Search result: Catalogue data in Spring Semester 2019

Biology Bachelor Information
3. Year, 6. Semester
Block Courses
Registration for Block courses is mandatory. Please register under https://www.uzh.ch/zoolmed/ssl-dir/Blockkurse_UNIETH.php . Registration period: 17.12.2018 - 07.01.2019
Block Courses in 1st Quarter of the Semester
From 19.2.2019 13:00 - 13.3.2019 17:00
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
551-0360-00LApplied Plant Biotechnology Restricted registration - show details
Does not take place this semester.
Number of participants limited to 8.

The enrolment is done by the D-BIOL study administration.
W6 credits7GW. Gruissem
AbstractThe APB covers multidisciplinary aspects of green biotechnology. Students will acquire knowledge about transgenic crops in the world, processes to generate transgenic plants as well as strategies to engineer plants resistant to biotic and abiotic stresses. Development of new tools for plant biotechnology will be performed in the lab. Social aspects of green biotechnology will also be presented.
ObjectiveThe complete field of Plant Biotechnology shall be introduced in order to provide an overview over the diversity of this discipline, its connections with other disciplines, and its historical context. A major focus of the block course will be the potential of genetic modification as a tool for gene function in basic science as well as for agronomic and/or commercial application dealing with benefit and risk. Basic methods will be handled in practical experiments, lectures will provide the theoretical background including issues beyond the scientific scene like patent issues, ethical considerations, or legal regulation. The goal of this teaching unit is to educate interested students such that they overlook the discipline, are able to understand the basic methodical and intellectual approaches, understand and critically interpret the literature on this field and are able to further follow the development in this field after finishing their studies. Finally, the students should learn to develop own research projects and follow them including communication of their work to the public or the media.
ContentThe following theoretical topics will be presented:

- Plant tissue culture (N. benthamiana, cereals, cassava, cell cultures, somatic embryogenesis, regeneration)
- Methods for genetic transformation (Agrobacterium) and Molecular analysis of genetically modified (GM) plants (copy number, inheritance of transgenes etc)
- Selection systems (antibiotic and herbicide resistance, phosphor-mannose isomerase, marker-free systems, visible markers)
- Inducible promoters, tissue specific promoters
- Silencing and its application in plant biotechnology
- Biotechnological tools for crop improvement (the case of cassava and rice)
- Application potential (herbicide tolerance, pest and pathogen resistance, biofuel etc.)
- Public interest (ethical issues, patenting of GM-plants, GM food, public outreach).

Lectures will have a special focus on the contribution of biotechnology to the improvement of tropical crops such as cassava and rice. A visit to the greenhouse facilities is also planned to give the opportunity to discuss the different project performed at the ETH Plant Biotechnology Lab.

For the practical part of the blockcourse, students will perform their own research project. It will aim at the development of new promoters for green biotechnology. Students will clone the specific promoters from different plant species and subsequently produce transgenic plant cells using the methods presented during the course. Project to identify new plant resistance genes from genetically diverse set of rice lines will also be carried out as part of the practicals.
Lecture notesScripts will be distributed in the course for the practical parts and/or on Moodle platform.
LiteratureLiterature will be provided in the course
Prerequisites / NoticeLectures of APB are given in English.
551-0342-00LMetabolomics Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 15.

The enrolment is done by the D-BIOL study administration.
W6 credits7GN. Zamboni, U. Sauer
AbstractThe course covers all basic aspects of metabolome measurements, from sample sampling to mass spectrometry and data analysis. Participants work in groups and independently perform and interpret metabolomic experiments.
ObjectivePerforming and reporting a metabolomic experiment, understanding pro and cons of mass spectrometry based metabolomics. Knowledge of workflows and tools to assist experiment interpretation, and metabolite identification.
ContentBasics of metabolomics: workflows, sample preparation, targeted and untargeted mass spectrometry, instrumentation, separation techniques (GC, LC, CE), metabolite identification, data interpretation and integration, normalization, QCs, maintenance.

Soft skills to be trained: project planning, presentation, reporting, independent working style, team work.
551-0339-00LMolecular Mechanisms of Cell Dynamics Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 13.

