Search result: Catalogue data in Autumn Semester 2017

Civil Engineering Master Information
1. Semester
Seminar Work
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
101-0007-00LProject Management for Construction Projects Restricted registration - show details O4 credits3SB. T. Adey, J. J. Hoffman
AbstractThis course is designed to lay down the foundation of the different concepts, techniques, and tools for successful project management of construction projects.
ObjectiveThe goal is that at the end of this course students should have a good understanding of the different project management knowledge areas, the phases required for successful project management, and the role of a project manager. To demonstrate this, students will work in groups in different case studies to apply the concepts, tools and techniques presented in the class.

Two 4 hours sessions towards the end of the lecture series will introduce a practical project to allow the teams to demonstrate the tools and techniques learned during the semester.
ContentThe main content of the course is summarized in the following topics:
- Project and organization structures
- Project scheduling
- Resource management
- Project estimating
- Project financing
- Risk management
- Project Reporting
- Interpersonal skills
Lecture notesThe slides for the class will be available for download from Moodle at least one day before each class. Copies of all necessary documents will be distributed at appropriate times.
LiteratureRelevant readings will be recommended throughout the course (and made available to the students via Moodle).
Major Courses
Major in Construction and Maintenance Management
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
066-0415-00LBuilding Physics: Theory and Applications Information Restricted registration - show details W4 credits3V + 1UJ. Carmeliet, J. Allegrini, D. Derome
AbstractPrinciples of heat and mass transport, hygro-thermal performance, durability of the building envelope and interaction with indoor and outdoor climates, applications.
ObjectiveThe students will acquire in the following fields:
- Principles of heat and mass transport and its mathematical description.
- Indoor and outdoor climate and driving forces.
- Hygrothermal properties of building materials.
- Building envelope solutions and their construction.
- Hygrothermal performance and durability.
ContentPrinciples of heat and mass transport, hygro-thermal performance, durability of the building envelope and interaction with indoor and outdoor climates, applications.
529-0193-00LRenewable Energy Technologies I
Does not take place this semester.
The lectures Renewable Energy Technologies I (529-0193-00L) and Renewable Energy Technologies II (529-0191-01L) can be taken independently from one another.
W4 credits3GA. Wokaun, A. Steinfeld
AbstractScenarios for world energy demand and CO2 emissions, implications for climate. Methods for the assessment of energy chains. Potential and technology of renewable energies: Biomass (heat, electricity, biofuels), solar energy (low temp. heat, solar thermal and photovoltaic electricity, solar chemistry). Wind and ocean energy, heat pumps, geothermal energy, energy from waste. CO2 sequestration.
ObjectiveScenarios for the development of world primary energy consumption are introduced. Students know the potential and limitations of renewable energies for reducing CO2 emissions, and their contribution towards a future sustainable energy system that respects climate protection goals.
ContentScenarios for the development of world energy consumption, energy intensity and economic development. Energy conversion chains, primary energy sources and availability of raw materials. Methods for the assessment of energy systems, ecological balances and life cycle analysis of complete energy chains. Biomass: carbon reservoirs and the carbon cycle, energetic utilisation of biomass, agricultural production of energy carriers, biofuels. Solar energy: solar collectors, solar-thermal power stations, solar chemistry, photovoltaics, photochemistry. Wind energy, wind power stations. Ocean energy (tides, waves). Geothermal energy: heat pumps, hot steam and hot water resources, hot dry rock (HDR) technique. Energy recovery from waste. Greenhouse gas mitigation, CO2 sequestration, chemical bonding of CO2. Consequences of human energy use for ecological systems, atmosphere and climate.
Lecture notesLecture notes will be distributed electronically during the course.
Literature- Kaltschmitt, M., Wiese, A., Streicher, W.: Erneuerbare Energien (Springer, 2003)

- Tester, J.W., Drake, E.M., Golay, M.W., Driscoll, M.J., Peters, W.A.: Sustainable Energy - Choosing Among Options (MIT Press, 2005)

- G. Boyle, Renewable Energy: Power for a sustainable futureOxford University Press, 3rd ed., 2012, ISBN: 978-0-19-954533-9

-V. Quaschning, Renewable Energy and Climate ChangeWiley- IEEE, 2010, ISBN: 978-0-470-74707-0, 9781119994381 (online)
Prerequisites / NoticeFundamentals of chemistry, physics and thermodynamics are a prerequisite for this course.

