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Suchergebnis: Katalogdaten im Frühjahrssemester 2019

Data Science Master Information
Kernfächer
Datenanalyse
Information and Learning
NummerTitelTypECTSUmfangDozierende
227-0434-10LMathematics of Information Information W8 KP3V + 2U + 2AH. Bölcskei
KurzbeschreibungThe class focuses on fundamental aspects of mathematical information science: Frame theory, sampling theory, sparsity, compressed sensing, uncertainty relations, spectrum-blind sampling, dimensionality reduction and sketching, randomized algorithms for large-scale sparse FFTs, inverse problems, (Kolmogorov) approximation theory, and information theory (lossless and lossy compression).
LernzielAfter attending this lecture, participating in the exercise sessions, and working on the homework problem sets, students will have acquired a working knowledge of the most commonly used mathematical theories in information science. Students will also have to carry out a research project, either individually or in groups, with presentations at the end of the semester.
Inhalt1. Signal representations: Frames in finite-dimensional spaces, frames in Hilbert spaces, wavelets, Gabor expansions

2. Sampling theorems: The sampling theorem as a frame expansion, irregular sampling, multi-band sampling, density theorems, spectrum-blind sampling

3. Sparsity and compressed sensing: Uncertainty relations in sparse signal recovery, recovery algorithms, Lasso, matching pursuit algorithms, compressed sensing, super-resolution

4. High-dimensional data and dimensionality reduction: Random projections, the Johnson-Lindenstrauss Lemma, sketching

5. Randomized algorithms for large-scale sparse FFTs

6. Approximation theory: Fundamental limits on compressibility of signal classes, Kolmogorov epsilon-entropy of signal classes, optimal encoding and decoding of signal classes

7. Information theory: Entropy, mutual information, lossy compression, rate-distortion theory, lossless compression, arithmetic coding, Lempel-Ziv compression
SkriptDetailed lecture notes will be provided at the beginning of the semester.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesThis course is aimed at students with a background in basic linear algebra, analysis, and probability. We will, however, review required mathematical basics throughout the semester in the exercise sessions.
Statistics
NummerTitelTypECTSUmfangDozierende
401-3632-00LComputational StatisticsW8 KP3V + 1UM. H. Maathuis
KurzbeschreibungWe discuss modern statistical methods for data analysis, including methods for data exploration, prediction and inference. We pay attention to algorithmic aspects, theoretical properties and practical considerations. The class is hands-on and methods are applied using the statistical programming language R.
LernzielThe student obtains an overview of modern statistical methods for data analysis, including their algorithmic aspects and theoretical properties. The methods are applied using the statistical programming language R.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesAt least one semester of (basic) probability and statistics.

Programming experience is helpful but not required.
Datenmanagement und Datenverarbeitung
NummerTitelTypECTSUmfangDozierende
261-5110-00LOptimization for Data Science Information W8 KP3V + 2U + 2AB. Gärtner, D. Steurer
KurzbeschreibungThis course teaches an overview of modern optimization methods, with applications in particular for machine learning and data science.
LernzielUnderstanding the theoretical and practical aspects of relevant optimization methods used in data science. Learning general paradigms to deal with optimization problems arising in data science.
InhaltThis course teaches an overview of modern optimization methods, with applications in particular for machine learning and data science.

In the first part of the course, we will discuss how classical first and second order methods such as gradient descent and Newton's method can be adapated to scale to large datasets, in theory and in practice. We also cover some new algorithms and paradigms that have been developed specifically in the context of data science. The emphasis is not so much on the application of these methods (many of which are covered in other courses), but on understanding and analyzing the methods themselves.