The enrolment is done by the D-BIOL study administration.
W6 credits7GE. Dultz, Y. Barral, U. Kutay, M. Peter, K. Weis
AbstractApplication of current strategies to study complex and highly regulated cellular processes during cell division and growth.
ObjectiveThe students learn to evaluate and to apply the current strategies to study complex and highly regulated cellular processes during cell division and growth.
ContentDuring this Block-Course, the students will learn to (1) describe the main regulators and the mechanics of cell division and growth, (2) perform standard lab techniques and quantitate dynamic cellular processes during cell division and growth, (3) evaluate and compare experimental strategies and model systems, (4) independently search and critically evaluate scientific literature on a specific problem and present it in a seminar, and (5) formulate scientific concepts (preparation and presentation of a poster).
Students will work in small groups in individual labs on one research project (8 full days of practical work; every group of students will stay in the same lab during the entire course). The projects are close to the actual research carried out in the participating research groups, but with a clear connection to the subject of the course.
LiteratureDocumentation and recommended literature (review articles and selected primary literature) will be provided during the course.
Prerequisites / NoticeThis course will be taught in english.
551-1516-00LNeuron-Glia Interactions and Myelination in Health and Disease Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 15.

The enrolment is done by the D-BIOL study administration.
W6 credits7GU. Suter
AbstractThe course provides general basic insights and new perspectives in the development, plasticity and repair of the nervous system. The focus is on molecular, cellular and transgenic approaches.
ObjectiveThrough a combination of practical work with lectures, discussions, project preparations and presentations, the students learns basic principles of neural plasticity and repair in health and disease. The course is closely linked to ongoing research projects in the lab to provide the participants with direct insights into current experimental approaches and strategies.
551-0914-00LScience and Society and Research Ethics Restricted registration - show details
Does not take place this semester.
Number of participants limited to 25
The block course will only take place with a minimum of 10 participants.

The enrolment is done by the D-BIOL study administration.
W6 credits7GE. Hafen
AbstractThis introductory course addresses the need to improve the dialogue between researchers and society and to deepen the understanding of ethical questions related to research. It provides an opportunity to recognize and discuss the social and ethical aspects of science.
ObjectiveThe learning objectives of the course are to:
-begin to explore the roles and responsibilities of the modern scientist;
-help you to gain insights as a scientist into the social and ethical aspects of scientific research;
-provide opportunities for you to debate on the social and ethical aspects of science, either from the point of a scientist or as a citizen.
ContentScientists are increasingly demanded to discuss and communicate social and ethical issues that arise from their work. Understanding these issues is also part of developing science and technology responsibly. However, the formal education system often requires scientists to focus on core science subjects at the expense of learning about the social and ethical implications of their work. In this course, we provide opportunities for practicing scientists to recognize social and ethical aspects of their work, and to develop knowledge and skills to discuss them with confidence.
LiteratureThe course is not taught by a particular book, but recommended literature (review articles and selected primary literature) will be provided during the course. Members of the course will use twitter @DSS131 and #DSS15
551-0118-00LPlant Cell Biology Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 12.

The enrolment is done by the D-BIOL study administration.

The course «551-0118-00L Plant Cell Biology» must be booked as «BIO 281 Plant Cell Biology» in the block course tool.
W6 credits7GC. Sánchez-Rodríguez, J. Vermeer
AbstractThe course is a collaboration of the Plant Cell Biology groups of ETHZ and UZH. The students will learn key concepts related with the remarkable ability of plants to adapt to challenges provided by their environment (both biotic, such as pathogens, and abiotic, like nutrient deficiencies). A multidisciplinary approach including molecular genetics, cell biology, biochemistry and bioinformatics tool
ObjectiveIn this course, students will get cell biological and molecular genetics insights into the developmental plasticity of plants to adapt to their environmental conditions using the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. With this aim, they will actively participate in ongoing research projects tutored by doctoral students.
ContentStudents will be engaged in research projects aimed to understand the specialized mechanisms evolved by the plants to grow under challenging environments. In a lecture series, the theoretical background for the projects and their interrelationship is provided.
Students will design and perform experiments, evaluate experimental results, present their projects, and discuss recent publications to understand the relevance of their work in the context of the current state of plant development and stress response.
Lecture notesNo script
LiteratureThe recommended literature and list of individual reading assignments will be provided during the course
Prerequisites / NoticeAll general lectures will be held at ETH Centrum (LFW building). Students will be divided into small groups to carry out experiments at ETH (Central; LFW) and UZH (Botanical Garden)
Block Courses in 2nd Quarter of the Semester
From 14.3.2019 8:00 - 4.4.2019 17:00
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
376-1346-00LStudy of Epigenetic Mechanisms in Mental Health Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 8

