Das Herbstsemester 2020 findet in einer gemischten Form aus Online- und Präsenzunterricht statt.
Bitte lesen Sie die publizierten Informationen zu den einzelnen Lehrveranstaltungen genau.

Suchergebnis: Katalogdaten im Herbstsemester 2018

Data Science Master Information
Kernfächer
Datenanalyse
Information and Learning
NummerTitelTypECTSUmfangDozierende
252-0535-00LAdvanced Machine Learning Information W8 KP3V + 2U + 2AJ. M. Buhmann
KurzbeschreibungMachine learning algorithms provide analytical methods to search data sets for characteristic patterns. Typical tasks include the classification of data, function fitting and clustering, with applications in image and speech analysis, bioinformatics and exploratory data analysis. This course is accompanied by practical machine learning projects.
LernzielStudents will be familiarized with advanced concepts and algorithms for supervised and unsupervised learning; reinforce the statistics knowledge which is indispensible to solve modeling problems under uncertainty. Key concepts are the generalization ability of algorithms and systematic approaches to modeling and regularization. Machine learning projects will provide an opportunity to test the machine learning algorithms on real world data.
InhaltThe theory of fundamental machine learning concepts is presented in the lecture, and illustrated with relevant applications. Students can deepen their understanding by solving both pen-and-paper and programming exercises, where they implement and apply famous algorithms to real-world data.

Topics covered in the lecture include:

Fundamentals:
What is data?
Bayesian Learning
Computational learning theory

Supervised learning:
Ensembles: Bagging and Boosting
Max Margin methods
Neural networks

Unsupservised learning:
Dimensionality reduction techniques
Clustering
Mixture Models
Non-parametric density estimation
Learning Dynamical Systems
SkriptNo lecture notes, but slides will be made available on the course webpage.
LiteraturC. Bishop. Pattern Recognition and Machine Learning. Springer 2007.

R. Duda, P. Hart, and D. Stork. Pattern Classification. John Wiley &
Sons, second edition, 2001.

T. Hastie, R. Tibshirani, and J. Friedman. The Elements of Statistical
Learning: Data Mining, Inference and Prediction. Springer, 2001.

L. Wasserman. All of Statistics: A Concise Course in Statistical
Inference. Springer, 2004.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesThe course requires solid basic knowledge in analysis, statistics and numerical methods for CSE as well as practical programming experience for solving assignments.
Students should have followed at least "Introduction to Machine Learning" or an equivalent course offered by another institution.
Statistics
NummerTitelTypECTSUmfangDozierende
401-3621-00LFundamentals of Mathematical Statistics Information W10 KP4V + 1US. van de Geer
KurzbeschreibungThe course covers the basics of inferential statistics.
Lernziel
Datenmanagement und Datenverarbeitung
NummerTitelTypECTSUmfangDozierende
263-3010-00LBig Data Information Belegung eingeschränkt - Details anzeigen W8 KP3V + 2U + 2AG. Fourny
KurzbeschreibungThe key challenge of the information society is to turn data into information, information into knowledge, knowledge into value. This has become increasingly complex. Data comes in larger volumes, diverse shapes, from different sources. Data is more heterogeneous and less structured than forty years ago. Nevertheless, it still needs to be processed fast, with support for complex operations.
LernzielThis combination of requirements, together with the technologies that have emerged in order to address them, is typically referred to as "Big Data." This revolution has led to a completely new way to do business, e.g., develop new products and business models, but also to do science -- which is sometimes referred to as data-driven science or the "fourth paradigm".

Unfortunately, the quantity of data produced and available -- now in the Zettabyte range (that's 21 zeros) per year -- keeps growing faster than our ability to process it. Hence, new architectures and approaches for processing it were and are still needed. Harnessing them must involve a deep understanding of data not only in the large, but also in the small.