Topics are available to carry out a Project Work (Semesterarbeit) on the contents of this course.
066-0427-00LDesign and Building Process MBS Information W2 credits2VA. Paulus, S. Menz
Abstract"Design and Building Process MBS" is a brief manual for prospective architects and engineers covering the competencies and the responsibilities of all involved parties through the design and building process. Lectures on twelve compact aspects gaining importance in a increasingly specialised, complex and international surrounding.
ObjectiveParticipants will come to understand how they can best navigate the design and building process, especially in relation to understanding their profession, gaining a thorough knowledge of rules and regulations, as well as understanding how involved parties' minds work. They will also have the opportunity to investigate ways in which they can relate to, understand, and best respond to their clients' wants and needs. Finally, course participants will come to appreciate the various tools and instruments, which are available to them when implementing their projects. The course will guide the participants, bringing the individual pieces of knowledge into a superordinate relationship.
Content"Design and Building Process MBS" is a brief manual for prospective architects and engineers covering the competencies and the responsibilities of involved parties through the design and building process. Twelve compact aspects regarding the establishe building culture are gaining importance in an increasingly specialised, complex and international surrounding. Lectures on the topics of profession, service model, organisation, project, design quality, coordination, costing, tendering and construction management, contracts and agreements, life cycle, real estate market, and getting started will guide the participants, bringing the individual pieces of knowledge into a superordinate relationship. The course introduces the key figures, depicts the criteria of the project and highlights the proveded services of the consultants. In addition to discussing the basics, the terminologies and the tendencies, the lecture units will refer to the studios as well as the prctice: Teaching-based case studies will compliment and deepen the understanding of the twelve selected aspects. The course is presented as a moderated seminar to allow students the opportunity for invididual input: active cololaboration between the students and their tutor therefore required.
101-0427-01LPublic Transport Design and Operations
Remark:
Former title until HS16 "System- und Netzplanung ".
W6 credits4GF. Corman, V. De Martinis
AbstractThis course aims at analyzing, designing, improving public transport systems, as part of the overall transport system.
ObjectivePublic transport is a key driver for making our cities more livable, clean and accessible, providing safe, and sustainable travel options for millions of people around the globe. Proper planning of public transport system also ensures that the system is competitive in terms of speed and cost. Public transport is a crucial asset, whose social, economic and environmental benefits extend beyond those who use it regularly; it reduces the amount of cars and road infrastructure in cities; reduces injuries and fatalities associated to car accidents, and gives transport accessibility to very large demographic groups.

Goal of the class is to understand the main characteristics and differences of public transport networks.
Their various performance criteria based on various perspective and stakeholders.
The most relevant decision making problems in a planning tactical and operational point of view
At the end of this course, students can critically analyze existing networks of public transport, their design and use; consider and substantiate possible improvements to existing networks of public transport and the management of those networks; optimize the use of resources in public transport.

General structure:
general introduction of transport, modes, technologies,
system design and line planning for different situations,
mathematical models for design and line planning
timetabling and tactical planning, and related mathematical approaches
operations, and quantitative support to operational problems,
evaluation of public transport systems.
ContentBasics for line transport systems and networks
Passenger/Supply requirements for line operations
Objectives of system and network planning, from different perspectives and users, design dilemmas
Conceptual concepts for passenger transport: long-distance, urban transport, regional, local transport

Planning process, from demand evaluation to line planning to timetables to operations
Matching demand and modes
Line planning techniques
Timetabling principles

Allocation of resources
Management of operations
Measures of realized operations
Improvements of existing services
Lecture notesLecture slides are provided.
LiteratureCeder, Avi: Public Transit Planning and Operation, CRC Press, 2015, ISBN 978-1466563919 (English)

Holzapfel, Helmut: Urbanismus und Verkehr – Bausteine für Architekten, Stadt- und Verkehrsplaner, Vieweg+Teubner, Wiesbaden 2012, ISBN 978-3-8348-1950-5 (Deutsch)

Hull, Angela: Transport Matters – Integrated approaches to planning city-regions, Routledge / Taylor & Francis Group, London / New York 2011, ISBN 978-0-415-48818-4 (English)

