Search result: Catalogue data in Autumn Semester 2016

Computational Science and Engineering Master Information
Fields of Specialization
Fluid Dynamics
One of the course units
151-0103-00L Fluid Dynamics II
151-0109-00L Turbulent Flows
is compulsory. Students able to follow courses in German are advised to choose 151-0103-00L Fluid Dynamics II.
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
151-0103-00LFluid Dynamics IIO3 credits2V + 1UP. Jenny
AbstractTwo-dimensional irrotational (potential) flows: stream function and potential, singularity method, unsteady flow, aerodynamic concepts.
Vorticity dynamics: vorticity and circulation, vorticity equation, vortex theorems of Helmholtz and Kelvin.
Compressible flows: isentropic flow along stream tube, normal and oblique shocks, Laval nozzle, Prandtl-Meyer expansion, viscous effects.
ObjectiveExpand basic knowledge of fluid dynamics.
Concepts, phenomena and quantitative description of irrotational (potential), rotational, and one-dimensional compressible flows.
ContentTwo-dimensional irrotational (potential) flows: stream function and potential, complex notation, singularity method, unsteady flow, aerodynamic concepts.
Vorticity dynamics: vorticity and circulation, vorticity equation, vortex theorems of Helmholtz and Kelvin.
Compressible flows: isentropic flow along stream tube, normal and oblique shocks, Laval nozzle, Prandtl-Meyer expansion, viscous effects.
Lecture notesLecture notes are available (in German).
(See also info on literature below.)
LiteratureRelevant chapters (corresponding to lecture notes) from the textbook

P.K. Kundu, I.M. Cohen, D.R. Dowling: Fluid Mechanics, Academic Press, 5th ed., 2011 (includes a free copy of the DVD "Multimedia Fluid Mechanics")