The field of databases evolves at a fast pace. In order to be prepared, to the extent possible, to the (r)evolutions that will take place in the next few decades, the emphasis of the lecture will be on the paradigms and core design ideas, while today's technologies will serve as supporting illustrations thereof.

After visiting this lecture, you should have gained an overview and understanding of the Big Data landscape, which is the basis on which one can make informed decisions, i.e., pick and orchestrate the relevant technologies together for addressing each business use case efficiently and consistently.
InhaltThis course gives an overview of database technologies and of the most important database design principles that lay the foundations of the Big Data universe. The material is organized along three axes: data in the large, data in the small, data in the very small. A broad range of aspects is covered with a focus on how they fit all together in the big picture of the Big Data ecosystem.

- physical storage: distributed file systems (HDFS), object storage(S3), key-value stores

- logical storage: document stores (MongoDB), column stores (HBase), graph databases (neo4j), data warehouses (ROLAP)

- data formats and syntaxes (XML, JSON, RDF, Turtle, CSV, XBRL, YAML, protocol buffers, Avro)

- data shapes and models (tables, trees, graphs, cubes)

- type systems and schemas: atomic types, structured types (arrays, maps), set-based type systems (?, *, +)

- an overview of functional, declarative programming languages across data shapes (SQL, XQuery, JSONiq, Cypher, MDX)

- the most important query paradigms (selection, projection, joining, grouping, ordering, windowing)

- paradigms for parallel processing, two-stage (MapReduce) and DAG-based (Spark)

- resource management (YARN)

- what a data center is made of and why it matters (racks, nodes, ...)

- underlying architectures (internal machinery of HDFS, HBase, Spark, neo4j)

- optimization techniques (functional and declarative paradigms, query plans, rewrites, indexing)

- applications.

Large scale analytics and machine learning are outside of the scope of this course.
LiteraturPapers from scientific conferences and journals. References will be given as part of the course material during the semester.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesThis course, in the autumn semester, is only intended for:
- Computer Science students
- Data Science students
- CBB students with a Computer Science background

Mobility students in CS are also welcome and encouraged to attend. If you experience any issue while registering, please contact the study administration and you will be gladly added.

Another version of this course will be offered in Spring for students of other departments. However, if you would like to already start learning about databases now, a course worth taking as a preparation/good prequel to the Spring edition of Big Data is the "Information Systems for Engineers" course, offered this Fall for other departments as well, and introducing relational databases and SQL.
263-4500-10LAdvanced Algorithms (with Project) Information Belegung eingeschränkt - Details anzeigen
Only for Data Science MSc.
W8 KP2V + 2U + 2P + 1AM. Ghaffari, A. Krause
KurzbeschreibungThis is an advanced course on the design and analysis of algorithms, covering a range of topics and techniques not studied in typical introductory courses on algorithms.
LernzielThis course is intended to familiarize students with (some of) the main tools and techniques developed over the last 15-20 years in algorithm design, which are by now among the key ingredients used in developing efficient algorithms.
Inhaltthe lectures will cover a range of topics, including the following: graph sparsifications while preserving cuts or distances, various approximation algorithms techniques and concepts, metric embeddings and probabilistic tree embeddings, online algorithms, multiplicative weight updates, streaming algorithms, sketching algorithms, and a bried glance at MapReduce algorithms.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesThis course is designed for masters and doctoral students and it especially targets those interested in theoretical computer science, but it should also be accessible to last-year bachelor students.