Vuchic, Vukan R.: Urban Transit – Operations, Planning, and Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Hoboken / New Jersey 2005, ISBN 0-471-63265-1 (English)

Walker, Jarrett: Human Transit – How clearer thinking about public transit can enrich our communities and our lives, ISLAND PRESS, Washington / Covelo / London 2012, ISBN 978-1-59726-971-1 (English)

White, Peter: Public Transport - Its Planning, Management and Operation, 5th edition, Routledge, London / New York 2009, ISBN 978-0415445306 (English)
101-0522-00LIntroduction to Construction Information Management & Modelling
Does not take place this semester.
W+3 credits2Gto be announced
AbstractThis course will provide both a theoretical background and a pragmatic project work (case studies) on current trends and developments of information modeling and management in the construction industry around the world and in Switzerland. The course will include external lecturers from engineering and construction companies in Switzerland.
ObjectiveStudents enrolled in this course are expected to become familiar with current information modeling and management technologies and their applications to the construction industry, and to get a good understanding of new project delivery systems and technologies for integrated practice.
ContentThe content of the course is summarized in the following topics:
- Introduction to information modeling and management technologies
- Integrated Project Delivery (IPD) (vs. traditional delivery methods)
- Information model execution plan
- Information modeling tools and parametric modeling
- Interoperability
- Standards and foundations
- Implications for engineers and the construction industry
- Implications for owners and facility managers
- Information Modeling and Prefabrication
- Construction Analysis and Planning (4D modeling)
- Quantity Takeoff and Cost Estimating (5D modeling)
Lecture notesThe slides for the class will be available for download from Moodle at least one day before each class. Copies of all necessary documents will be distributed at appropriate times.
LiteratureRelevant readings will be recommended throughout the course and made available to the students via Moodle.
Prerequisites / NoticeThere are no pre-requisites to enroll in this course.

Note: the use of special software (e.g. Revit, ArchiCAD) or simulation software (e.g., Bentley ConstrucSim, Navisworks, Solibri Model Checker, etc.) is beyond the scope of this course.
101-0509-00LInfrastructure Management 1: Process
Remark: Former Title "Infrastructure Management Systems".
W+4 credits3GB. T. Adey
AbstractThe course provides an introduction to the steps included in the infrastructure management process. The lectures are given by a mixture of external people in German and internal people in English.
ObjectiveUpon completion of the course, students will
- understand the steps required to manage infrastructure effectively,
- understand the complexity of these steps, and
- have an overview of the tools that they can use in each of the steps.
Content- The infrastructure management process and guidelines
- Knowing the infrastructure - Dealing with data
- Establishing goals and constraints
- Establishing organization structure and processes
- Making predictions
- Selecting strategies
- Developing programs
- Planning interventions
- Conducting impact analysis
- Reviewing the process
Lecture notesAppropriate reading / and study material will be handed out during the course.
Transparencies will be handed out at the beginning of each class.
LiteratureAppropriate literature will be handed out when required.
101-0517-10LConstruction Management for TunnelingW3 credits2GH. Ehrbar
AbstractBauverfahren für konventionelle Vortriebe im Lockermaterial und im Fels (Tunnel-, Schacht- und Kavernenbau)
-Bauverfahren für maschinellen Vortrieb
-Entscheidungskriterien für die Wahl der Vortriebsmethoden
-Baustelleneinrichtungen, Logistik und Analyse des Baubetriebs
ObjectiveVermittlung praxisnaher Kenntnisse bezüglich
-Auswahl der Bauverfahren
-Arbeitszyklen und Ausführung im konventionellen und maschinellen Vortrieb, inkl. Materialbewirtschaftung
-Ausführungskontrollen und Überwachung
-Anforderungen der Arbeitssicherheit, Gesundheitsschutz und Umweltschutz
-Leistungsermittlung, Termin- und Kostenplanung
-Erhaltungsmassnahmen
Die Studierenden werden befähigt, ein Untertagbauprojekt in der Phase Bauprojekt als Planer (unter Berücksichtigung unternehmerischer Überlegungen) zu bearbeiten.
ContentAllgemeine Grundlagen
-SIA 196, SIA 197, SIA 198, SIA 118/198
-Kenntnis der Vortriebsmethoden
-Entscheidungsgrundlagen zur Wahl der Vortriebsmethode
-Baustellenlogistik (Transporte, Lüftung, Kühlung, Wasser, Materialbewirtschaftung)
-Werkstoffe