The enrolment is done by the D-BIOL study administration.
W6 credits7GI. Mansuy
AbstractThis block course is focused on the study of the epigenetic mechanisms that regulate complex brain functions and behavior. It provides an overview of molecular methods used in experimental mice or in human samples to investigate epigenetic processes that control genome activity and gene expression, and are associated with cognitive functions and behavioral responses.
ObjectiveThe purpose is to learn the principles of major methods in epigenetics that allow examine genome activity at the level of DNA, RNA or protein, in the context of complex brain functions.
Content4 independent projects for 3 students each covering various aspects of epigenetic mechanisms. It will focus on state-of-the-art techniques to measure or manipulate gene expression and gene activity in the adult brain or in cell culture, and analyse the effects in vitro or in vivo using omics analyses, molecular and biochemical tools and behavioral testing.
Lecture notesProvided at the beginning of the practical.
551-0352-00LProtein Analysis by Mass Spectrometry Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 12.

The enrolment is done by the D-BIOL study administration.
W6 credits7GL. Gillet, B. Collins, P. Picotti
AbstractProtein Analysis by Mass Spectrometry
The following topics will be covered: basics of biological mass spectrometry, including instrumentation, data collection and data analysis; applications to protein identification and characterization; sample preparation methods; proteomics strategies; and quantitative analysis.
ObjectiveHow to prepare a protein sample for MS analysis (trypsin digestion, C18 clean-up)
Principles of data acquisition LC-MS (QTOF and/or Ion Trap instruments)
Perform qualitative proteomic analysis (protein identification with Mascot and/or Sequest Softwares)
Perform quantitative proteomic analysis (label-free and labeled analyses)
Analyze/interpret the data to find up/down regulated proteins
551-0434-00LNMR Spectroscopy in Biology Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 6.

The enrolment is done by the D-BIOL study administration.
W6 credits7GF. Allain, A. D. Gossert, K. Wüthrich
AbstractIn this block course, students actively participate in ongoing research projects in the research groups of Profs. Allain, Wüthrich and Dr. Gossert. The students will be tutored in their experimental work by experienced postdoc students. In addition, the course includes specific lectures that provide the theoretical background for the experimental work, as well as exercises and literature work.
ObjectiveThe course provides first "hands on" insight into applications of NMR spectroscopy in biological sciences. The course should enable the students to understand the potential and limitations of NMR applied to biological problems.
ContentThe topics include studies of proteins, RNA and protein-RNA interactions,

Participation in one of the following projects will be possible:
- NMR of RNA
- NMR of several protein-RNA complexes (hnRNPF, nPTB, SR proteins)
- NMR studies of protein-ligand interactions
- dynamics of protein-RNA complexes
- Segmental isotopic labeling to study multidomain proteins
- NMR Methods Development
Lecture notesNo script
LiteratureLists of individual reading assignments will be handed out.
529-0810-01LLaboratory Course Organic Chemistry II (for D-BIOL) Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 12.

Please contact Prof. C. Thilgen (thilgen@org.chem.ethz.ch) as early as possible, end of Autumn Semester. You will get a confirmation if you are accepted.

The enrolment is done by the D-BIOL study administration.

The de-facto language of instruction depends on the tutor.
W12 credits4PC. Thilgen
AbstractAn organic-synthetic sub-project of the current research of a group from the Laboratory of Organic Chemistry is carried out under the guidance of doctoral students.
ObjectiveLearn to plan and carry out challenging multistep syntheses making use of modern methods; reach a deeper understanding of organic reactions through experimental work; develop an organic-synthetic research project; take accurate notes, write a publication style report, and present the obtained results in a seminar.
ContentAn organic-synthetic sub-project of the current research of a group from the Laboratory of Organic Chemistry is carried out under the guidance of doctoral students.
Lecture notesNo course notes.
LiteratureNo set textbooks. Literature will be indicated or provided by the supervising TAs.
Prerequisites / NoticeCourse prerequisites: Accomplished laboratory course Organic Chemistry I (529-0229-00) and passed session exam Organic Chemistry I (529-0221-00 or 529-1011-00) / Organic Chemistry II (529-0222-00 or 529-1012-00). The number of participants is limited to 12.
551-1147-00LBioactive Natural Products from Bacteria Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 7.