In the second part, we discuss convex programming relaxations as a powerful and versatile paradigm for designing efficient algorithms to solve computational problems arising in data science. We will learn about this paradigm and develop a unified perspective on it through the lens of the sum-of-squares semidefinite programming hierarchy. As applications, we are discussing non-negative matrix factorization, compressed sensing and sparse linear regression, matrix completion and phase retrieval, as well as robust estimation.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesAs background, we require material taught in the course "252-0209-00L Algorithms, Probability, and Computing". It is not necessary that participants have actually taken the course, but they should be prepared to catch up if necessary.
Wählbare Kernfächer
NummerTitelTypECTSUmfangDozierende
151-0566-00LRecursive Estimation Information W4 KP2V + 1UR. D'Andrea
KurzbeschreibungEstimation of the state of a dynamic system based on a model and observations in a computationally efficient way.
LernzielLearn the basic recursive estimation methods and their underlying principles.
InhaltIntroduction to state estimation; probability review; Bayes' theorem; Bayesian tracking; extracting estimates from probability distributions; Kalman filter; extended Kalman filter; particle filter; observer-based control and the separation principle.
SkriptLecture notes available on course website: http://www.idsc.ethz.ch/education/lectures/recursive-estimation.html
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesRequirements: Introductory probability theory and matrix-vector algebra.
227-0150-00LSystems-on-chip for Data Analytics and Machine Learning Information
Previously "Energy-Efficient Parallel Computing Systems for Data Analytics"
W6 KP4GL. Benini
KurzbeschreibungSystems-on-chip architecture and related design issues with a focus on machine learning and data analytics applications. It will cover multi-cores, many-cores, vector engines, GP-GPUs, application-specific processors and heterogeneous compute accelerators. Special emphasis given to energy-efficiency issues and hardware-software techniques for power and energy minimization.
LernzielGive in-depth understanding of the links and dependencies between architectures and their energy-efficient implementation and to get a comprehensive exposure to state-of-the-art systems-on-chip platforms for machine learning and data analytics. Practical experience will also be gained through practical exercises and mini-projects (hardware and software) assigned on specific topics.
InhaltThe course will cover advanced system-on-chip architectures, with an in-depth view on design challenges related to advanced silicon technology and state-of-the-art system integration options (nanometer silicon technology, novel storage devices, three-dimensional integration, advanced system packaging). The emphasis will be on programmable parallel architectures with application focus on machine learning and data analytics. The main SoC architectural families will be covered: namely, multi and many- cores, GPUs, vector accelerators, application-specific processors, heterogeneous platforms. The course will cover the complex design choices required to achieve scalability and energy proportionality. The course will will also delve into system design, touching on hardware-software tradeoffs and full-system analysis and optimization taking into account non-functional constraints and quality metrics, such as power consumption, thermal dissipation, reliability and variability. The application focus will be on machine learning both in the cloud and at the edges (near-sensor analytics).
SkriptSlides will be provided to accompany lectures. Pointers to scientific literature will be given. Exercise scripts and tutorials will be provided.
LiteraturJohn L. Hennessy, David A. Patterson, Computer Architecture: A Quantitative Approach (The Morgan Kaufmann Series in Computer Architecture and Design) 6th Edition, 2017.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesKnowledge of digital design at the level of "Design of Digital Circuits SS12" is required.

Knowledge of basic VLSI design at the level of "VLSI I: Architectures of VLSI Circuits" is required
227-0420-00LInformation Theory II Information W6 KP2V + 2UA. Lapidoth, S. M. Moser
KurzbeschreibungThis course builds on Information Theory I. It introduces additional topics in single-user communication, connections between Information Theory and Statistics, and Network Information Theory.
LernzielThe course has two objectives: to introduce the students to the key information theoretic results that underlay the design of communication systems and to equip the students with the tools that are needed to conduct research in Information Theory.
InhaltDifferential entropy, maximum entropy, the Gaussian channel and water filling, the entropy-power inequality, Sanov's Theorem, Fisher information, the broadcast channel, the multiple-access channel, Slepian-Wolf coding, and the Gelfand-Pinsker problem.
Skriptn/a
LiteraturT.M. Cover and J.A. Thomas, Elements of Information Theory, second edition, Wiley 2006
227-0558-00LPrinciples of Distributed Computing Information W6 KP2V + 2U + 1AR. Wattenhofer, M. Ghaffari
KurzbeschreibungWe study the fundamental issues underlying the design of distributed systems: communication, coordination, fault-tolerance, locality, parallelism, self-organization, symmetry breaking, synchronization, uncertainty. We explore essential algorithmic ideas and lower bound techniques.
LernzielDistributed computing is essential in modern computing and communications systems. Examples are on the one hand large-scale networks such as the Internet, and on the other hand multiprocessors such as your new multi-core laptop. This course introduces the principles of distributed computing, emphasizing the fundamental issues underlying the design of distributed systems and networks: communication, coordination, fault-tolerance, locality, parallelism, self-organization, symmetry breaking, synchronization, uncertainty. We explore essential algorithmic ideas and lower bound techniques, basically the "pearls" of distributed computing. We will cover a fresh topic every week.
InhaltDistributed computing models and paradigms, e.g. message passing, shared memory, synchronous vs. asynchronous systems, time and message complexity, peer-to-peer systems, small-world networks, social networks, sorting networks, wireless communication, and self-organizing systems.