Konventioneller Vortrieb
-Ausbruchmethoden (Vollausbruch / Teilausbruch)
-Ausbruchsicherung
-Abdichtung
-Innengewölbe

Maschineller Vortrieb
-Offener Vortrieb (Gripper-TBM), Ausbruchsicherungskonzepte
-Schildvortriebe

Innenausbau
-Abdichtung und Entwässerung
-Innengewölbe
-Bankette

BIM im Tunnelbau
-Überblick über den derzeitigen Stand und künftige Entwicklungsschritte
Lecture notesVorlesungsfolien
LiteratureIm Rahmen der Vorlesung wird auf die gängige Fachliteratur hingewiesen
Major in Geotechnical Engineering
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
101-0317-00LTunnelling IW+3 credits2GG. Anagnostou, E. Pimentel
AbstractBasic aspects of design and analysis of underground structures. Conventional tunnel construction methods. Auxiliary measures (ground improvement and drainage, forepoling, face reinforcement). Numerical analysis methods.
ObjectiveBasic aspects of design and analysis of underground structures. Conventional tunnel construction methods. Auxiliary measures (ground improvement and drainage, forepoling, face reinforcement). Numerical analysis methods.
ContentNumerical analysis methods in tunnelling.
Conventional excavation methods (full face, top heading and bench, side drift method, ...)
Auxiliary measures:
- Injections
- Jet grouting
- Ground freezing
- Drainage
- Forepoling
- Face reinforcement
Lecture notesAutographieblätter
LiteratureEmpfehlungen
101-0357-00LTheoretical and Experimental Soil Mechanics Restricted registration - show details
Prerequisites: Mechanics I, II and III.

The number of participants is limited to 60 due to the existing laboratory equipment! Students with major in Geotechnical Engineering have priority. Registrations will be accepted in the order they are received.
W+6 credits4GI. Anastasopoulos, O. Adamidis, R. Herzog
AbstractOverview of soil behaviour
Explanation of typical applications: reality, modelling, laboratory tests with transfer of results to the practical examples
Consolidation theory and typical applications in practice
Triaxial & direct shear tests: consolidation & shear, drained & undrained response
Plasticity theory & Critical State Soil Mechanics, Cam Clay
Application of plasticity theory
ObjectiveExtend knowledge of theoretical approaches that can be used to describe soil behaviour to enable students to carry out more advanced geotechnical design and to plan the appropriate laboratory tests to obtain relevant parameters for coupled plasticity models of soil behaviour.
A further goal is to give students the wherewithal to be able to select an appropriate constitutive model and set up insitu stress conditions in preparation for subsequent numerical modelling (e.g. with finite elements).
ContentOverview of soil behaviour
Discussion of general gaps between basic theory and soil response
Stress paths in practice & in laboratory tests
Explanation of typical applications: reality, modelling, laboratory tests with transfer of results to the practical examples
Consolidation theory for incremental and continuous loading oedometer tests and typical applications in practice
Triaxial & direct shear tests: consolidation & shear, drained & undrained response
Plasticity theory & Critical State Soil Mechanics, Cam Clay
Application of plasticity theory
Lecture notesPrinted script with web support
Exercises
Literaturehttp://geotip.igt.ethz.ch/
Prerequisites / NoticeLectures will be conducted as Problem Based Learning within the framework of a case history
Virtual laboratory in support of 'hands-on' experience of selected laboratory tests