Sufficient comfort with both (A) Algorithm Design & Analysis and (B) Probability & Concentrations. E.g., having passed the course Algorithms, Probability, and Computing (APC) is highly recommended, though not required formally. If you are not sure whether you're ready for this class or not, please consulte the instructor.
Wählbare Kernfächer
NummerTitelTypECTSUmfangDozierende
151-0563-01LDynamic Programming and Optimal Control Information W4 KP2V + 1UR. D'Andrea
KurzbeschreibungIntroduction to Dynamic Programming and Optimal Control.
LernzielCovers the fundamental concepts of Dynamic Programming & Optimal Control.
InhaltDynamic Programming Algorithm; Deterministic Systems and Shortest Path Problems; Infinite Horizon Problems, Bellman Equation; Deterministic Continuous-Time Optimal Control.
LiteraturDynamic Programming and Optimal Control by Dimitri P. Bertsekas, Vol. I, 3rd edition, 2005, 558 pages, hardcover.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesRequirements: Knowledge of advanced calculus, introductory probability theory, and matrix-vector algebra.
252-0417-00LRandomized Algorithms and Probabilistic MethodsW8 KP3V + 2U + 2AA. Steger
KurzbeschreibungLas Vegas & Monte Carlo algorithms; inequalities of Markov, Chebyshev, Chernoff; negative correlation; Markov chains: convergence, rapidly mixing; generating functions; Examples include: min cut, median, balls and bins, routing in hypercubes, 3SAT, card shuffling, random walks
LernzielAfter this course students will know fundamental techniques from probabilistic combinatorics for designing randomized algorithms and will be able to apply them to solve typical problems in these areas.
InhaltRandomized Algorithms are algorithms that "flip coins" to take certain decisions. This concept extends the classical model of deterministic algorithms and has become very popular and useful within the last twenty years. In many cases, randomized algorithms are faster, simpler or just more elegant than deterministic ones. In the course, we will discuss basic principles and techniques and derive from them a number of randomized methods for problems in different areas.
SkriptYes.
Literatur- Randomized Algorithms, Rajeev Motwani and Prabhakar Raghavan, Cambridge University Press (1995)
- Probability and Computing, Michael Mitzenmacher and Eli Upfal, Cambridge University Press (2005)
252-1414-00LSystem Security Information W5 KP2V + 2US. Capkun, A. Perrig
KurzbeschreibungThe first part of the lecture covers individual system aspects starting with tamperproof or tamper-resistant hardware in general over operating system related security mechanisms to application software systems, such as host based intrusion detection systems. In the second part, the focus is on system design and methodologies for building secure systems.
LernzielIn this lecture, students learn about the security requirements and capabilities that are expected from modern hardware, operating systems, and other software environments. An overview of available technologies, algorithms and standards is given, with which these requirements can be met.
InhaltThe first part of the lecture covers individual system's aspects starting with tamperproof or tamperresistant hardware in general over operating system related security mechanisms to application software systems such as host based intrusion detetction systems. The main topics covered are: tamper resistant hardware, CPU support for security, protection mechanisms in the kernel, file system security (permissions / ACLs / network filesystem issues), IPC Security, mechanisms in more modern OS, such as Capabilities and Zones, Libraries and Software tools for security assurance, etc.

In the second part, the focus is on system design and methodologies for building secure systems. Topics include: patch management, common software faults (buffer overflows, etc.), writing secure software (design, architecture, QA, testing), compiler-supported security, language-supported security, logging and auditing (BSM audit, dtrace, ...), cryptographic support, and trustworthy computing (TCG, SGX).

Along the lectures, model cases will be elaborated and evaluated in the exercises.
261-5130-00LResearch in Data ScienceW6 KP13AProfessor/innen
KurzbeschreibungIndependent work under the supervision of a core or adjunct faculty of data science.
LernzielIndependent work under the supervision of a core or adjunct faculty of data science.
An approval of the director of studies is required for a non DS professor.
InhaltProject done under supervision of an approved professor.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesOnly students who have passed at least one core course in Data Management and Processing, and one core course in Data Analysis can start with a research project.