Distributed algorithms, e.g. leader election, coloring, covering, packing, decomposition, spanning trees, mutual exclusion, store and collect, arrow, ivy, synchronizers, diameter, all-pairs-shortest-path, wake-up, and lower bounds
SkriptAvailable. Our course script is used at dozens of other universities around the world.
LiteraturLecture Notes By Roger Wattenhofer. These lecture notes are taught at about a dozen different universities through the world.

Distributed Computing: Fundamentals, Simulations and Advanced Topics
Hagit Attiya, Jennifer Welch.
McGraw-Hill Publishing, 1998, ISBN 0-07-709352 6

Introduction to Algorithms
Thomas Cormen, Charles Leiserson, Ronald Rivest.
The MIT Press, 1998, ISBN 0-262-53091-0 oder 0-262-03141-8

Disseminatin of Information in Communication Networks
Juraj Hromkovic, Ralf Klasing, Andrzej Pelc, Peter Ruzicka, Walter Unger.
Springer-Verlag, Berlin Heidelberg, 2005, ISBN 3-540-00846-2

Introduction to Parallel Algorithms and Architectures: Arrays, Trees, Hypercubes
Frank Thomson Leighton.
Morgan Kaufmann Publishers Inc., San Francisco, CA, 1991, ISBN 1-55860-117-1

Distributed Computing: A Locality-Sensitive Approach
David Peleg.
Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (SIAM), 2000, ISBN 0-89871-464-8
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesCourse pre-requisites: Interest in algorithmic problems. (No particular course needed.)
252-0211-00LInformation Security Information W8 KP4V + 3UD. Basin, S. Capkun, E. Mohammadi
KurzbeschreibungThis course provides an introduction to Information Security. The focus
is on fundamental concepts and models, basic cryptography, protocols and system security, and privacy and data protection. While the emphasis is on foundations, case studies will be given that examine different realizations of these ideas in practice.
LernzielMaster fundamental concepts in Information Security and their
application to system building. (See objectives listed below for more details).
Inhalt1. Introduction and Motivation (OBJECTIVE: Broad conceptual overview of information security) Motivation: implications of IT on society/economy, Classical security problems, Approaches to
defining security and security goals, Abstractions, assumptions, and trust, Risk management and the human factor, Course verview. 2. Foundations of Cryptography (OBJECTIVE: Understand basic
cryptographic mechanisms and applications) Introduction, Basic concepts in cryptography: Overview, Types of Security, computational hardness, Abstraction of channel security properties, Symmetric
encryption, Hash functions, Message authentication codes, Public-key distribution, Public-key cryptosystems, Digital signatures, Application case studies, Comparison of encryption at different layers, VPN, SSL, Digital payment systems, blind signatures, e-cash, Time stamping 3. Key Management and Public-key Infrastructures (OBJECTIVE: Understand the basic mechanisms relevant in an Internet context) Key management in distributed systems, Exact characterization of requirements, the role of trust, Public-key Certificates, Public-key Infrastructures, Digital evidence and non-repudiation, Application case studies, Kerberos, X.509, PGP. 4. Security Protocols (OBJECTIVE: Understand network-oriented security, i.e.. how to employ building blocks to secure applications in (open) networks) Introduction, Requirements/properties, Establishing shared secrets, Principal and message origin authentication, Environmental assumptions, Dolev-Yao intruder model and
variants, Illustrative examples, Formal models and reasoning, Trace-based interleaving semantics, Inductive verification, or model-checking for falsification, Techniques for protocol design,
Application case study 1: from Needham-Schroeder Shared-Key to Kerberos, Application case study 2: from DH to IKE. 5. Access Control and Security Policies (OBJECTIVES: Study system-oriented security, i.e., policies, models, and mechanisms) Motivation (relationship to CIA, relationship to Crypto) and examples Concepts: policies versus models versus mechanisms, DAC and MAC, Modeling formalism, Access Control Matrix Model, Roll Based Access Control, Bell-LaPadula, Harrison-Ruzzo-Ullmann, Information flow, Chinese Wall, Biba, Clark-Wilson, System mechanisms: Operating Systems, Hardware Security Features, Reference Monitors, File-system protection, Application case studies 6. Anonymity and Privacy (OBJECTIVE: examine protection goals beyond standard CIA and corresponding mechanisms) Motivation and Definitions, Privacy, policies and policy languages, mechanisms, problems, Anonymity: simple mechanisms (pseudonyms, proxies), Application case studies: mix networks and crowds. 7. Larger application case study: GSM, mobility
252-0526-00LStatistical Learning Theory Information W7 KP3V + 2U + 1AJ. M. Buhmann
KurzbeschreibungThe course covers advanced methods of statistical learning :
Statistical learning theory;variational methods and optimization, e.g., maximum entropy techniques, information bottleneck, deterministic and simulated annealing; clustering for vectorial, histogram and relational data; model selection; graphical models.
LernzielThe course surveys recent methods of statistical learning. The fundamentals of machine learning as presented in the course "Introduction to Machine Learning" are expanded and in particular, the theory of statistical learning is discussed.
Inhalt# Theory of estimators: How can we measure the quality of a statistical estimator? We already discussed bias and variance of estimators very briefly, but the interesting part is yet to come.

