Autumn Semester 2020 takes place in a mixed form of online and classroom teaching.
Please read the published information on the individual courses carefully.

Search result: Catalogue data in Autumn Semester 2016

Environmental Sciences Bachelor Information
Bachelor Studies (Programme Regulations 2011)
Basic Courses II
Examination Blocks
Examination Block 1
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
402-0063-00LPhysics IIO5 credits3V + 1UA. Vaterlaus
AbstractIntroduction to the "way of thinking" and the methodology in Physics, with the help of demonstration experiments. The Chapters treated are Electromagnetism, Refraction and Diffraction of Waves, Elements of Quantum Mechanics with applications to Spectroscopy, Thermodynamics, Phase Transitions, Transport Phenomena. Whenever possible, examples relevant to the students' main field of study are given.
ObjectiveIntroduction to the scientific methodology. The student should develop his/her capability to turn physical observations into mathematical models, and to solve the latter.
ContentElektromagnetismus, Elektromagnetische Wellen, Wellenoptik, Strahlenoptik, Quantenoptik, Quantenmechanik, Thermische Eigenschaften, Transportphänomene, Wärmestrahlung
Lecture notesSkript wird verteilt.
LiteratureFriedhelm Kuypers
Physik für Ingenieure und Naturwissenschaftler
Band 2 Elektrizität, Optik, Wellen
Wiley-VCH, 2012
ISBN 3527411445, 9783527411443

Douglas C. Giancoli
Physik
3. erweiterte Auflage
Pearson Studium

Hans J. Paus
Physik in Experimenten und Beispielen
Carl Hanser Verlag, München, 2002, 1068 S.

Paul A. Tipler
Physik
Spektrum Akademischer Verlag, 1998, 1522 S., ca Fr. 120.-

David Halliday Robert Resnick Jearl Walker
Physik
Wiley-VCH, 2003, 1388 S., Fr. 87.- (bis 31.12.03)

dazu gratis Online Ressourcen (z.B. Simulationen): www.halliday.de
701-0245-00LIntroduction to Evolutionary BiologyO2 credits2VG. Velicer, S. Wielgoss
AbstractThis course introduces important questions about the evolutionary processes involved in the generation and maintenance of biological diversity across all domains of life and how evolutionary science investigates these questions.
ObjectiveThis course introduces important questions about the evolutionary processes involved in the generation and maintenance of biological diversity across all domains of life and how evolutionary science investigates these questions. The topics covered range from different forms of selection, phylogenetic analysis, population genetics, life history theory, the evolution of sex, social evolution to human evolution. These topics are important for the understanding of a number of evolutionary problems in the basic and applied sciences.
ContentTopics likely to be covered in this course include research methods in evolutionary biology, adaptation, evolution of sex, evolutionary transitions, human evolution, infectious disease evolution, life history evolution, macroevolution, mechanisms of evolution, phylogenetic analysis, population dynamics, population genetics, social evolution, speciation and types of selection.
LiteratureTextbook:
Evolutionary Analysis
Scott Freeman and Jon Herron
5th Edition, English.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe exam is based on lecture and textbook.
701-0255-00LBiochemistryO2 credits2VH.‑P. Kohler
AbstractBuilding on the biology courses in the 1st and 2nd semesters, this course covers basic biochemical knowledge in the areas of enzymology and metabolism. Those completing the course are able to describe and understand fundamental cellular metabolic processes.
ObjectiveStudents are able to understand
- the structure and function of biological macromolecules
- the kinetic bases of enzyme reactions
- thermodynamic and mechanistic basics of relevant metabolic processes
Students are able to describe the relevant metabolic reactions in detail
ContentProgram