Pre-requirements: Basic knowledge in soil mechanics as well as knowledge of advanced mechanics
Laboratory equipment will be available for 60 students. First priority goes to those registered for the geotechnics specialty in the Masters, 2nd year students then first year students, doctoral students qualifying officially for their PhD status and then 'first come, first served'.
101-0307-00LDesign and Construction in Geotechnical Engineering Restricted registration - show details W4 credits3GI. Anastasopoulos, A. Marin
AbstractThis lecture deals with the practical application of the knowledge gained in the fundamental lectures from the Bachelor degree.
The basics of planing and design of geotechnical structures will be taught for the main topics geotechical engineers are faced to in practice.
ObjectiveTransfer of the fundamental knowledge taught in the Bachelor degree to practical application.
Ability to plan and design geotechnical structures based on the state of the art.
ContentIntroduction to Swisscode SIA
Foundations and settlements
Pile foundations
Excavations
Slopes
Soil nailing
Reinforced geosystems
Ground improvement
River levees
Lecture notesScript in the form of chapters and powerpoint overheads with web support (http://geotip.igt.ethz.ch)
Exercises
Literaturerelevant literature will be stated during the lectures
Prerequisites / NoticePre-condition: Successful examinations (pass) in the geotechnical studies (soil mechanics and ground engineering, each 5 credits) in the Bachelor degree of Civil Engineering (ETH), or equivalent for new students.

The lecture contains at least one presentation from practice
101-0369-00LForensic Geotechnical Engineering Information Restricted registration - show details
Prerequisites: successful participation in "Geotechnical Engineering" (101-0315-00L) or an equivalent course.
W3 credits2GA. Puzrin
AbstractIn this course selected famous geotechnical failures are investigated with the following purpose: (a) to deepen understanding of the geotechnical risks and possible solutions; (b) to practice design and analysis methods; (c) to learn the techniques for investigation of failures; (d) to learn the techniques for mitigation of the failure damage.
ObjectiveIn this course selected famous geotechnical failures are investigated with the following purpose: (a) to deepen understanding of the geotechnical risks and possible solutions; (b) to practice design and analysis methods; (c) to learn the techniques for investigation of failures; (d) to learn the techniques for mitigation of the failure damage.
ContentFailure due to the loading history
Failure due to the creeping landslides
Failure due to excessive settlements
Failure due to the leaning instability
Failure due to tunnelling
Bearing capacity failure
Excavation failure
Lecture notesLecture notes
Exercises
LiteraturePuzrin, A.M.; Alonso, E.E.; Pinyol, N.M.: Geomechanics of failures. Springer, 2010.

Lang, H.J; Huder, J; Amann, P.; Puzrin, A.M.: Bodenmechanik und Grundbau, Springer-Lehrbuch, 9. Auflage, 2010.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe course is given in the first MSc semester.
Prerequisite: Basic knowledge in Geotechnical Engineering (Course content of "Grundbau" or similar lecture).
Major in Structural Engineering
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
101-0117-00LTheory of Structures IIIO3 credits2GB. Stojadinovic
AbstractThis course focuses on the axial, shear, bending and torsion load-deformation response of continuous elastic prismatic structural elements such as rods, beams, shear walls, frames, arches, cables and rings. Additional special topics, such as the behavior of inelastic prismatic structural elements or the behavior of planar structural elements and structures, may be addressed time-permitting.
ObjectiveAfter passing this course students will be able to:
1. Explain the equilibrium of continuous structural elements.
2. Formulate mechanical models of continuous prismatic structural elements.
3. Analyze the axial, shear, bending and torsion load-deformation response of prismatic structural elements and structures assembled using these elements.
4. Determine the state of forces and deformations in rods, beams, frame structures, arches, cables and rings under combined mechanical and thermal loading.
5. Use the theory of continuous structures to design structures and understand the basis for structural design code provisions.
ContentThis is the third course in the ETH series on theory of structures. Building on the material covered in previous courses, this course focuses on the axial, shear, bending and torsion load-deformation response of continuous elastic prismatic structural elements such as rods, beams, shear walls, frames, arches, cables and rings. Additional special topics, such as the behavior of inelastic prismatic structural elements or the behavior of planar structural elements and structures may be addressed if time permits. The course provides the theoretical background and engineering guidelines for practical structural analysis of modern structures.
Lecture notesLecture notes "Theory of Structures III"
LiteratureMarti, Peter, “Baustatik: Grundlagen, Stabtragwerke, Flächentragwrke”, Ernst & Sohn, Berlin, 2. Auflage, 2014