# Variational methods and optimization: We consider optimization approaches for problems where the optimizer is a probability distribution. Concepts we will discuss in this context include:

* Maximum Entropy
* Information Bottleneck
* Deterministic Annealing

# Clustering: The problem of sorting data into groups without using training samples. This requires a definition of ``similarity'' between data points and adequate optimization procedures.

# Model selection: We have already discussed how to fit a model to a data set in ML I, which usually involved adjusting model parameters for a given type of model. Model selection refers to the question of how complex the chosen model should be. As we already know, simple and complex models both have advantages and drawbacks alike.

# Statistical physics models: approaches for large systems approximate optimization, which originate in the statistical physics (free energy minimization applied to spin glasses and other models); sampling methods based on these models
SkriptA draft of a script will be provided;
transparencies of the lectures will be made available.
LiteraturHastie, Tibshirani, Friedman: The Elements of Statistical Learning, Springer, 2001.

L. Devroye, L. Gyorfi, and G. Lugosi: A probabilistic theory of pattern recognition. Springer, New York, 1996
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesRequirements:

knowledge of the Machine Learning course
basic knowledge of statistics, interest in statistical methods.

It is recommended that Introduction to Machine Learning (ML I) is taken first; but with a little extra effort Statistical Learning Theory can be followed without the introductory course.
252-0538-00LShape Modeling and Geometry Processing Information W5 KP2V + 1U + 1AO. Sorkine Hornung
KurzbeschreibungThis course covers some of the latest developments in geometric modeling and digital geometry processing. Topics include surface modeling based on polygonal meshes, mesh generation, surface reconstruction, mesh fairing and simplification, discrete differential geometry, interactive shape editing, topics in digital shape fabrication.
LernzielThe students will learn how to design, program and analyze algorithms and systems for interactive 3D shape modeling and digital geometry processing.
InhaltRecent advances in 3D digital geometry processing have created a plenitude of novel concepts for the mathematical representation and interactive manipulation of geometric models. This course covers some of the latest developments in geometric modeling and digital geometry processing. Topics include surface modeling based on triangle meshes, mesh generation, surface reconstruction, mesh fairing and simplification, discrete differential geometry, interactive shape editing and digital shape fabrication.
SkriptSlides and course notes
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesPrerequisites:
Visual Computing, Computer Graphics or an equivalent class. Experience with C++ programming. Solid background in linear algebra and analysis. Some knowledge of differential geometry, computational geometry and numerical methods is helpful but not a strict requirement.
252-0579-00L3D Vision Information W4 KP3GM. Pollefeys, V. Larsson
KurzbeschreibungThe course covers camera models and calibration, feature tracking and matching, camera motion estimation via simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM) and visual odometry (VO), epipolar and mult-view geometry, structure-from-motion, (multi-view) stereo, augmented reality, and image-based (re-)localization.
LernzielAfter attending this course, students will:
1. understand the core concepts for recovering 3D shape of objects and scenes from images and video.
2. be able to implement basic systems for vision-based robotics and simple virtual/augmented reality applications.
3. have a good overview over the current state-of-the art in 3D vision.
4. be able to critically analyze and asses current research in this area.
InhaltThe goal of this course is to teach the core techniques required for robotic and augmented reality applications: How to determine the motion of a camera and how to estimate the absolute position and orientation of a camera in the real world. This course will introduce the basic concepts of 3D Vision in the form of short lectures, followed by student presentations discussing the current state-of-the-art. The main focus of this course are student projects on 3D Vision topics, with an emphasis on robotic vision and virtual and augmented reality applications.