Introduction, basics, composition of cells, biochemical units, repetition of relevant organic chemistry
Structure and function of proteins
Carbohydrates
Lipids an biological membranes
Enzymes and enzyme kinetics
Catalytic strategies
Metabolism: Basic concepts and design. Repetition of basic thermodynamics
Glycolysis, fermentation
The citric acid cycle
Oxidative phosphorylation
Fatty acid metabolism
Lecture notesHorton et al. (Pearson) serves as lecture notes.
Prerequisites / NoticeBasic knowledge in biology and chemistry is a precondition.
752-4001-00LMicrobiology Information O2 credits2VM. Schuppler, S. Schlegel, J. Vorholt-Zambelli
AbstractTeaching of basic knowledge in microbiology with main focus on Microbial Cell Structure and Function, Molecular Genetics, Microbial Growth, Metabolic Diversity, Phylogeny and Taxonomy, Prokaryotic Diversity, Human-Microbe Interactions, Biotechnology.
ObjectiveTeaching of basic knowledge in microbiology.
ContentDer Schwerpunkt liegt auf den Themen: Bakterielle Zellbiologie, Molekulare Genetik, Wachstumsphysiologie, Biochemische Diversität, Phylogenie und Taxonomie, Prokaryotische Vielfalt, Interaktion zwischen Menschen und Mikroorganismen sowie Biotechnologie.
Lecture notesWird von den jeweiligen Dozenten ausgegeben.
LiteratureDie Behandlung der Themen erfolgt auf der Basis des Lehrbuchs Brock, Biology of Microorganisms
Examination Block 2
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
701-0023-00LAtmosphere Information O3 credits2VH. Wernli, E. M. Fischer, T. Peter
AbstractBasic principles of the atmosphere, physical structure and chemical composition, trace gases, atmospheric cycles, circulation, stability, radiation, condensation, clouds, oxidation capacity and ozone layer.
ObjectiveUnderstanding of basic physical and chemical processes in the atmosphere. Understanding of mechanisms of and interactions between: weather - climate, atmosphere - ocean - continents, troposhere - stratosphere. Understanding of environmentally relevant structures and processes on vastly differing scales. Basis for the modelling of complex interrelations in the atmospehre.
ContentBasic principles of the atmosphere, physical structure and chemical composition, trace gases, atmospheric cycles, circulation, stability, radiation, condensation, clouds, oxidation capacity and ozone layer.
Lecture notesWritten information will be supplied.
Literature- John H. Seinfeld and Spyros N. Pandis, Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics: From Air Pollution to Climate Change, Wiley, New York, 1998.
- Gösta H. Liljequist, Allgemeine Meteorologie, Vieweg, Braunschweig, 1974.
701-0071-00LMathematics III: Systems AnalysisO4 credits2V + 1UN. Gruber, D. Byrne
AbstractThe objective of the systems analysis course is to deepen and illustrate the mathematical concepts on the basis of a series of very concrete examples. Topics covered include: linear box models with one or several variables, non-linear box models with one or several variables, time-discrete models, and continuous models in time and space.
ObjectiveLearning and applying of concepts (models) and quantitative methods to address concrete problems of environmental relevance. Understanding and applying the systems-analytic approach, i.e., Recognizing the core of the problem - simplification - quantitative approach - prediction.
Contenthttp://www.up.ethz.ch/education/systems-analysis.html
Lecture notesOverhead slides will be made available through Ilias.
LiteratureImboden, D.S. and S. Pfenninger (2013) Introduction to Systems Analysis: Mathematically Modeling Natural Systems. Berlin Heidelberg: Springer Verlag.