A project description must be submitted at the start of the project to the studies administration.
263-0006-00LAlgorithms Lab
Only for master students, otherwise a special permission by the student administration of D-INFK is required.
W8 KP4P + 3AA. Steger, E. Welzl, P. Widmayer
KurzbeschreibungStudents learn how to solve algorithmic problems given by a textual description (understanding problem setting, finding appropriate modeling, choosing suitable algorithms, and implementing them). Knowledge of basic algorithms and data structures is assumed; more advanced material and usage of standard libraries for combinatorial algorithms are introduced in tutorials.
LernzielThe objective of this course is to learn how to solve algorithmic problems given by a textual description. This includes appropriate problem modeling, choice of suitable (combinatorial) algorithms, and implementing them (using C/C++, STL, CGAL, and BGL).
LiteraturT. Cormen, C. Leiserson, R. Rivest: Introduction to Algorithms, MIT Press, 1990.
J. Hromkovic, Teubner: Theoretische Informatik, Springer, 2004 (English: Theoretical Computer Science, Springer 2003).
J. Kleinberg, É. Tardos: Algorithm Design, Addison Wesley, 2006.
H. R. Lewis, C. H. Papadimitriou: Elements of the Theory of Computation, Prentice Hall, 1998.
T. Ottmann, P. Widmayer: Algorithmen und Datenstrukturen, Spektrum, 2012.
R. Sedgewick: Algorithms in C++: Graph Algorithms, Addison-Wesley, 2001.
263-0007-00LAdvanced Systems Lab Information
Only for master students, otherwise a special permission by the student administration of D-INFK is required.
W8 KP4P + 3AG. Alonso
KurzbeschreibungThe goal of this course is to teach students how to evaluate the performance of complex computer and software systems. Accordingly, the methodology to carry out experiments and measurements is studied.
Furthermore, the modelling of systems with the help of queueing network systems is explained.
LernzielThe goal of this course is to teach students how to evaluate the performance of complex computer and software systems.
263-2400-00LReliable and Interpretable Artificial Intelligence Information W4 KP2V + 1UM. Vechev
KurzbeschreibungCreating reliable and explainable probabilistic models is a fundamental challenge to solving the artificial intelligence problem. This course covers some of the latest and most exciting advances that bring us closer to constructing such models.
LernzielThe main objective of this course is to expose students to the latest and most exciting research in the area of explainable and interpretable artificial intelligence, a topic of fundamental and increasing importance. Upon completion of the course, the students should have mastered the underlying methods and be able to apply them to a variety of problems.

To facilitate deeper understanding, an important part of the course will be a group hands-on programming project where students will build a system based on the learned material.
InhaltThe course covers the following inter-connected directions.

Part I: Robust and Explainable Deep Learning
-------------------------------------------------------------

Deep learning technology has made impressive advances in recent years. Despite this progress however, the fundamental challenge with deep learning remains that of understanding what a trained neural network has actually learned, and how stable that solution is. Forr example: is the network stable to slight perturbations of the input (e.g., an image)? How easy it is to fool the network into mis-classifying obvious inputs? Can we guide the network in a manner beyond simple labeled data?

Topics:
- Attacks: Finding adversarial examples via state-of-the-art attacks (e.g., FGSM, PGD attacks).
- Defenses: Automated methods and tools which guarantee robustness of deep nets (e.g., using abstract domains, mixed-integer solvers)
- Combing differentiable logic with gradient-based methods so to train networks to satisfy richer properties.
- Frameworks: AI2, DiffAI, Reluplex, DQL, DeepPoly, etc.

Part II: Program Synthesis/Induction
------------------------------------------------

Synthesis is a new frontier in AI where the computer programs itself via user provided examples. Synthesis has significant applications for non-programmers as well as for programmers where it can provide massive productivity increase (e.g., wrangling for data scientists). Modern synthesis techniques excel at learning functions over discrete spaces from (partial) intent. There have been a number of recent, exciting breakthroughs in techniques that discover complex, interpretable/explainable functions from few examples, partial sketches and other forms of supervision.

Topics:
- Theory of program synthesis: version spaces, counter-example guided inductive synthesis (CEGIS) with SAT/SMT, lower bounds on learning.
- Applications of techniques: synthesis for end users (e.g., spreadsheets) and data analytics.
- Combining synthesis with learning: application to learning from code.
- Frameworks: PHOG, DeepCode.