Bouma, A. L., “Mechanik schlanker Tragwerke: Ausgewählte Beispiele der Praxis”, Springer Verlag, Berlin, 1993.
Prerequisites / NoticeWorking knowledge of theory of structures, as covered in ETH course Theory of Structures I (Baustatik I) and Theory of Structures II (Baustatik II) and ordinary differential equations. Basic knowledge of structural design of reinforced concrete, steel or wood structures. Familiarity with structural analysis computer software and computer tools such as Matlab, Mathematica, Mathcad or Excel.
101-0127-00LStructural Concrete III Information O3 credits2GW. Kaufmann
AbstractThis course supplements the courses Structural Concrete I and II regarding the analysis and dimensioning of reinforced and prestressed concrete structures. It focuses on lower bound and upper bound limit analysis methods for girders, discs and shells, particularly regarding their applicability to the safety assessment of existing structures.
ObjectiveEnhancement of the understanding of the load-deformation reponse of reinforced and prestressed concrete; refined knowledge of models and ability to apply them to general problems, particularly regarding the structural safety assessment of existing structures; awareness of the limits of applicability of limit analysis methods and ability to check their applicability.
ContentFundamentals (structural analysis, theorems of limit analysis, applicability of limit analysis methods); shear walls and girders (stress fields and truss models, failure mechanisms, deformation capacity, membrane elements with yield conditions and load-deformation behaviour); slabs (equilibrium solutions, yield conditions, failure mechanisms, shear in slabs); prestressed concrete for plate and shell structures; long term effects; complements.
Lecture notesLecture notes see http://www.kaufmann.ibk.ethz.ch/en/education/master/structural-concrete-iii.html
LiteratureMarti, P., Alvarez, M., Kaufmann, W. und Sigrist, V., "Tragverhalten von Stahlbeton", IBK Publikation SP-008, Sept. 1999, 301 pp.
Muttoni, A., Schwartz, J. und Thürlimann, B.,: "Bemessung von Betontragwerken mit Spannungsfeldern", Birkhäuser Verlag, Basel, 1997, 145 pp.
101-0137-00LSteel Structures IIIO3 credits2GM. Fontana, R. Bärtschi, M. Knobloch
AbstractEnhance theoretical considerations and detailing of structural steel design including aspects of economy and erection. E.g. Cranes, composite construction (compression and bending, continuous girders, partial connection, serviceability), fire design, stability of frames and buckling of plates with stiffeners, cold rolled sections, corrosion protection, price calculation and quality control
ObjectiveEnhance theoretical considerations und detailing of structural steel design including aspects of economy and erection.
ContentConstructive design of cranes, composite construction (compression and bending, continuous girders, partial connection, serviceability), fire design, stability of frames and buckling of plates with stiffeners, cold rolled sections, corrosion protection, price calculation and quality control
Lecture notesAutography
Copies of presentations
Literature- Stahlbauhandbuch 1 und 2, Stahlbau-Verlags-GmbH, Köln
- Stahlbaukalender 2000, Ernst + Sohn, Berlin, 1999
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites: Steel Structures I and II
101-0187-00LStructural Reliability and Risk Analysis Information W3 credits2GS. Marelli
AbstractStructural reliability aims at quantifying the probability of failure of systems due to uncertainties in their design, manufacturing and environmental conditions. Risk analysis combines this information with the consequences of failure in view of optimal decision making. The course presents the underlying probabilistic modelling and computational methods for reliability and risk assessment.
ObjectiveThe goal of this course is to provide the students with a thorough understanding of the key concepts behind structural reliability and risk analysis. After this course the students will have refreshed their knowledge of probability theory and statistics to model uncertainties in view of engineering applications. They will be able to analyze the reliability of a structure and to use risk assessment methods for decision making under uncertain conditions. They will be aware of the state-of-the-art computational methods and software in this field.
ContentEngineers are confronted every day to decision making under limited amount of information and uncertain conditions. When designing new structures and systems, the design codes such as SIA or Euro- codes usually provide a framework that guarantees safety and reliability. However the level of safety is not quantified explicitly, which does not allow the analyst to properly choose between design variants and evaluate a total cost in case of failure. In contrast, the framework of risk analysis allows one to incorporate the uncertainty in decision making.

The first part of the course is a reminder on probability theory that is used as a main tool for reliability and risk analysis. Classical concepts such as random variables and vectors, dependence and correlation are recalled. Basic statistical inference methods used for building a probabilistic model from the available data, e.g. the maximum likelihood method, are presented.