252-3005-00LNatural Language Understanding Information Belegung eingeschränkt - Details anzeigen
Number of participants limited to 200.
W4 KP2V + 1UM. Ciaramita, T. Hofmann
KurzbeschreibungThis course presents topics in natural language processing with an emphasis on modern techniques, primarily focusing on statistical and deep learning approaches. The course provides an overview of the primary areas of research in language processing as well as a detailed exploration of the models and techniques used both in research and in commercial natural language systems.
LernzielThe objective of the course is to learn the basic concepts in the statistical processing of natural languages. The course will be project-oriented so that the students can also gain hands-on experience with state-of-the-art tools and techniques.
InhaltThis course presents an introduction to general topics and techniques used in natural language processing today, primarily focusing on statistical approaches. The course provides an overview of the primary areas of research in language processing as well as a detailed exploration of the models and techniques used both in research and in commercial natural language systems.
LiteraturLectures will make use of textbooks such as the one by Jurafsky and Martin where appropriate, but will also make use of original research and survey papers.
261-5130-00LResearch in Data Science Belegung eingeschränkt - Details anzeigen
Only for Data Science MSc.
W6 KP13AProfessor/innen
KurzbeschreibungIndependent work under the supervision of a core or adjunct faculty of data science.
LernzielIndependent work under the supervision of a core or adjunct faculty of data science.
An approval of the director of studies is required for a non DS professor.
InhaltProject done under supervision of an approved professor.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesOnly students who have passed at least one core course in Data Management and Processing, and one core course in Data Analysis can start with a research project.

A project description must be submitted at the start of the project to the studies administration.
263-0008-00LComputational Intelligence Lab
Only for master students, otherwise a special permission by the study administration of D-INFK is required.
W8 KP2V + 2U + 3AT. Hofmann
KurzbeschreibungThis laboratory course teaches fundamental concepts in computational science and machine learning with a special emphasis on matrix factorization and representation learning. The class covers techniques like dimension reduction, data clustering, sparse coding, and deep learning as well as a wide spectrum of related use cases and applications.
LernzielStudents acquire fundamental theoretical concepts and methodologies from machine learning and how to apply these techniques to build intelligent systems that solve real-world problems. They learn to successfully develop solutions to application problems by following the key steps of modeling, algorithm design, implementation and experimental validation.

This lab course has a strong focus on practical assignments. Students work in groups of three to four people, to develop solutions to three application problems: 1. Collaborative filtering and recommender systems, 2. Text sentiment classification, and 3. Road segmentation in aerial imagery.

For each of these problems, students submit their solutions to an online evaluation and ranking system, and get feedback in terms of numerical accuracy and computational speed. In the final part of the course, students combine and extend one of their previous promising solutions, and write up their findings in an extended abstract in the style of a conference paper.

(Disclaimer: The offered projects may be subject to change from year to year.)
Inhaltsee course description
263-2300-00LHow To Write Fast Numerical Code Information Belegung eingeschränkt - Details anzeigen
Number of participants limited to 84.

Prerequisite: Master student, solid C programming skills.