Part III: Probabilistic Programming
----------------------------------------------

Probabilistic programming is an emerging direction, recently also pushed by various companies (e.g., Facebook, Uber, Google) whose goal is democratize the construction of probabilistic models. In probabilistic programming, the user specifies a model while inference is left to the underlying solver. The idea is that the higher level of abstraction makes it easier to express, understand and reason about probabilistic models.

Topics:

- Probabilistic Inference: sampling based, exact symbolic inference, semantics
- Applications of probabilistic programming: bias in deep learning, differential privacy (connects to Part I).
- Frameworks: PSI, Edward2, Venture.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesThe course material is self-contained: needed background is covered in the lectures and exercises, and additional pointers.
263-2800-00LDesign of Parallel and High-Performance Computing Information W7 KP3V + 2U + 1AT. Hoefler, M. Püschel
KurzbeschreibungAdvanced topics in parallel / concurrent programming.
LernzielUnderstand concurrency paradigms and models from a higher perspective and acquire skills for designing, structuring and developing possibly large concurrent software systems. Become able to distinguish parallelism in problem space and in machine space. Become familiar with important technical concepts and with concurrency folklore.
263-3210-00LDeep Learning Information Belegung eingeschränkt - Details anzeigen
Maximale Teilnehmerzahl: 300
W4 KP2V + 1UF. Perez Cruz
KurzbeschreibungDeep learning is an area within machine learning that deals with algorithms and models that automatically induce multi-level data representations.
LernzielIn recent years, deep learning and deep networks have significantly improved the state-of-the-art in many application domains such as computer vision, speech recognition, and natural language processing. This class will cover the mathematical foundations of deep learning and provide insights into model design, training, and validation. The main objective is a profound understanding of why these methods work and how. There will also be a rich set of hands-on tasks and practical projects to familiarize students with this emerging technology.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesThis is an advanced level course that requires some basic background in machine learning. More importantly, students are expected to have a very solid mathematical foundation, including linear algebra, multivariate calculus, and probability. The course will make heavy use of mathematics and is not (!) meant to be an extended tutorial of how to train deep networks with tools like Torch or Tensorflow, although that may be a side benefit.

The participation in the course is subject to the following conditions:
1) The number of participants is limited to 300 students (MSc and PhDs).
2) Students must have taken the exam in Machine Learning (252-0535-00) or have acquired equivalent knowledge, see exhaustive list below:

Machine Learning
https://ml2.inf.ethz.ch/courses/ml/

Computational Intelligence Lab
http://da.inf.ethz.ch/teaching/2018/CIL/

Learning and Intelligent Systems/Introduction to Machine Learning
https://las.inf.ethz.ch/teaching/introml-S18