The enrolment is done by the D-BIOL study administration.
W6 credits7GJ. Piel
AbstractLab course. In small groups projects of relevance to current research questions in the field of bacterial natural product biosynthesis are addressed.
ObjectiveIntroduction to relevant subjects of the secondary metabolism of bacteria. Training in practical work in a research laboratory. Scientific writing in form of a research report.
ContentResearch project on bacteria that produce bioactive natural products (e.g., Streptomycetes, Cyanobacteria, uncultivated bacteria). The techniques used will depend on the project, e.g. PCR, cloning, natural product analysis, precursor feeding studies, enzyme expression and analysis.
Lecture notesnone.
LiteratureWill be provided for each of the projects at the beginning of the course.
551-1554-00LMultigene Expression in Mammalian Cells Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 5.

The enrolment is done by the D-BIOL study administration.
W6 credits7GP. Berger, G. Schertler
AbstractGenetic engineering of mammalian cells with multiple expression cassettes is an essential need in contemporary cell biology. It is useful for protein expression for structural studies, the reprogramming of somatic cells, or for the expression of several fluorescently-tagged sensors. In this course, we use MultiLabel (Kriz et al., Nat. Commun., 2010) to create multigene expression plasmids.
ObjectiveStudents will learn to design and clone multigene expression constructs for mammalian cells. The functionality of the constructs will be tested by immunofluorescence microscopy or Western blotting.
ContentWe will clone fluorescently-tagged markers for subcellular compartments, assemble them to a multigene expression construct and transfect them into mammalian cells. These markers of subcellular compartments will be used to study the trafficking of activated receptors (e.g. serotonin receptor). Pictures will be taken on our microscopes and then we will quantify colocalization.
Lecture notesnone
551-0436-00LCryo-electron Microscopic Studies of Ribosomal Complexes with Biomedically Important Viral mRNAs Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 15.

The enrolment is done by the D-BIOL study administration.
W6 credits7GN. Ban, D. Böhringer, M. A. Leibundgut
AbstractSome viral mRNAs, such as from Hepatitis C virus, hijack cellular translational machinery by binding directly to the ribosome and circumventing the need for cellular initiation factors. They accomplish this through structured elements within the mRNAs called internal ribosome entry sites (IRESs). Participants of this course will visualize ribosomes in complex with viral IRESs at high resolution.
ObjectiveThe goal of the course is to acquire the most important techniques and methods for the purification and structural characterisation of macromolecular complexes by transmission electron microscopy. The emphasis of the course is on the special practical requirements for the application of these techniques on macromolecular structures in the MDa range.
ContentProtein synthesis is a very energy intensive process that can consume over half the total metabolism of a cell. In eukaryotes, translation is therefore tightly regulated at the stage of initiation. Regulatory processes are much more complex at this step than in prokaryotes and a large number of RNA modification processes and translation initiation factors are required to ensure faithful initiation, elongation and termination of translation. Viral messenger RNAs are often produced by their own machinery, however, and need to be incorporated into the host translation machinery without the usual processing and therefore many viruses have developed strategies to circumvent the need for initiation factors. They accomplish this through highly structured elements within their RNA called internal ribosome entry sites (IRESs) that are able to initiate translation without the normal signals. Some viral IRESs, such as the IRESs from polio-virus or HIV, require most of the normal eIFs and even additional proteins. Others, such as the hepatitis C virus IRES, are able to bind directly to the ribosome and need only a few of the normal initiation factors. Within the Ban lab, we have studied, and continue to investigate, medically relevant viral IRESs. The course will involve producing, and attempting to determine the structures of, IRESs that have yet to have had their ribosome-bound structures resolved.

A variety of purification techniques, including preparative gel electrophoresis and ultracentrifugation, will be used during the purification of macromolecular complexes. Purified assemblies will be then investigated functionally. Students will then characterise their samples structurally through transmission electron cryo-microscopy (cryo-EM), including sample preparation, microscopy, data evaluation and the calculation of densities. Finally, students will learn how to build and refine molecular models into parts of the calculated cryo-EM density. The participants will be working on a closed project related to current research within the laboratory and throughout the course the practical work will be accompanied by brief theoretical introductions. The principal aim of the course is to strengthen the skills required to independently conduct meaningful biophysical and biochemical experiments and to provide an early introduction into the structural characterisation of cellular macromolecular assemblies.
Lecture notesA script will be distributed at the beginning of the course that will cover the experiments to be performed, provide references to the relevant literature and suggest points for further consideration for interested students.
LiteratureLiterature
A basic overview is provided within the references below. Further reading and citations shall be detailed in the course script.
- A. Fersht, Structure and mechanism in protein science, Freeman, 1999 (Chapters 1 and 6).
- M. van Heel et al., Single-particle electron cryo microscopy: towards atomic resolution, Quart. Rev. Biophys. (33), 307-369 (2000).
Prerequisites / NoticeThe course will be held in English. Students should have either completed courses:
551-0307-00L Biomolecular Structure and Mechanism I: Protein Structure and Function
551-0307-01L Biomolecular Structure and Mechanism II: Large Cellular Machines
or equivalent courses covering the structure and function of biological macromolecules.
551-1712-00LSocial Entrepreneurship and Biological Approaches to Sustainable Development Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 30
The block course will only take place with a minimum of 10 participants.