Takes place the last time in this form.
W6 KP3V + 2UM. Püschel
KurzbeschreibungThis course introduces the student to the foundations and state-of-the-art techniques in developing high performance software for mathematical functionality such as matrix operations, transforms, and others. The focus is on optimizing for a single core. This includes optimizing for the memory hierarchy, for special instruction sets, and the possible use of automatic performance tuning.
LernzielSoftware performance (i.e., runtime) arises through the complex interaction of algorithm, its implementation, the compiler used, and the microarchitecture the program is run on. The first goal of the course is to provide the student with an understanding of this "vertical" interaction, and hence software performance, for mathematical functionality. The second goal is to teach a systematic strategy how to use this knowledge to write fast software for numerical problems. This strategy will be trained in several homeworks and a semester-long group project.
InhaltThe fast evolution and increasing complexity of computing platforms pose a major challenge for developers of high performance software for engineering, science, and consumer applications: it becomes increasingly harder to harness the available computing power. Straightforward implementations may lose as much as one or two orders of magnitude in performance. On the other hand, creating optimal implementations requires the developer to have an understanding of algorithms, capabilities and limitations of compilers, and the target platform's architecture and microarchitecture.

This interdisciplinary course introduces the student to the foundations and state-of-the-art techniques in high performance mathematical software development using important functionality such as matrix operations, transforms, filters, and others as examples. The course will explain how to optimize for the memory hierarchy, take advantage of special instruction sets, and other details of current processors that require optimization. The concept of automatic performance tuning is introduced. The focus is on optimization for a single core; thus, the course complements others on parallel and distributed computing.

Finally a general strategy for performance analysis and optimization is introduced that the students will apply in group projects that accompany the course.
263-2925-00LProgram Analysis for System Security and Reliability Information W5 KP2V + 1U + 1AM. Vechev
KurzbeschreibungSecurity breaches in modern systems (blockchains, datacenters, AI, etc.) result in billions of losses. We will cover key security issues and how the latest automated techniques can be used to prevent these. The course has a practical focus, also covering systems built by successful ETH Spin-offs (ChainSecurity.com and DeepCode.ai).

More info: https://www.sri.inf.ethz.ch/teaching/pass2019
Lernziel* Learn about security issues in modern systems -- blockchains, smart contracts, AI-based systems (e.g., autonomous cars), data centers -- and why they are challenging to address.

* Understand how the latest automated analysis techniques work, both discrete and probabilistic.

* Understand how these techniques combine with machine-learning methods, both supervised and unsupervised.

* Understand how to use these methods to build reliable and secure modern systems.

* Learn about new open problems that if solved can lead to research and commercial impact.
InhaltPart I: Security of Blockchains

- We will cover existing blockchains (e.g., Ethereum, Bitcoin), how they work, what the core security issues are, and how these have led to massive financial losses.
- We will show how to extract useful information about smart contracts and transactions using interactive analysis frameworks for querying blockchains (e.g. Google's Ethereum BigQuery).
- We will discuss the state-of-the-art security tools (e.g., https://securify.ch) for ensuring that smart contracts are free of security vulnerabilities.
- We will study the latest automated reasoning systems (e.g., Dagger) for checking custom (temporal) properties of smart contracts and illustrate their operation on real-world use cases.
- We will study the underlying methods for automated reasoning and testing (e.g., abstract interpretation, symbolic execution, fuzzing) are used to build such tools.

Part II: Machine Learning for Security

- We will discuss how machine learning models for structured prediction are used to address security tasks, including de-obfuscation of binaries (Debin: https://debin.ai), Android APKs (DeGuard: http://apk-deguard.com) and JavaScript (JSNice: http://jsnice.org).
- We will study to leverage program abstractions in combination with clustering techniques to learn security rules for cryptography APIs from large codebases.
- We will study how to automatically learn to identify security vulnerabilities related to the handling of untrusted inputs (cross-Site scripting, SQL injection, path traversal, remote code execution) from large codebases.

Part III: Security of Datacenters and Networks

- We will show how to ensure that datacenters and ISPs are secured using declarative reasoning methods (e.g., Datalog). We will also see how to automatically synthesize secure configurations (e.g. using SyNET and NetComplete) which lead to desirable behaviors, thus automating the job of the network operator and avoiding critical errors.
- We will discuss how to apply modern discrete probabilistic inference (e.g., PSI and Bayonet) so to reason about probabilistic network properties (e.g., the probability of a packet reaching a destination if links fail).