Statistical Learning Theory
http://ml2.inf.ethz.ch/courses/slt/

Computational Statistics
https://stat.ethz.ch/lectures/ss18/comp-stats.php

Probabilistic Artificial Intelligence
https://las.inf.ethz.ch/teaching/pai-f17

Data Mining: Learning from Large Data Sets
https://las.inf.ethz.ch/teaching/dm-f17
263-5210-00LProbabilistic Artificial Intelligence Information W4 KP2V + 1UA. Krause
KurzbeschreibungThis course introduces core modeling techniques and algorithms from statistics, optimization, planning, and control and study applications in areas such as sensor networks, robotics, and the Internet.
LernzielHow can we build systems that perform well in uncertain environments and unforeseen situations? How can we develop systems that exhibit "intelligent" behavior, without prescribing explicit rules? How can we build systems that learn from experience in order to improve their performance? We will study core modeling techniques and algorithms from statistics, optimization, planning, and control and study applications in areas such as sensor networks, robotics, and the Internet. The course is designed for upper-level undergraduate and graduate students.
InhaltTopics covered:
- Search (BFS, DFS, A*), constraint satisfaction and optimization
- Tutorial in logic (propositional, first-order)
- Probability
- Bayesian Networks (models, exact and approximative inference, learning) - Temporal models (Hidden Markov Models, Dynamic Bayesian Networks)
- Probabilistic palnning (MDPs, POMPDPs)
- Reinforcement learning
- Combining logic and probability
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesSolid basic knowledge in statistics, algorithms and programming
263-5902-00LComputer Vision Information W6 KP3V + 1U + 1AM. Pollefeys, V. Ferrari, L. Van Gool
KurzbeschreibungThe goal of this course is to provide students with a good understanding of computer vision and image analysis techniques. The main concepts and techniques will be studied in depth and practical algorithms and approaches will be discussed and explored through the exercises.
LernzielThe objectives of this course are:
1. To introduce the fundamental problems of computer vision.
2. To introduce the main concepts and techniques used to solve those.
3. To enable participants to implement solutions for reasonably complex problems.
4. To enable participants to make sense of the computer vision literature.
InhaltCamera models and calibration, invariant features, Multiple-view geometry, Model fitting, Stereo Matching, Segmentation, 2D Shape matching, Shape from Silhouettes, Optical flow, Structure from motion, Tracking, Object recognition, Object category recognition
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesIt is recommended that students have taken the Visual Computing lecture or a similar course introducing basic image processing concepts before taking this course.
401-0625-01LApplied Analysis of Variance and Experimental Design Information W5 KP2V + 1UL. Meier
KurzbeschreibungPrinciples of experimental design, one-way analysis of variance, contrasts and multiple comparisons, multi-factor designs and analysis of variance, complete block designs, Latin square designs, random effects and mixed effects models, split-plot designs, incomplete block designs, two-series factorials and fractional designs, power.
LernzielParticipants will be able to plan and analyze efficient experiments in the fields of natural sciences. They will gain practical experience by using the software R.
InhaltPrinciples of experimental design, one-way analysis of variance, contrasts and multiple comparisons, multi-factor designs and analysis of variance, complete block designs, Latin square designs, random effects and mixed effects models, split-plot designs, incomplete block designs, two-series factorials and fractional designs, power.
LiteraturG. Oehlert: A First Course in Design and Analysis of Experiments, W.H. Freeman and Company, New York, 2000.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesThe exercises, but also the classes will be based on procedures from the freely available, open-source statistical software R, for which an introduction will be held.
401-3054-14LProbabilistic Methods in Combinatorics Information W6 KP2V + 1UB. Sudakov
KurzbeschreibungThis course provides a gentle introduction to the Probabilistic Method, with an emphasis on methodology. We will try to illustrate the main ideas by showing the application of probabilistic reasoning to various combinatorial problems.
Lernziel
InhaltThe topics covered in the class will include (but are not limited to): linearity of expectation, the second moment method, the local lemma, correlation inequalities, martingales, large deviation inequalities, Janson and Talagrand inequalities and pseudo-randomness.
Literatur- The Probabilistic Method, by N. Alon and J. H. Spencer, 3rd Edition, Wiley, 2008.
- Random Graphs, by B. Bollobás, 2nd Edition, Cambridge University Press, 2001.
- Random Graphs, by S. Janson, T. Luczak and A. Rucinski, Wiley, 2000.
- Graph Coloring and the Probabilistic Method, by M. Molloy and B. Reed, Springer, 2002.
401-3601-00LProbability Theory Information
Höchstens eines der drei Bachelor-Kernfächer
401-3461-00L Funktionalanalysis I / Functional Analysis I
401-3531-00L Differentialgeometrie I / Differential Geometry I
401-3601-00L Wahrscheinlichkeitstheorie / Probability Theory
ist im Master-Studiengang Mathematik anrechenbar.
W10 KP4V + 1UA.‑S. Sznitman
KurzbeschreibungBasics of probability theory and the theory of stochastic processes in discrete time
LernzielThis course presents the basics of probability theory and the theory of stochastic processes in discrete time. The following topics are planned:
Basics in measure theory, random series, law of large numbers, weak convergence, characteristic functions, central limit theorem, conditional expectation, martingales, convergence theorems for martingales, Galton Watson chain, transition probability, Theorem of Ionescu Tulcea, Markov chains.
InhaltThis course presents the basics of probability theory and the theory of stochastic processes in discrete time. The following topics are planned:
Basics in measure theory, random series, law of large numbers, weak convergence, characteristic functions, central limit theorem, conditional expectation, martingales, convergence theorems for martingales, Galton Watson chain, transition probability, Theorem of Ionescu Tulcea, Markov chains.
Skriptavailable, will be sold in the course
LiteraturR. Durrett, Probability: Theory and examples, Duxbury Press 1996
H. Bauer, Probability Theory, de Gruyter 1996
J. Jacod and P. Protter, Probability essentials, Springer 2004
A. Klenke, Wahrscheinlichkeitstheorie, Springer 2006
D. Williams, Probability with martingales, Cambridge University Press 1991
401-3612-00LStochastic SimulationW5 KP3GF. Sigrist
KurzbeschreibungThis course provides an introduction to statistical Monte Carlo methods. This includes applications of simulations in various fields (Bayesian statistics, statistical mechanics, operations research, financial mathematics), algorithms for the generation of random variables (accept-reject, importance sampling), estimating the precision, variance reduction, introduction to Markov chain Monte Carlo.
LernzielStochastic simulation (also called Monte Carlo method) is the experimental analysis of a stochastic model by implementing it on a computer. Probabilities and expected values can be approximated by averaging simulated values, and the central limit theorem gives an estimate of the error of this approximation. The course shows examples of the many applications of stochastic simulation and explains different algorithms used for simulation. These algorithms are illustrated with the statistical software R.
InhaltExamples of simulations in different fields (computer science, statistics, statistical mechanics, operations research, financial mathematics). Generation of uniform random variables. Generation of random variables with arbitrary distributions (quantile transform, accept-reject, importance sampling), simulation of Gaussian processes and diffusions. The precision of simulations, methods for variance reduction. Introduction to Markov chains and Markov chain Monte Carlo (Metropolis-Hastings, Gibbs sampler, Hamiltonian Monte Carlo, reversible jump MCMC).
SkriptA script will be available in English.
LiteraturP. Glasserman, Monte Carlo Methods in Financial Engineering.
Springer 2004.