http://link.springer.com/book/10.1007%2F978-3-642-30639-6
701-0401-00LHydrosphereO3 credits2VR. Kipfer, C. Roques
AbstractQualitative and quantitative understanding of the physical processes that control the terrestrial water cycle. Energy and mass exchange, mixing and transport processes are described and the coupling of the hydrosphere with the atmosphere and the solid Earth are discussed.
ObjectiveQualitative and quantitative understanding of the physical processes that control the terrestrial water cycle. Energy and mass exchange, mixing and transport processes are described and the coupling of the hydrosphere with the atmosphere and the solid Earth are discussed.
ContentTopics of the course.
Physical properties of water (i.e. density and equation of state)
- global water resources
Exchange at boundaries
- energy (thermal & kinetic), gas exchange
Mixing and transport processes in open waters
- vertical stratification, large scale transport
- turbulence and mixing
- mixing and exchange processes in rivers
Groundwater and its dynamics
- ground water as part of the terrestrial water cycle
- ground water hydraulics, Darcy's law
- aquifers and their properties
- hydrochemistry and tracer
- ground water use
Case studies
- 1. Water as resource, 2. Water and climate
Lecture notesIn addition to the suggested literature handouts are distributed.
LiteratureSuggested literature.
a) Park, Ch., 2001, The Environment, Routledge, 2001
b) Price, M., 1996. Introducing groundwater. Chapman & Hall, London u.a.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe case studies and the analysis of the questions and problems are integral part of the course.
701-0501-00LPedosphere Information O3 credits2VR. Kretzschmar
AbstractIntroduction to the formation and properties of soils as a function of parent rock, landscape position, climate, and soil organisms. Complex relationships between soil forming processes, physical and chemical soil properties, soil biota, and ecological soil properties are explained and illustrated by numerous examples.
ObjectiveIntroduction to the formation and properties of soils as a function of parent rock, landscape position, climate, and soil organisms. Complex relationships between soil forming processes, physical and chemical soil properties, soil biota, and ecological soil properties are explained and illustrated by numerous examples.
ContentDefinition of the pedosphere, soil functions, rocks as parent materials, minerals and weathering, soil organisms, soil organic matter, physical soil properties and functions, chemical soil properties and functions, soil formation, principles of soil classification, global soil regions, soil fertility, land use and soil degradation.
Lecture notesLecture notes can be purchased during the first lecture (15.- SFr)
Literature- Scheffer/Schachtschabel - Soil Science, Springer, Heidelberg, 2016.

- Brady N.C. and Weil, R.R. The Nature and Properties of Soils. 14th ed. Prentice Hall, 2007.
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites: Basic knowledge in chemistry, biology and geology.
Additional Compulsory Courses
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
701-0033-00LLaboratory Course in Physics for Students of Environmental Sciences Information O2 credits4PM. Münnich, A. Biland, N. Gruber
AbstractThe course provides an individual experience of physical phenomena and the basic principles of experiments. By carrying out simple physical experiments the students learn the proper use measuring instruments, the correct evaluation of report of the measured data and how to interpret the final results.
ObjectiveThis laboratory course aims to provide basic knowledge of
- the setup of a physics experiment,
- the use of measurement instruments,
- various measuring techniques,
- the analysis or measurement errors,
- and the interpretations of the measured quantities.
ContentThe students select 8 out of 20 experiments which they like to conduct. For each of these experiments the students will analyze the data they measure estimate the error of there measurements and compare these with the physical theory. Additionally each student will present one of their experiments in a seminar.
Lecture notesManuals for the experiments are provided online.
701-0035-00LIntegrated Practical Observation Networks Information O1.5 credits4PJ. Henneberger, T. Tormann
AbstractObservation networks - the combination of individual instruments - are the starting point of quantitative environmental studies. The structure and idiosyncrasies of existing observation networks are shown. When working in individual experiments on practical problems, various types of observation networks are dealt with; questions related to data quality and data availability are discussed.
ObjectiveGetting acquainted with existing networks. Insight into problems related to measuring and interpreting multi-dimensional fields of atmospheric physical, atmospheric chemical, and geophysical parameters.
ContentObservation networks for atmospheric physical, atmospheric chemical, geophysical, hydrological and climatological parameters on different scales (synoptic: 1000 km; mesoscale: 100 km, and microscale: 100 m). Combination of surface observation with remotely sensed data (satellite, radar). Solving interpolation problems in multi-dimensional fields of the observed variables. Assessing the representativity of local values, i.e., the directly observed variable in an observation network.
Lecture notesThe script is published anew every year. Apart from the description of the scientific problems to be worked on in individual experiments, it contains some theoretical chapters on observation networks, as well as guidelines for writing and publishing scientific papers. The script can be downloaded as pdf from the course webpage.
LiteratureLiterature is listed in the script.
Social Sciences and Humanities Module
Module Economics
Compulsory Courses
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
363-0387-00LCorporate SustainabilityO3 credits2GV. Hoffmann
AbstractThe lectures addresses the assessment of corporate sustainability and its links to strategy, technology, and finance. Students learn why sustainability matters for managers and how businesses can act towards it. E-modules allow students to train critical thinking skills. In the 2nd half of the semester, sustainability challenges on water, energy, mobility, and food are explored in group projects.
ObjectiveUnderstand the limits and the potential of corporate sustainability for sustainable development