Part IV: Security of AI-based Systems

- We will look into the security issues related to modern systems that combine machine learning models (e.g., neural networks) within traditional systems such as cars, airplanes, and medical systems.
- We will learn state-of-the-art techniques for security testing and certifying entire AI-based systems, such as autonomous driving systems.

To gain a deeper understanding, the course will involve a hands-on programming project where the methods studied in the class will be applied.
263-3710-00LMachine Perception Information Belegung eingeschränkt - Details anzeigen
Number of participants limited to 150.
W5 KP2V + 1U + 1AO. Hilliges
KurzbeschreibungRecent developments in neural networks (aka “deep learning”) have drastically advanced the performance of machine perception systems in a variety of areas including computer vision, robotics, and intelligent UIs. This course is a deep dive into deep learning algorithms and architectures with applications to a variety of perceptual tasks.
LernzielStudents will learn about fundamental aspects of modern deep learning approaches for perception. Students will learn to implement, train and debug their own neural networks and gain a detailed understanding of cutting-edge research in learning-based computer vision, robotics and HCI. The final project assignment will involve training a complex neural network architecture and applying it on a real-world dataset of human activity.

The core competency acquired through this course is a solid foundation in deep-learning algorithms to process and interpret human input into computing systems. In particular, students should be able to develop systems that deal with the problem of recognizing people in images, detecting and describing body parts, inferring their spatial configuration, performing action/gesture recognition from still images or image sequences, also considering multi-modal data, among others.
InhaltWe will focus on teaching: how to set up the problem of machine perception, the learning algorithms, network architectures and advanced deep learning concepts in particular probabilistic deep learning models

The course covers the following main areas:
I) Foundations of deep-learning.
II) Probabilistic deep-learning for generative modelling of data (latent variable models, generative adversarial networks and auto-regressive models).
III) Deep learning in computer vision, human-computer interaction and robotics.

Specific topics include: 
I) Deep learning basics:
a) Neural Networks and training (i.e., backpropagation)
b) Feedforward Networks
c) Timeseries modelling (RNN, GRU, LSTM)
d) Convolutional Neural Networks for classification
II) Probabilistic Deep Learning:
a) Latent variable models (VAEs)
b) Generative adversarial networks (GANs)
c) Autoregressive models (PixelCNN, PixelRNN, TCNs)
III) Deep Learning techniques for machine perception:
a) Fully Convolutional architectures for dense per-pixel tasks (i.e., instance segmentation)
b) Pose estimation and other tasks involving human activity
c) Deep reinforcement learning
IV) Case studies from research in computer vision, HCI, robotics and signal processing
LiteraturDeep Learning
Book by Ian Goodfellow and Yoshua Bengio
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesThis is an advanced grad-level course that requires a background in machine learning. Students are expected to have a solid mathematical foundation, in particular in linear algebra, multivariate calculus, and probability. The course will focus on state-of-the-art research in deep-learning and will not repeat basics of machine learning

Please take note of the following conditions:
1) The number of participants is limited to 150 students (MSc and PhDs).
2) Students must have taken the exam in Machine Learning (252-0535-00) or have acquired equivalent knowledge
3) All practical exercises will require basic knowledge of Python and will use libraries such as TensorFlow, scikit-learn and scikit-image. We will provide introductions to TensorFlow and other libraries that are needed but will not provide introductions to basic programming or Python.

The following courses are strongly recommended as prerequisite:
* "Visual Computing" or "Computer Vision"