The second part is related to structural reliability analysis, i.e. methods that allow one to compute probabilities of failure of a given system with respect to prescribed criteria. The framework of reliability analysis is first set up. Reliability indices are introduced together with the first order-second moment method (FOSM) and the first order reliability method (FORM). Methods based on Monte Carlo simulation are then reviewed and illustrated through various examples. By-products of reliability analysis such as sensitivity measures and partial safety coefficients are derived and their links to structural design codes is shown. The reliability of structural systems is also introduced as well as the methods used to reassess existing structures based on new information.

The third part of the course addresses risk assessment methods. Techniques for the identification of hazard scenarios and their representation by fault trees and event trees are described. Risk is defined with respect to the concept of expected utility in the framework of decision making. Elements of Bayesian decision making, i.e. pre-, post and pre-post risk assessment methods are presented.

The course also includes a tutorial using the UQLab software dedicated to real world structural reliability analysis.
Lecture notesSlides of the lectures are available online every week. A printed version of the full set of slides is proposed to the students at the beginning of the semester.
LiteratureAng, A. and Tang, W.H, Probability Concepts in Engineering - Emphasis on Applications to Civil and Environmental Engineering, 2nd Edition, John Wiley & Sons, 2007.

S. Marelli, R. Schöbi, B. Sudret, UQLab user manual - Structural reliability (rare events estimation), Report UQLab-V0.92-107.
Prerequisites / NoticeBasic course on probability theory and statistics
101-0157-01LStructural Dynamics and Vibration ProblemsW3 credits2GB. Stojadinovic, V. Ntertimanis
AbstractFundamentals of structural dynamics are presented. Computing the response of elastic and inelastic single-DOF, continuous-mass and multiple-DOF structural systems subjected to harmonic, periodic, pulse, impulse, and random excitation is discussed. Practical solutions to vibration problems in flexible structures excited by humans, machinery, wind and explosions are developed.
ObjectiveAfter successful completion of this course the students will be able to:
1. Explain the dynamic equilibrium of structures under dynamic loading.
2. Use second-order differential equations to theoretically and numerically model the dynamic equilibrium of structural systems.
3. Model structural systems using single-degree-of-freedom, continuous-mass and multiple-degree-of-freedom models.
4. Compute the dynamic response of structural system to harmonic, periodic, pulse, impulse and random excitation using time-history and response-spectrum methods.
5. Apply structural dynamics principles to solve vibration problems in flexible structures excited by humans, machines, wind or explosions.
6. Use dynamics of structures to identify the basis for structural design code provisions related to dynamic loading.
ContentThis is a course on structural dynamics, an extension of structural analysis for loads that induce significant inertial forces and vibratory response of structures. Dynamic responses of elastic and inelastic single-degree-of-freedom, continuous-mass and multiple-degree-of-freedom structural systems subjected to harmonic, periodic, pulse, impulse, and random excitation are discussed. Theoretical background and engineering guidelines for practical solutions to vibration problems in flexible structures caused by humans, machinery, wind or explosions are presented. Laboratory demonstrations of single- and multi-degree-of-freedom system dynamic response and use of viscous and tuned-mass dampers are conducted.
Lecture notesThe electronic copies of the learning material will be uploaded to ILIAS and available through myStudies. The learning material includes: the lecture presentations, additional reading material, and exercise problems and solutions.
LiteratureDynamics of Structures: Theory and Applications to Earthquake Engineering, 4th edition, Anil Chopra, Prentice Hall, 2014

Vibration Problems in Structures: Practical Guidelines, Hugo Bachmann et al., Birkhäuser, Basel, 1995