Develop critical thinking skills (argumentation, communication, evaluative judgment) that are useful in the context of corporate sustainability using an innovative writing and peer review method.

Be able to recognize and realize opportunities for corporate sustainability in a business environment
ContentOverview of the key concepts of corporate sustainability and topics related to Water, Energy, Mobility, and Food

Business implications of sustainable development, in particular for the assessment of sustainability performance, strategic change towards sustainability, technological innovations and sustainability, and finance and corporate sustainability.
Critical thinking skills for corporate sustainability.
In-depth case studies of corporate sustainability challenges in the track phase: How to deal with environmental pressure groups? How to use the strengths of business to solve pressing sustainability problems? How to catalyze technological innovations for sustainability? How to invest money in a sustainable way?
Lecture notesPresentation slides will be made available on moodle prior to lectures.
LiteratureLiterature recommendations will be distributed during the lecture
751-1551-00LRessourcen- und Umweltökonomie Information O3 credits2VL. Bretschger, A. Müller
AbstractRelationship between economy and environment, market failure, external effects and public goods, contingent valuation, internalisation of externalities; economics of non-renewable resources, economics of renewable resources, cost-benefit analysis, sustainability, and international aspects of resource and environmental economics.
ObjectiveUnderstanding of the basic issues and methods in resource and environmental economics; ability to solve typical problems in the field using the appropriate tools, which are concise verbal explanations, diagrams or mathematical expressions.

