the beginning of urban culture until the mid 19th century. With selected examples it emphasizes on the historical plannings and methods of European cities. Each specific urban development will be presented within a broader context.
ObjectiveThis course analyzes the history of urban architecture primarily in its existing three dimensional form as a complex human artefact. It also explores the inspirations that prompted the creation of this artefact: philosophical and religious concepts, social conditions, property relationships and the mechanisms that exploit the economics of real estate and the influence of building technology. Intellectual, literary or artistic modes of thought will also be assessed with regard to their impact on urban development. Urbanism has its own distinctive approach as a discipline, but it is also clearly responsive to the influence of related disciplines. Study is made of actual cities and urban expansion plans which are in the process of implementation, as well as unrealized projects and visions of the future. These projects sometimes illustrate ways of thinking that are equal to, or clearer than, actual urban situations.
ContentIn the first semester an introduction to the discipline and the methods are given along the thematic issues from the beginning of urban culture until the mid-19th century.

01. Introduction to the discipline and method: The history of urban design as a historical project

02. Athens and Rome in the ancient world: Myth, selfportrayal and speculation

03. From the spirit of equality to the colonial module: Greek and Roman City foundings

04. From the urban ideal to new cities in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance

05. Baroque strategies: The new organisation of Rome under Sixtus V, the production of Versailles under Louis XIV and the invention of St. Petersburg

06. The city between Absolutism and Enlightment: baroque defence-designs, the European colonization of the American continent and the reconstruction of Lisbon

07. Ideology and speculation after the Glorious Revolution: landscapegardens and urban figurations in England from 1650-1850

08. Between modernization, Grandeur and repression: Embellishment in Paris from 1750-1830

09. The construction of the bourgeois city: Georges-Eugène Haussmann transforms Paris into the capital of the 19th century

10. Architectural insertion and plan for the expansion of the city: From the Berlin of Karl Friedrich Schinkel to James Hobrecht

11. Neoabsolute power, bourgeois self-confidence and Marxian Idealism: The Viennese Ringstrasse and Ildefonso Cerdas Ensanche for Barcelona
Lecture notesThe lectures are accompagnied by a script (two semesters of the bachelor studies), that can be purchased at the chair for the history of urban design (HIL D 75.2) at the price of CHF 30,-. The script serves as an auxiliary means to the attended lecture compiling the most important illustrations showed and the names and dates of the buildings and its builders along with a short introductory note.
LiteratureFurther recommended literature to consult is listet within the script.
Prerequisites / NoticeHistory of Urban Design from antiquity to the 19th century
701-0791-00LEnvironmental History - Introduction and Overview Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 100.
W2 credits2VD. Speich Chassé
AbstractOur society faces a serious ecological crisis. Of what historical dimension is this crisis? How have human societies already in earlier times changed their environment, and, consequently, perhaps also ours? What were the main ecological challenges for societies and how did they change over time? And how did societies adapt to changing environmental conditions?
ObjectiveIntroduction into environmental history; survey of long-term development of human-nature-interrelations; discussion of selected problems. Improved ability to assess current problems from a historical perspective and to critically interrogate one's own standpoint.
Lecture notesCourse material is provided on OLAT.
LiteratureMcNeill, John R. 2000. Something new under the sun: An environmental history of the twentieth-century world, New York: Norton.

Uekötter, Frank (Ed.) 2010. The turning points of environmental history, Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press.

Winiwarter, Verena und Martin Knoll 2007. Umweltgeschichte: Eine Einführung, Köln: Böhlau.
Prerequisites / NoticeStudents are asked to write an exam during the second last session (11.12.2015).
063-0366-00LThe Architecture of the City from Modernity to Today Information W2 credits2VV. Magnago Lampugnani
AbstractThe lecture covers the time of the 20th century and describes with theories, projects and implemented plannings the history of the modern city. The lectures emphasizes on the historical plannings and methods and presents each specific urban development within a broader context.
ObjectiveThis course analyzes the history of urban architecture primarily in its existing three dimensional form as a complex human artefact. It also explores the inspirations that prompted the creation of this artefact: philosophical and religious concepts, social conditions, property relationships and the mechanisms that exploit the economics of real estate and the influence of building technology. Intellectual, literary or artistic modes of thought will also be assessed with regard to their impact on urban development. Urbanism has its own distinctive approach as a discipline, but it is also clearly responsive to the influence of related disciplines. Study is made of actual cities and urban expansion plans which are in the process of implementation, as well as unrealized projects and visions of the future. These projects sometimes illustrate ways of thinking that are equal to, or clearer than, actual urban situations.
ContentThe lecture which will be hold only in one semester includes the developments of the 20th century

1. Le Corbusier: theories, visions and clearcuts in the name oft he autorité

2. The United States in the Jazz Age: Between Metropolis of Tomorrow and Broadacre City

3. Italy in the Fascist Era: Monumental ensembles and new town between assiduousness of modernization and obsession of representation

4. Urban design under totalitarian regimes: The architects of the "Tausendjährige Reich" and the "engineers of luck" of the Soviet Union of Stalin

5. Coming to terms with the past and the Cold War: Reconstruction in the two German states

6. The myth of the human scale: the 1950s in Spain, Great Britain, Scandinavia and Italy

7. Postwar Experiments: Rationalistic classicism in France

8. Two new towns in the 20th century: Chandigarh and Brasilia

9. Fictions and visions: The international utopia of the city

10. The second conquest of the North American territorium: The automobile and the city in the USA

11. Analysis, analogy and renewal: The adventure of the typological city
Lecture notesTo each lecture an overview is listet within a script, that can be purchased at the chair for the history of urban design (HIL D 75.2) at the price of CHF 25,-. The script serves as an auxiliary means to the attended lecture compiling the most important illustrations showed and the names and dates of the buildings and its builders along with a short introductory note.
Aside this script the chair offers the ‚Quellentextbände' (sourcetexts) which help to extend the knowledge of theoretical discourses in the field of urban design. For the master program the institute offers one volume of texts at the price of CHF 5,-. The script is in German, the ‚Quellentextbände’ are reprinted in their original languages.
LiteratureFurther recommended literature to consult is listet within the script.
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