The enrolment is done by the D-BIOL study administration.
W6 credits7GE. Hafen, D. Boschung, J. Bouwsma, A. Lashansky, P. C. Mankeekar
AbstractThe course gives students insights into the United Nations’ seventeen Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and how scientific thinking and the knowledge about biological mechanisms can help to address challenges associated with the SDGs. A special focus will be on company models whose goal is not only to maximize financial gains for investors but on social responsibility and societal impact.
ObjectiveThe students possess a general knowledge about the basic concepts in biology. They are accustomed with the principles of experimental work (setting up and testing of hypotheses). In the lectures during the first two years they learnt about the limits of our biological understanding today and what the open questions with respect to human biology are.
Prerequisites / NoticeStudent teams will develop their own business idea and pitch it to a group of entrepreneurs and investors.
Block Courses in 3rd Quarter of the Semester
From 5.4.2019 8:00 - 8.5.2019 17:00
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
551-0362-00LAnalysis of Signaling Networks by Mass Spectrometry Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 10.

The enrolment is done by the D-BIOL study administration.
W6 credits7GM. Gstaiger, M. Claassen, B. Wollscheid
AbstractThis course provides the theoretical and practical basis for the biochemical and computational analysis of signaling networks using quantitative mass spectrometry and advanced statistical methods.
ObjectiveIn this course we will introduce basic and emerging techniques to study dynamic signalling networks using state of the art quantitative mass spectrometry techniques. This will involve the systematic characterization of signaling networks by affinity purification and phospho-peptide enrichment combined with quantitative mass spectrometry. We will also introduce and apply computational tools for statistical analysis, data visualization and network inference to build new hypothesis on the basis of the obtained data.
Prerequisites / NoticeThis course requires a basic knowledge in mass spectrometry based proteomics and experience in computational data processing using R or MatLab. Ideally this course should be combined with course 551-0352-00L "Protein Analysis by Mass Spectrometry".
376-1332-00LCellular Neurobiology Restricted registration - show details
Does not take place this semester.
Number of participants limited to 10

The enrolment is done by the D-BIOL study administration.
W6 credits7GG. Schratt
AbstractIntroduction into neurobiological research techniques and hands-on work in actual research projects. The goal is to encourage independent scientific thinking and to translate theoretical knowledge into practical experiments. The course includes reading of original articles and presentation of the work done.
ObjectiveHands-on work in actual research projects to encourage independent scientific thinking and translation of theoretical knowledge into practical experiments. Further goals are reading and interpretation of original literature and presentation of ones work.
ContentIntroduction into neurobiological research techniques and collaboration in actual research projects. The goal is to encourage independent scientific thinking and to translate theoretical knowledge into practical experiments. The experimental focus will be on cell culture work (primary cell cultures and cell lines), cell biological, molecular biology and biochemical approaches. The course includes reading of original articles and presentation of the work done.
Lecture notesOriginal articles will be handed out and discussed during the course.
LiteratureOriginal articles will be handed out and discussed during the course.
529-0810-01LLaboratory Course Organic Chemistry II (for D-BIOL) Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 12.

Please contact Prof. C. Thilgen (thilgen@org.chem.ethz.ch) as early as possible, end of Autumn Semester. You will get a confirmation if you are accepted.

The enrolment is done by the D-BIOL study administration.