Topics are:
Introduction to resource and environmental economics
Importance of resource and environmental economics
Main issues of resource and environmental economics
Normative basis
Utilitarianism
Fairness according to Rawls
Economic growth and environment
Externalities in the environmental sphere
Governmental internalisation of externalities
Private internalisation of externalities: the Coase theorem
Free rider problem and public goods
Types of public policy
Efficient level of pollution
Tax vs. permits
Command and Control Instruments
Empirical data on non-renewable natural resources
Optimal price development: the Hotelling-rule
Effects of exploration and Backstop-technology
Effects of different types of markets.
Biological growth function
Optimal depletion of renewable resources
Social inefficiency as result of over-use of open-access resources
Cost-benefit analysis and the environment
Measuring environmental benefit
Measuring costs
Concept of sustainability
Technological feasibility
Conflicts sustainability / optimality
Indicators of sustainability
Problem of climate change
Cost and benefit of climate change
Climate change as international ecological externality
International climate policy: Kyoto protocol
Implementation of the Kyoto protocol in Switzerland
ContentEconomy and natural environment, welfare concepts and market failure, external effects and public goods, measuring externalities and contingent valuation, internalising external effects and environmental policy, economics of non-renewable resources, renewable resources, cost-benefit-analysis, sustainability issues, international aspects of resource and environmental problems, selected examples and case studies.
Lecture notesThe script and lecture material are provided at:
https://moodle-app2.let.ethz.ch/course/view.php?id=140
LiteraturePerman, R., Ma, Y., McGilvray, J, Common, M.: "Natural Resource & Environmental Economics", 3d edition, Longman, Essex 2003.
Core Courses
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
701-0763-00LBasic Concepts of ManagementW2 credits2VR. Schwarzenbach
AbstractThis course deals with fundamental and proven management concepts. The lecturers emphasize the pracitcal applicability of concepts. The course was designed in close cooperation with practitioneers; e.g. will Mr. S. Baldenweg, mechanical engineer ETH, MBA Insead, share his experience in several guest lectures.
ObjectiveStudents:
• will be familiar with basic general management concepts.
• learn about the fundamental concepts of strategy development with practical examples.
• will get to know the basic organisational issues and the essential types of organisations.
• get a rough overview on the concepts of financial management.
• will learn about the strategic positionining of small departments within larger organisations.
• will learn about the fundamental mechanisms for handling change, and will be able to recognise these situations.
• will learn the basic principles of project management and of successful self-management.
• will reflect on customer oriented information representation.
ContentManagement ist ein Massenberuf der durch klare Aufgaben und entsprechenden Werkzuge beschrieben werden kann. Die Positionierung einer Firma, oder eines Bereiches bedingt die Analyse des Umfeldes und die Befassung mit den zukünftigen Herausforderungen. Dazu werden verschiedene Ansätze gezeigt und die grundlegenden Denkmuster vermittelt. Für die Umsetzung einer Strategie muss die Zusammenarbeit von Menschen entsprechend organisiert werden. Dazu werden die wesentlichen Organisationsmodelle und die Dynamik von Organisationen vermittelt.
Die finanzielle Abbildung von Organisationen und Projekten wird übersichtsweise dargestellt und die stufengerechte Darstellung von Informationen anhand von realen Beispielen besprochen.
Die Inhalte werden durchgängig mit Praxisbeispielen illustriert.
Lecture notesSkripten werden elektronisch zur Verfügung gestellt.
https://ilias-app2.let.ethz.ch/goto.php?target=crs_51073&client_id=ilias_lda
LiteratureEmpfohlen werden folgende Titel für die Vertiefung einzelner Themen:

Drucker P. 1964: „Managing for Results”, Harper Collins Publishers“, 240 p.

Malik F. 2005: "Führen, Leisten, Leben. Wirksames Management für eine neue Zeit. ", Heyne, 408p.

Mintzberg H. et al. 2001: “Strategy Safari. The Complete guide through the wilds of strategic management: A Guided Tour Through the Wilds of Strategic Management”, Finanical Times, 416 p.