The course will be assessed by a final written examination in English. No course materials or electronic devices can be used during the examination. Note that the examination will be based on the contents of the lectures, the associated reading materials and the exercises.
263-3826-00LData Stream Processing and Analytics Information W6 KP2V + 2U + 1AV. Kalavri
KurzbeschreibungThe course covers fundamentals of large-scale data stream processing. The focus is on the design and architecture of modern distributed streaming systems as well as algorithms for analyzing data streams.
LernzielThis course has the goal of providing an overview of the data stream processing model and introducing modern platforms and tools for anlayzing massive data streams. By the end of the course, students should be able to use techniques for extracting knowledge from continuous, fast data streams. They will also have gained a deep understanding of the design and implementation of modern distributed stream processors through a series of hands-on exercises.
InhaltModern data-driven applications require continuous, low-latency processing of large-scale, rapid data events such as videos, images, emails, chats, clicks, search queries, financial transactions, traffic records, sensor measurements, etc. Extracting knowledge from these data streams is particularly challenging due to their high speed and massive volume.
Distributed stream processing has recently become highly popular across industry and academia due to its capabilities to both improve established data processing tasks and to facilitate novel applications with real-time requirements. In this course, we will study the design and architecture of modern distributed streaming systems as well as fundamental algorithms for analyzing data streams.
SkriptSchedule and lecture notes will be posted in the course website: https://www.systems.ethz.ch/courses/spring2019/dspa/
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesThe exercise sessions will be a mixture of (1) reviews, discussions, and evaluation of research papers on data stream processing, and (2) programming assignments on implementing data stream mining algorithms and anlysis tasks.

- Basic knowledge of relational data management and distributed systems.

- Basic programming skills in Java and/or Rust is necessary to carry out the practical exercises and final project.
263-4506-00LMassively Parallel Algorithms Information W6 KP2V + 1U + 2AM. Ghaffari
KurzbeschreibungData sizes are growing faster than the capacities of single processors. This makes it almost a certainty that the future of computation will rely on parallelism. In this new graduate-level course, we discuss the expanding body of work on the theoretical foundations of modern parallel computation, with an emphasis on the algorithmic tools and techniques for large-scale processing.
LernzielThis course will familiarize the students with the algorithmic tools and techniques in modern parallel computation. In particular, we will discuss the growing body of algorithmic results in the Massively Parallel Computation (MPC) model. This model is a mathematical abstraction of some of the popular large-scale processing settings such as MapReduce, Hadoop, Spark, etc. By the end of the semester, the students will know all the standard tools of this area, as well as the state of the art on a number of the central problems. Our hope is that the course prepares the students for independent research at the frontier of this area, and we will attempt to move in that direction with the course projects.

The course assumes no particular familiarity with parallel computation and should be accesible to any student with sufficient theoretical/algorithmic background. In particular, we expect that all students are comfortable with the basics of algorithmics designs and analysis, as well as probability theory.
InhaltThe course will cover a sampling of the recent developments (and open questions) at the frontier of research in massively/modern parallel computation. the material will be based on compilation of recent papers on this area, which will be provided throughout the semester.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesThe class does not expect any prior knowledge in parallel algorithms/computing. Our only prerequisite is the undergraduate class Algorithms, Probability, and Computing (APC) or any other course that can be seen as the equivalent. In particular, much of waht we will discuss uses randomized algorithms and therefore, we will assume that the students are familiar with the tools and techniques in randomized algorithms and analysis (to the extent covered in the APC class).
263-5215-00LFairness, Explainability, and Accountability for Machine Learning Information Belegung eingeschränkt - Details anzeigen
Number of participants limited to 40.

The deadline for deregistering expires at the end of the second week of the semester. Students who are still registered after that date, but do not attend the course, will officially fail the course.
W4 KP1V + 2PH. Heidari
Kurzbeschreibung
Lernziel- Familiarize students with the ethical implications of applying Big Data and ML tools to socially-sensitive domains; teach them to think critically about these issues.
- Overview the long-established philosophical, sociological, and economic literature on these subjects.
- Provide students with a tool-box of technical solutions for addressing - at least partially - the ethical and societal issues of ML and Big data.
InhaltAs ML continues to advance and make its way into different aspects of modern life, both the designers and users of the technology need to think seriously about its impact on individuals and society. We will study some of the ethical implications of applying ML tools to socially sensitive domains, such as employment, education, credit ledning, and criminal justice. We will discuss at length what it means for an algorithm to be fair; who should be held responsible when algorithmic decisions negatively impacts certain demographic groups or individuals; and last but not least, how algorithmic decisions can be explained to a non-technical audience. Throughout the course, we will focus on technical solutions that have been recently proposed by the ML community to tackle the above issues. We will critically discuss the advantages and shortcomings of these proposals in comparison with non-technical alternatives.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesStudents are expected to sufficient knowledge of ML (i.e. they must have taken the "Introduction to Machine Learning" or an equivalent course).
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