Search result: Catalogue data in Autumn Semester 2016

Environmental Sciences Master Information
Minors
Minor in Sustainable Energy Use
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
701-0967-00LProject Development in Renewable Energies Information Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 30.
W2 credits2GR. Rechsteiner, A. Appenzeller, A. Wanner
AbstractProject development in renewable Energies
Realization of projects in the field of renewable energies, analysis of legal frame conditions and risks.
The students learn basics of renewable energy project realization from acknowledged experts active in the field.
They identify different tasks of various investor types.
They develop sample projects in practice within groups
ObjectiveYou become acquainted with the regulative, juridical and economic requirements of project development in renewable energies in the fireld of wind power, solar power and hydro power.
You learn to launch and judge projects by exercises in groups
You recognize chances and risks of renewable energy projects
ContentBusiness models for renewable energy projects
Introduction of market trends, market structure, technical trends and regulation in Switzerland and in the EU internal energy market
Necessary frame conditions for profitable projects
Project development samples and exercises in
wind power
hydro power
photovoltaics
due diligence and country assessment.
Exact Program in German below
http://www.rechsteiner-basel.ch/index.php?id=27
Lecture notesPPT presentation will be distributed (in German)
special frames:
http://www.rechsteiner-basel.ch/Lehrmittel.27.0.html
LiteratureLonglist: http://www.rechsteiner-basel.ch/uploads/media/edoc_literaturliste_1404.pdf
REN21 Renewables GLOBAL STATUS REPORT http://www.ren21.net
Mit einer grünen Anlage schwarze Zahlen schreiben Link
UNEP: Global Trends in Renewable Energy Investments http://fs-unep-centre.org
Renewable Energy World: Market Status http://www.renewableenergyworld.com/rea/magazine/renewable-energy-world
Ryan Wiser, Mark Bolinger: Wind Technologies Market Report, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory https://emp.lbl.gov/publications/2014-wind-technologies-market-report
IEA PVPS: TRENDS 2014 IN PHOTOVOLTAIC APPLICATIONS http://www.iea-pvps.org/index.php?id=92&eID=dam_frontend_push&docID=2795
Bundesamt für Energie: Perspektiven für die Grosswasserkraft in der Schweiz http://www.news.admin.ch/NSBSubscriber/message/attachments/33285.pdf
Windenergie-Report Deutschland Link
Prerequisites / NoticeFor group exercise and presentation reasons the number of participants is limited at 35 students. For exercices students build learning and presentational groups.
701-1346-00LCarbon Mitigation Information W3 credits2GN. Gruber
AbstractFuture climate change can only kept within reasonable bounds when CO2 emissions are drastically reduced. In this course, we will discuss a portfolio of options involving the alteration of natural carbon sinks and carbon sequestration. The course includes introductory lectures, presentations from guest speakers from industry and the public sector, and final presentations by the students.
ObjectiveThe goal of this course is to investigate, as a group, a particular set of carbon mitigation/sequestration options and to evaluate their potential, their cost, and their consequences.
ContentFrom the large number of carbon sequestration/mitigation options, a few options will be selected and then investigated in detail by the students. The results of this research will then be presented to the other students, the involved faculty, and discussed in detail by the whole group.
Lecture notesNone
LiteratureWill be identified based on the chosen topic.
Prerequisites / NoticeExam: No final exam. Pass/No-Pass is assigned based on the quality of the presentation and ensuing discussion.
051-0551-00LEnergy- and Climate Systems I Information W2 credits2GA. Schlüter
AbstractThe lecture contains concepts, physics and components of building technologies for the efficient and sustainable energy supply and climatisation of buildings and their interaction with architecture and urban design. Using calculations, students learn to aquire relevant numbers and assess the performance of solutions.
ObjectiveThe lecture series focuses on the physical principles and technical components of relevant systems for an efficient and sustainable climatisation and energy supply of buildings. A special focus is on the interrelation of supply systems and architectural design and construction. Learning and practicing methods of quantifying demand and supply allows identifying parameters relevant for design.
Content1. Introduction
2. Heating and cooling
3. Active and passive ventilation
4. Electricity in buildings
Lecture notesThe Slides from the lecture serve as lecture notes and are available as download.
LiteratureA list of relevant literature is available at the chair.
227-0731-00LPower Market I - Portfolio and Risk Management Information W6 credits4GD. Reichelt, G. A. Koeppel
AbstractPortfolio and risk management in the electrical power business, Pan-European power market and trading, futures and forward contracts, hedging, options and derivatives, performance indicators for the risk management, modelling of physical assets, cross-border trading, ancillary services, balancing power market, Swiss market model
ObjectiveKnowlege on the worldwide liberalisation of electricity markets, pan-european power trading and the role of power exchanges. Understand financial products (derivatives) based on power. Management of a portfolio containing physical production, contracts and derivatives. Evaluate trading and hedging strategies. Apply methods and tools of risk management.
Content1. Pan-European power market and trading
1.1. Power trading
1.2. Development of the European power markets
1.3. Energy economics
1.4. Spot and OTC trading
1.5. European energy exchange EEX