Osterwalder A., Pigneur Y. 2010: Business Model Generation: A Handbook for Visionaries, Game Changers, and Challengers, wiley, 278 p
Prerequisites / NoticeDeutsch
151-0757-00LEnvironmental ManagementW2 credits2GR. Züst
AbstractAn environmental management system has the objective to continuously improve the environmental performance of the activities, products and services of a company. The company has to introduce different management procedures. The goal of this lecture is to provide basics and specific procedure to implement the environmental dimension in the planning and decision making processes of an organisation.
ObjectiveOverview on environmental management and environmental management systems, general methods and principles.
ContentIntroduction to environmental mangement / environmental
management systems, energy and material flows; economical and
ecological problems in industry; charakterisation of an
enterprise (incl. management handbook); structur and contents of an
environmental management system; overview on the ISO 14001 ff. series; methodes for environmental evaluation and assessment; integrated management systems; planning methodology and life-cycle-design
design; planning exampl
Lecture notesInformation about environmental management and environmental
management systems will be provided by a CD or mail.
Literaturea list with literatures and links will be provided
Prerequisites / NoticeDelivery of a case study, worked out in groups. Language: Teaching in English on request.
351-0778-00LDiscovering Management
Entry level course in management for BSc, MSc and PHD students at all levels not belonging to D-MTEC. This course can be complemented with Discovering Management (Excercises) 351-0778-01.
W3 credits3GB. Clarysse, M. Ambühl, S. Brusoni, E. Fleisch, G. Grote, V. Hoffmann, P. Schönsleben, G. von Krogh, F. von Wangenheim
AbstractDiscovering Management offers an introduction to the field of business management and entrepreneurship for engineers and natural scientists. The module provides an overview of the principles of management, teaches knowledge about management that is highly complementary to the students' technical knowledge, and provides a basis for advancing the knowledge of the various subjects offered at D-MTEC.
ObjectiveDiscovering Management combines in an innovate format a set of lectures and an advanced business game. The learning model for Discovering Management involves 'learning by doing'. The objective is to introduce the students to the relevant topics of the management literature and give them a good introduction in entrepreneurship topics too. The course is a series of lectures on the topics of strategy, innovation, corporate finance, leadership, design thinking and corporate social responsibility. While the 14 different lectures provide the theoretical and conceptual foundations, the experiential learning outcomes result from the interactive business game. The purpose of the business game is to analyse the innovative needs of a large multinational company and develop a business case for the company to grow. This business case is as relevant to someone exploring innovation within an organisation as it is if you are planning to start your own business. By discovering the key aspects of entrepreneurial management, the purpose of the course is to advance students' understanding of factors driving innovation, entrepreneurship, and company success.
ContentDiscovering Management aims to broaden the students' understanding of the principles of business management, emphasizing the interdependence of various topics in the development and management of a firm. The lectures introduce students not only to topics relevant for managing large corporations, but also touch upon the different aspects of starting up your own venture. The lectures will be presented by the respective area specialists at D-MTEC.
The course broadens the view and understanding of technology by linking it with its commercial applications and with society. The lectures are designed to introduce students to topics related to strategy, corporate innovation, leadership, corporate and entrepreneurial finance, value chain analysis, corporate social responsibility, and business model innovation. Practical examples from industry experts will stimulate the students to critically assess these issues. Creative skills will be trained by the business game exercise, a participant-centered learning activity, which provides students with the opportunity to place themselves in the role of Chief Innovation Officer of a large multinational company. As they learn more about the specific case and identify the challenge they are faced with, the students will have to develop an innovative business case for this multinational corporation. Doing so, this exercise will provide an insight into the context of managerial problem-solving and corporate innovation, and enhance the students' appreciation for the complex tasks companies and managers deal with. The business game presents a realistic model of a company and provides a valuable learning platform to integrate the increasingly important development of the skills and competences required to identify entrepreneurial opportunities, analyse the future business environment and successfully respond to it by taking systematic decisions, e.g. critical assessment of technological possibilities.
Prerequisites / NoticeDiscovering Management is designed to suit the needs and expectations of Bachelor students at all levels as well as Master and PhD students not belonging to D-MTEC. By providing an overview of Business Management, this course is an ideal enrichment of the standard curriculum at ETH Zurich.
No prior knowledge of business or economics is required to successfully complete this course.
351-0778-01LDiscovering Management (Exercises)
Complementary exercises for the module Discovering Managment.

Prerequisite: Participation and successful completion of the module Discovering Management (351-0778-00L) is mandatory.
W1 credit1UB. Clarysse, L. De Cuyper
AbstractThis course is offered complementary to the basis course 351-0778-00L, "Discovering Management". The course offers additional exercises and case studies.
ObjectiveThis course is offered to complement the course 351-0778-00L. The course offers additional exercises and case studies.
ContentThe course offers additional exercises and case studies concering:
Strategic Management; Technology and Innovation Management; Operations and Supply Chain Management; Finance and Accounting; Marketing and Sales.