The de-facto language of instruction depends on the tutor.
W12 credits4PC. Thilgen
AbstractAn organic-synthetic sub-project of the current research of a group from the Laboratory of Organic Chemistry is carried out under the guidance of doctoral students.
ObjectiveLearn to plan and carry out challenging multistep syntheses making use of modern methods; reach a deeper understanding of organic reactions through experimental work; develop an organic-synthetic research project; take accurate notes, write a publication style report, and present the obtained results in a seminar.
ContentAn organic-synthetic sub-project of the current research of a group from the Laboratory of Organic Chemistry is carried out under the guidance of doctoral students.
Lecture notesNo course notes.
LiteratureNo set textbooks. Literature will be indicated or provided by the supervising TAs.
Prerequisites / NoticeCourse prerequisites: Accomplished laboratory course Organic Chemistry I (529-0229-00) and passed session exam Organic Chemistry I (529-0221-00 or 529-1011-00) / Organic Chemistry II (529-0222-00 or 529-1012-00). The number of participants is limited to 12.
551-0344-00LPlant-Microbe Interactions Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 10.

The enrolment is done by the D-BIOL study administration.
W6 credits7GH.‑M. Fischer, J. Vorholt-Zambelli
AbstractLab course. In small groups projects of relevance to current research questions in the field of plant-microbe interactions are addressed.
ObjectiveIntroduction to relevant subjects of the biology of plant-associated microorganisms. Training in practical work in a research laboratory. Exposure to current research topics in the field of plant-microbe interactions. Scientific writing in form of a research report.
ContentResearch project on plant-associated microorganisms (i.e. Bradyrhizobium, Methylobacterium, Sphingomonas). The techniques used will depend on the project, e.g. PCR, cloning, community analysis, plant inoculation experiments, phenotypic analysis, plant transformation, (fluorescence) microscopy, monitoring gene expression
Lecture notesnone
LiteratureWill be provided for each of the projects at the beginning of the course.
551-1556-00LMacromolecular Structure Determination Using Modern Methods Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 11 in the 3rd semester quarter of the spring semester

Number of participants limited to 12 in the 4th semester quarter of the spring semester

The enrolment is done by the D-BIOL study administration.
W6 credits7GK. Locher, G. Schertler
AbstractThis course will expose the students to two prominent techniques for high-resolution structural characterization of biological macromolecules. The students will have the opportunity to get hands-on experience in either cryo-electron microscopy (ETH) or X-ray crystallography (PSI).
ObjectiveThe goal of this course is to introduce the students to the principles of high-resolution structure determination. Students will conduct hands-on experiments and use computational techniques for data processing.
ContentAt the ETH the students will prepare and vitrify a protein and then image it on a cryo-TEM. Next, the students will process the data and build an atomic model into the EM map.

At the PSI the students will purify and crystallize a membrane protein, collect X-ray diffraction data using synchrotron X-ray source or with cryo-EM, analyze and build an atomic model into a density map. They will refine this model and interpret and illustrate the determined structure. The course work is trying to present insights in the use of structural information. The course also includes a demonstration of the Synchrotron capabilities at the Paul Scherrer Institute (SLS).
Prerequisites / NoticeThe students will be split into two groups for the practical part of the work: One group will work at ETH Hönggerberg, the other at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) at Villigen. All students will spend one full day at the PSI for a tour of the facilities, including a visit of the synchrotron beam lines of the Swiss Light Source SLS.

The students joining the ETH Hönggerberg group will spend the majority of the time on data processing and are therefore expected to have some basic knowledge of bash terminal commands. Basic physics, optics and linear algebra knowledge is also helpful. By the end of the course, the students will be expected to understand concepts such as the difference between Fourier and real space, image formation, contrast transfer, fast Fourier transfer and Fourier shell correlation.
551-1312-00LRNA-Biology II Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 16.

The enrolment is done by the D-BIOL study administration.
W6 credits7GS. Jonas, F. Allain, C. Beyer, U. Kutay, O. Voinnet, K. Weis
AbstractIntroduction to the diversity of current RNA-research at all levels from structural biology to systems biology using mainly model systems like S. cerevisiae (yeast), mammalian cells.
ObjectiveThe students will obtain an overview about the diversity of current RNA-research. They will learn to design experiments and use techniques necessary to analyze different aspects of RNA biology. Through lectures and literature seminars, they will learn about the burning questions of RNA research and discuss approaches to address these questions experimentally. In practical lab projects the students will work in one of the participating laboratories. Finally, they will learn how to present and discuss their data in an appropriate manner. Student assessment is a graded semester performance based on individual performance in the laboratory, the written exam and the project presentation.
Lecture notesRelevant material from the lectures will be made available during the course via the corresponding Moodle page.
LiteratureDocumentation and recommended literature will be provided at the beginning and during the course.
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