Weber B., Tragwerksdynamik. http://e-collection.ethbib.ethz.ch/cgi-bin/show.pl?type=lehr&nr=76 .ETH Zürich, 2002.
Prerequisites / NoticeKnowledge of the fundamentals in structural analysis, and in structural design of reinforced concrete, steel and/or wood structures is mandatory. Working knowledge of matrix algebra and ordinary differential equations is required. Familiarity with Matlab and with structural analysis computer software is desirable.
051-0551-00LEnergy- and Climate Systems I Information
Expiring study program according to BSc 2011 regulations.
W2 credits2GA. Schlüter
AbstractThe first semester of the annual course focuses on physical principles, component and systems for the efficient and sustainable heating, cooling and ventilation of buildings on different scales and the interaction of technical systems with architectural and urban design.
ObjectiveAfter this lecture, students can identify relevant physical principles, active and passive approaches, technical components and systems for efficient and sustainable supply of buildings with heat, cold and fresh air. Students are aware of the implications and interactions of such technical systems on urban and architectural design, construction and operation of buildings. Using simplified methods of analysis and quantification, students are able to estimate the relevant qualities and quantities to supply a building.
Content1. Introduction and overview
2. Heating and cooling systems in buildings
3. Thermal storage
4. District energy systems
5. Natural and mechanical ventilation
Lecture notesThe Slides from the lecture serve as lecture notes and are available as download.
LiteratureA list of relevant literature is available at the chair.
101-0177-00LBuilding Physics: Moisture and Durability Information W3 credits2GJ. Carmeliet, T. Defraeye
AbstractMoisture transport and related degradation processes in building and civil engineering materials and structures; concepts of poromechanics and multiscale analysis; analysis of damage cases.
Objective- Basic knowledge of moisture transport and related degradation processes in building and civil engineering materials and structures
- Introduction to concepts of poromechanics and multiscale analysis
- Application of knowledge by the analysis of damage cases
Content1. Introduction
Moisture damage: problem statement
Durability

2. Moisture Transport
Description of moisture transport
Determination of moisture transport properties
Hysteresis
Transport in cracked materials
Damage and moisture transport in cracked media

3. Poromechanics
Moisture and mechanics: poro-elasticity
Poro-elasticity and salt crystallisation
Poro-elasticity and damage
Case studies

4. Multiscale analysis
Problem statement
Multiscale transport model
Multiscale coupled transport - damage model
101-0167-01LFibre Composite Materials in Structural EngineeringW3 credits2GM. Motavalli
Abstract1) Lamina and Laminate Theory
2) FRP Manufacturing and Testing Methods
3) Design and Application of Externally Bonded Reinforcement to Concrete, Timber, Masonry, and metallic Structures
4) FRP Reinforced Concrete, All FRP Structures
5) Measurement Techniques and Structural Health Monitoring
ObjectiveAt the end of the course, you shall be able to

1) Design advanced FRP composites for your structures,

2) To consult owners and clients with necessray testing and SHM techniques for FRP structures,

3) Continue your education as a phd student in this field.
ContentFibre Reinforced Polymer (FRP) composites are increasingly being used in civil infrastructure applications, such as reinforcing rods, tendons and FRP profiles as well as wraps for seismic upgrading of columns and repair of deteriorated structures. The objective of this course is on one hand to provide new generation of engineering students with an overall awareness of the application and design of FRP reinforcing materials for internal and external strengthening (repair) of reinforced concrete structures. The FRP strengthening of other structures such as metallic, timber and masonry will also be shortly discussed. On the other hand the course will provide guidance to students seeking additional information on the topic. Many practical cases will be presented analysed and discussed. An ongoing structural health monitoring of these new materials is necessary to ensure that the structures are performing as planned, and that the safety and integrity of structures is not compromised. The course outlines some of the primary considerations to keep in mind when designing and utilizing structural health monitoring technologies. During the course, students will have the opportunity to design FRP strengthened concrete beams, apply the FRP by themselves, and finally test their samples up to failure.
Lecture notes1) Power Point Printouts
2) Handouts
Literature1) Lawrence C. Bank, Composites for Construction: Structural Design with FRP Materials, John Wiley & Sons, ISBN-13: 978-0471-68126-7

2) fib bulletin 14, Externally Bonded FRP Reinforcement for RC Structures, 2001

3) Eckold G., Design and Manufacture of Composite Structures, ISBN 1 85573 051 0, Woodhead Publishing Limited, Cambridge, England, 1994
Prerequisites / Notice1) Laboratory Tours and Demonstrations: Empa Structural Engineering Laboratory including Smart Composites, Shape Memory Alloys, Large Scale Testing of Structural Components
2) Working with Composite Materials in the Laboratory (application, testing, etc)
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