P.K. Kundu, I.M. Cohen, D.R. Dowling: Fluid Mechanics, Academic Press, 6th ed., 2015 (does NOT include a free copy of the DVD "Multimedia Fluid Mechanics")
Prerequisites / NoticeAnalysis I/II, Knowledge of Fluid Dynamics I, thermodynamics of ideal gas
151-0109-00LTurbulent FlowsW4 credits2V + 1UP. Jenny
AbstractContents
- Laminar and turbulent flows, instability and origin of turbulence - Statistical description: averaging, turbulent energy, dissipation, closure problem - Scalings. Homogeneous isotropic turbulence, correlations, Fourier representation, energy spectrum - Free turbulence: wake, jet, mixing layer - Wall turbulence: Channel and boundary layer - Computation and modelling of turbulent flows
ObjectiveBasic physical phenomena of turbulent flows, quantitative and statistical description, basic and averaged equations, principles of turbulent flow computation and elements of turbulence modelling
Content- Properties of laminar, transitional and turbulent flows.
- Origin and control of turbulence. Instability and transition.
- Statistical description, averaging, equations for mean and fluctuating quantities, closure problem.
- Scalings, homogeneous isotropic turbulence, energy spectrum.
- Turbulent free shear flows. Jet, wake, mixing layer.
- Wall-bounded turbulent flows.
- Turbulent flow computation and modeling.
Lecture notesLecture notes are available
LiteratureS.B. Pope, Turbulent Flows, Cambridge University Press, 2000
151-0182-00LFundamentals of CFD MethodsW+4 credits3GA. Haselbacher
AbstractThis course is focused on providing students with the knowledge and understanding required to develop simple computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes to solve the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations and to critically assess the results produced by CFD codes. As part of the course, students will write their own codes and verify and validate them systematically.
Objective1. Students know and understand basic numerical methods used in CFD in terms of accuracy and stability.
2. Students have a basic understanding of a typical simple CFD code.
3. Students understand how to assess the numerical and physical accuracy of CFD results.
Content1. Governing and model equations. Brief review of equations and properties
2. Overview of basic concepts: Overview of discretization process and its consequences
3. Overview of numerical methods: Finite-difference and finite-volume methods
4. Analysis of spatially discrete equations: Consistency, accuracy, stability, convergence of semi-discrete methods
5. Time-integration methods: LMS and RK methods, consistency, accuracy, stability, convergence
6. Analysis of fully discrete equations: Consistency, accuracy, stability, convergence of fully discrete methods
7. Solution of one-dimensional advection equation: Motivation for and consequences of upwinding, Godunov's theorem, TVD methods, DRP methods
8. Solution of two-dimensional advection equation: Dimension-by-dimension methods, dimensional splitting, multidimensional methods
9. Solution of one- and two-dimensional diffusion equations: Implicit methods, ADI methods
10. Solution of one-dimensional advection-diffusion equation: Numerical vs physical viscosity, boundary layers, non-uniform grids
11. Solution of incompressible Navier-Stokes equations: Incompressibility constraint and consequences, fractional-step and pressure-correction methods
12. Solution of incompressible Navier-Stokes equations on unstructured grids
Lecture notesThe course is based mostly on notes developed by the instructor.
LiteratureLiterature: There is no required textbook. Suggested references are:
1. H.K. Versteeg and W. Malalasekera, An Introduction to Computational Fluid Dynamics, 2nd ed., Pearson Prentice Hall, 2007
2. R.H. Pletcher, J.C. Tannehill, and D. Anderson, Computational Fluid Mechanics and Heat Transfer, 3rd ed., Taylor & Francis, 2011
Prerequisites / NoticePrior knowledge of fluid dynamics, applied mathematics, basic numerical methods, and programming in Fortran and/or C++ (knowledge of MATLAB is *not* sufficient).
151-0105-00LQuantitative Flow VisualizationW4 credits2V + 1UT. Rösgen
AbstractThe course provides an introduction to digital image analysis in modern flow diagnostics. Different techniques which are discussed include image velocimetry, laser induced fluorescence, liquid crystal thermography and interferometry. The physical foundations and measurement configurations are explained. Image analysis algorithms are presented in detail and programmed during the exercises.
ObjectiveIntroduction to modern imaging techniques and post processing algorithms with special emphasis on flow analysis and visualization.
Understanding of hardware and software requirements and solutions.
Development of basic programming skills for (generic) imaging applications.
ContentFundamentals of optics, flow visualization and electronic image acquisition.
Frequently used mage processing techniques (filtering, correlation processing, FFTs, color space transforms).
Image Velocimetry (tracking, pattern matching, Doppler imaging).
Surface pressure and temperature measurements (fluorescent paints, liquid crystal imaging, infrared thermography).
Laser induced fluorescence.
(Digital) Schlieren techniques, phase contrast imaging, interferometry, phase unwrapping.
Wall shear and heat transfer measurements.
Pattern recognition and feature extraction, proper orthogonal decomposition.
Lecture notesavailable
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites: Fluiddynamics I, Numerical Mathematics, programming skills.
Language: German on request.
151-0213-00LFluid Dynamics with the Lattice Boltzmann MethodW4 credits3GI. Karlin
AbstractThe course provides an introduction to theoretical foundations and practical usage of the Lattice Boltzmann Method for fluid dynamics simulations.
ObjectiveMethods like molecular dynamics, DSMC, lattice Boltzmann etc are being increasingly used by engineers all over and these methods require knowledge of kinetic theory and statistical mechanics which are traditionally not taught at engineering departments. The goal of this course is to give an introduction to ideas of kinetic theory and non-equilibrium thermodynamics with a focus on developing simulation algorithms and their realizations.

During the course, students will be able to develop a lattice Boltzmann code on their own. Practical issues about implementation and performance on parallel machines will be demonstrated hands on.

Central element of the course is the completion of a lattice Boltzmann code (using the framework specifically designed for this course).

The course will also include a review of topics of current interest in various fields of fluid dynamics, such as multiphase flows, reactive flows, microflows among others.