Please refer to the course website for further information on the content, credit conditions and schedule of the module: www.dm.ethz.ch
363-0503-00LPrinciples of MicroeconomicsW3 credits2GM. Filippini
AbstractThe course introduces basic principles, problems and approaches of microeconomics.
ObjectiveThe learning objectives of the course are:

(1) Students must be able to discuss basic principles, problems and approaches in microeconomics. (2) Students can analyse and explain simple economic principles in a market using supply and demand graphs. (3) Students can contrast different market structures and describe firm and consumer behaviour. (4) Students can identify market failures such as externalities related to market activities and illustrate how these affect the economy as a whole. (5) Students can apply simple mathematical treatment of some basic concepts and can solve utility maximization and cost minimization problems.
Lecture notesLecture notes, exercises and reference material can be downloaded from Moodle.
LiteratureN. Gregory Mankiw and Mark P. Taylor (2014), "Economics", 3rd edition, South-Western Cengage Learning.
The book can also be used for the course 'Principles of Macroeconomics' (Sturm)

For students taking only the course 'Principles of Microeconomics' there is a shorter version of the same book:
N. Gregory Mankiw and Mark P. Taylor (2014), "Microeconomics", 3rd edition, South-Western Cengage Learning.

Complementary:
1. R. Pindyck and D. Rubinfeld (2012), "Microeconomics", 8th edition, Pearson Education.
2. Varian, H.R. (2014), "Intermediate Microeconomics", 9th edition, Norton & Company
751-1101-00LFinances and Accounting SystemW2 credits2GM. Dumondel
AbstractTo understand accounting as a component of the complex system of the enterprise
ObjectiveTo understand accounting not as an isolated discipline, but as a part of the complex system of the enterprise
ContentAccounting system as a part of management economics.
The different steps for scheduling and evaluation of the accountancy will be studied. The main part of the lecture is dedicated to the financial accounting – nevertheless the fundamentals of the internal cost-accounting will also be presented. The lecture will also include the clarification of concrete cases and the calculation of practical exercises.
Lecture notesCourse documentation and specified educational books
LiteratureIn the lecture one indicates
851-0626-01LInternational Aid and Development
Does not take place this semester.
Prerequisites: Basic knowledge of economics
W2 credits2VI. Günther
AbstractThe course gives economic and empirical foundations for a sound understanding of the instruments, prospects and limitations of international development aid.
ObjectiveStudents have a theoretically and empirically sound understanding of the prospects and limitations of international development aid. Students are able to critically discuss the various aid instruments of bi-and multilateral donors and NGOs.
ContentIntroduction to the Determinants of Underdevelopment; History of Aid; Aid and Development: Theories and Empirics; Political Economy of Aid; Experience and Impact of Aid; New Instruments of Aid: e.g. Micro-Finance, Budget-Support; Fair-Trade.
LiteratureArticles and book abstracts will be uploaded to a course website.
Module Political and Social Sciences
Compulsory Courses
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
701-0747-00LEnvironmental Policy of Switzerland IO3 credits2VE. Lieberherr
AbstractThis course presents the basics of policy analysis and the specific characteristics of Swiss environmental policy. Policy instruments, actors and processes are addressed both theoretically as well as by means of current Swiss environmental policy examples.
ObjectiveBeyond acquiring basic knowledge about policy analysis, this course teaches students how to analytically address current and concrete questions of environmental policy. Through exercises the students learn about political science concepts and frameworks as well as real-life political decision-making processes. The well-grounded examination of complex political conflict situations is an important precondition for the entry into the (environmental policy) workforce or a future research career.
ContentThe processes of change, overuse or destruction of the natural environment through humans have historically placed high demands on social and political institutions. In the interplay between the environment, society and economy, the environmental policy field encompasses the sum of public measures that have the goal to eliminate, reduce or avoid environmental degradation. The course systematically presents the basics of environmental policy instruments, actors, programs and processes as well as their change over time. A key aspect is the distinction between politics and political science and specifically environmental policy.
Lecture notesInstead of lecture notes different texts on policy analysis and Swiss environmental policy are made available to the students.
LiteratureThe lecture is based on the following book to be published in the summer of 2016:
Ingold, K., Lieberherr, E., Schläpfer, I., Steinmann, K. und Zimmermann, W. Umweltpolitik der Schweiz: ein Lehrbuch. Zürich: Dike Verlag.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe detailed semester program (syllabus) is made available to the students at the beginning of the semester.
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