2. Market model
2.1. Market place and organisation
2.2. Balance groups / balancing energy
2.3. Ancillary services
2.4. Market for ancillary services
2.5. Cross-border trading
2.6. Capacity auctions

3. Portfolio and Risk management
3.1. Portfolio management 1 (introduction)
3.2. Forward and futures contracts
3.3. Risk management 1 (m2m, VaR, hpfc, volatility, cVaR)
3.4. Risk management 2 (PaR)
3.5. Contract valuation (HPFC)
3.6. Portfolio management 2
2.8. Risk Management 3 (enterprise wide)

4. Energy & Finance I
4.1. Options 1 – basics
4.2. Options 2 – hedging with options
4.3. Introduction to derivatives (swaps, cap, floor, collar)
4.4. Financial modelling of physical assets
4.5. Trading and hydro power
4.6. Incentive regulation
Lecture notesHandouts of the lecture
Prerequisites / Notice1 excursion per semester, 2 case studies, guest speakers for specific topics.
Course Moodle: https://moodle-app2.let.ethz.ch/course/view.php?id=2196
227-1631-00LEnergy System Analysis Information W4 credits3GG. Hug, S. Hellweg, F. Noembrini, A. Schlüter
AbstractThe course provides an introduction to the methods and tools for analysis of energy consumption, energy production and energy flows. Environmental aspects are included as well as economical considerations. Different sectors of the society are discussed, such as electric power, buildings, and transportation. Models for energy system analysis planning are introduced.
ObjectiveThe purpose of the course is to give the participants an overview of the methods and tools used for energy systems analysis and how to use these in simple practical examples.
ContentThe course gives an introduction to methods and tools for analysis of energy consumption, energy production and energy flows. Both larger systems, e.g. countries, and smaller systems, e.g. industries, homes, vehicles, are studied. The tools and methods are applied to various problems during the exercises. Different conventions of energy statistics used are introduced.

The course provides also an introduction to energy systems models for developing scenarios of future energy consumption and production. Bottom-up and Top-Down approaches are addressed and their features and applications discussed.

The course contains the following parts:
Part I: Energy flows and energy statistics
Part II: Environmental impacts
Part III: Electric power systems
Part IV: Energy in buildings
Part V: Energy in transportation
Part VI: Energy systems models
Lecture notesHandouts
LiteratureK. Blok: Introduction to Energy Analysis, Techne Press, Amsterdam 2006, ISBN 90-8594-016-8
529-0193-00LRenewable Energy Technologies I
The lectures Renewable Energy Technologies I (529-0193-00L) and Renewable Energy Technologies II (529-0191-01L) can be taken independently from one another.
W4 credits3GA. Wokaun, A. Steinfeld
AbstractScenarios for world energy demand and CO2 emissions, implications for climate. Methods for the assessment of energy chains. Potential and technology of renewable energies: Biomass (heat, electricity, biofuels), solar energy (low temp. heat, solar thermal and photovoltaic electricity, solar chemistry). Wind and ocean energy, heat pumps, geothermal energy, energy from waste. CO2 sequestration.
ObjectiveScenarios for the development of world primary energy consumption are introduced. Students know the potential and limitations of renewable energies for reducing CO2 emissions, and their contribution towards a future sustainable energy system that respects climate protection goals.
ContentScenarios for the development of world energy consumption, energy intensity and economic development. Energy conversion chains, primary energy sources and availability of raw materials. Methods for the assessment of energy systems, ecological balances and life cycle analysis of complete energy chains. Biomass: carbon reservoirs and the carbon cycle, energetic utilisation of biomass, agricultural production of energy carriers, biofuels. Solar energy: solar collectors, solar-thermal power stations, solar chemistry, photovoltaics, photochemistry. Wind energy, wind power stations. Ocean energy (tides, waves). Geothermal energy: heat pumps, hot steam and hot water resources, hot dry rock (HDR) technique. Energy recovery from waste. Greenhouse gas mitigation, CO2 sequestration, chemical bonding of CO2. Consequences of human energy use for ecological systems, atmosphere and climate.
Lecture notesLecture notes will be distributed electronically during the course.
Literature- Kaltschmitt, M., Wiese, A., Streicher, W.: Erneuerbare Energien (Springer, 2003)

- Tester, J.W., Drake, E.M., Golay, M.W., Driscoll, M.J., Peters, W.A.: Sustainable Energy - Choosing Among Options (MIT Press, 2005)

- G. Boyle, Renewable Energy: Power for a sustainable futureOxford University Press, 3rd ed., 2012, ISBN: 978-0-19-954533-9

-V. Quaschning, Renewable Energy and Climate ChangeWiley- IEEE, 2010, ISBN: 978-0-470-74707-0, 9781119994381 (online)
Prerequisites / NoticeFundamentals of chemistry, physics and thermodynamics are a prerequisite for this course.

Topics are available to carry out a Project Work (Semesterarbeit) on the contents of this course.
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