Optionally, we offer an opportunity to complete a project of student's choice as an alternative to the oral exam. Samples of projects completed by previous students will be made available.
ContentThe course builds upon three parts:
I Elementary kinetic theory and lattice Boltzmann simulations introduced on simple examples.
II Theoretical basis of statistical mechanics and kinetic equations.
III Lattice Boltzmann method for real-world applications.

The content of the course includes:

1. Background: Elements of statistical mechanics and kinetic theory:
Particle's distribution function, Liouville equation, entropy, ensembles; Kinetic theory: Boltzmann equation for rarefied gas, H-theorem, hydrodynamic limit and derivation of Navier-Stokes equations, Chapman-Enskog method, Grad method, boundary conditions; mean-field interactions, Vlasov equation;
Kinetic models: BGK model, generalized BGK model for mixtures, chemical reactions and other fluids.

2. Basics of the Lattice Boltzmann Method and Simulations:
Minimal kinetic models: lattice Boltzmann method for single-component fluid, discretization of velocity space, time-space discretization, boundary conditions, forcing, thermal models, mixtures.

3. Hands on:
Development of the basic lattice Boltzmann code and its validation on standard benchmarks (Taylor-Green vortex, lid-driven cavity flow etc).

4. Practical issues of LBM for fluid dynamics simulations:
Lattice Boltzmann simulations of turbulent flows;
numerical stability and accuracy.

5. Microflow:
Rarefaction effects in moderately dilute gases; Boundary conditions, exact solutions to Couette and Poiseuille flows; micro-channel simulations.

6. Advanced lattice Boltzmann methods:
Entropic lattice Boltzmann scheme, subgrid simulations at high Reynolds numbers; Boundary conditions for complex geometries.

7. Introduction to LB models beyond hydrodynamics:
Relativistic fluid dynamics; flows with phase transitions.
Lecture notesLecture notes on the theoretical parts of the course will be made available.
Selected original and review papers are provided for some of the lectures on advanced topics.
Handouts and basic code framework for implementation of the lattice Boltzmann models will be provided.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe course addresses mainly graduate students (MSc/Ph D) but BSc students can also attend.
151-0207-00LTheory and Modeling of Reactive FlowsW4 credits3GC. E. Frouzakis, I. Mantzaras
AbstractThe course first reviews the governing equations and combustion chemistry, setting the ground for the analysis of homogeneous gas-phase mixtures, laminar diffusion and premixed flames. Catalytic combustion and its coupling with homogeneous combustion are dealt in detail, and turbulent combustion modeling approaches are presented. Available numerical codes will be used for modeling.
ObjectiveTheory of combustion with numerical applications
ContentThe analysis of realistic reactive flow systems necessitates the use of detailed computer models that can be constructed starting from first principles i.e. thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, chemical kinetics, and heat
and mass transport. In this course, the focus will be on combustion theory and modeling. The reacting flow governing equations and the combustion chemistry are firstly reviewed, setting the ground for the analysis of
homogeneous gas-phase mixtures, laminar diffusion and premixed flames. Heterogeneous (catalytic) combustion, an area of increased importance in the last years, will be dealt in detail along with its coupling with homogeneous
combustion. Finally, approaches for the modeling of turbulent combustion will be presented. Available numerical codes will be used to compute the above described phenomena. Familiarity with numerical methods for the solution of partial differential equations is expected.
Lecture notesHandouts
Prerequisites / NoticeNEW course
401-5950-00LSeminar in Fluid Dynamics for CSE Restricted registration - show details W4 credits2SP. Jenny, T. Rösgen
AbstractEnlarged knowledge and practical abilities in fundamentals and applications of Computational Fluid Dynamics
ObjectiveEnlarged knowledge and practical abilities in fundamentals and applications of Computational Fluid Dynamics
Prerequisites / NoticeContact Prof. P. Jenny or Prof. T. Rösgen before the beginning of the semester
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