B. D. Ripley. Stochastic Simulation. Wiley, 1987.

Ch. Robert, G. Casella. Monte Carlo Statistical Methods.
Springer 2004 (2nd edition).
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesFamiliarity with basic concepts of probability theory (random variables, joint and conditional distributions, laws of large numbers and central limit theorem) will be assumed.
401-3627-00LHigh-Dimensional Statistics
Findet dieses Semester nicht statt.
W4 KP2VP. L. Bühlmann
Kurzbeschreibung"High-Dimensional Statistics" deals with modern methods and theory for statistical inference when the number of unknown parameters is of much larger order than sample size. Statistical estimation and algorithms for complex models and aspects of multiple testing will be discussed.
LernzielKnowledge of methods and basic theory for high-dimensional statistical inference
InhaltLasso and Group Lasso for high-dimensional linear and generalized linear models; Additive models and many smooth univariate functions; Non-convex loss functions and l1-regularization; Stability selection, multiple testing and construction of p-values; Undirected graphical modeling
LiteraturPeter Bühlmann and Sara van de Geer (2011). Statistics for High-Dimensional Data: Methods, Theory and Applications. Springer Verlag.
ISBN 978-3-642-20191-2.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesKnowledge of basic concepts in probability theory, and intermediate knowledge of statistics (e.g. a course in linear models or computational statistics).
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