Search result: Catalogue data in Spring Semester 2016

Science, Technology, and Policy Master Information
Core Courses
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
860-0013-00LPolitical Economics
Prerequisite: An introductory course in Economics is required to sign up for this course.
W3 credits2VJ.‑E. Sturm, S. Pichler
AbstractThis course takes incentives of politicians into account to form a better understanding of the formation of policy and the role of different political institutions in shaping economic policy.
ObjectiveIn principles courses of economics, the functioning of markets and ways in which the government can shape and influence are discussed. The implicit assumption thereby is that the government will act in the interest of society at large. This course takes incentives of politicians into account to thereby form a better understanding of the formation of policy and the role of different political institutions in shaping economic policy. The course will consist of three blocks. In the first, the basic issues and the tools of modelling political equilibria will be discussed. These will subsequently be used to look into redistributive policies. The focus thereby is on how the interplay between democratic institutions and self-seeking individuals, lobby groups, and parties determines the degree of redistribution in a society. By taking also intertemporal issues into account, the third part allows us to analyse public debt levels, pensions, capital taxation and economic growth.
Prerequisites / NoticeAn introductory course in Economics is required to sign up for this course.
860-0017-00LArgumentation and Science Communication Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 10.

MSc students, PhD students and postdocs with a science and technology background have priority.
W6 credits3GA. Wenger, C. J. Baumberger, M. Dunn Cavelty, G. Hirsch Hadorn, U. Jasper, R. Knutti
AbstractAnalyzing and communicating the aims and ethical implications of scientific research is an essential element at the intersection of science, technology and policy making. This course is split into two modules which focus (1) on arguing about ethical aspects and scientific uncertainties of policies, and (2) on communicating scientific results to policy-makers and the wider public.
ObjectiveStudents learn to consider uncertainties in inferences from computer simulation results to real-world policy problems and acquire an understanding of ethical positions and arguments concerning values, justice and risks related to policies. They learn how to analyze the particular prerequisites for the successful dissemination of scientific results to policy-makers and the wider public.
ContentAnalyzing and communicating the aims and ethical implications of scientific research is an essential element at the intersection of science, technology and policy making. In the first module of this course, we will provide a framework for considering uncertainties in inferences from computer simulation results to real-world policy problems. Moreover, we will introduce and discuss ethical positions and arguments concerning values, justice and risks related to policies. Subsequently, we will learn how to clarify concepts as well as how to identify, reconstruct and evaluate arguments and complex argumentations. In the second module, we will analyze the particular prerequisites for the successful dissemination of scientific results to policy-makers and the wider public. To get a better understanding of the expectations and needs of different target groups we will invite guest speakers and professionals from both the media and the policy world to share their experiences and discuss common problems. The final part of this course consists of practical applications and exercises. Proceeding in a 'draft/revise/submit'-manner, students will have to present a scientific project (possibly linked to a case study) in two different formats (e.g. newspaper contribution and policy brief). Faculty will supervise the writing process and provide reviews and comments on drafts (in collaboration with ETHZ Hochschulkommunikation and the Language Center).
Schedule:
W1: Introduction
W2: Computer models and simulations: How do we learn about real-world problems by models and computer simulations? What can we infer from their results for policy advice?
W3: Values: What are the implications of basic distinctions in value theory such as intrinsic vs extrinsic/instrumental values, anthropocentric vs non-anthropocentric values, and value monism vs value pluralism for policy assessments?
W4: Justice: What are the ethical arguments for and against different conceptions of intra- and intergenerational justice, such as egalitarianism, grandfathering, polluter or beneficiary pays principle, and capability approaches?
W5: Risks: What are permissible risks from the perspective of different ethical theories, such as utilitarianism, contractualism, deontological and right-based theories?
W6: Concepts and arguments: Clarification of ambiguous and vague concepts, identification and reconstruction of arguments, types of theoretical and practical arguments
W7: Concepts and arguments: Criteria for good arguments, typical fallacies, use of arguments in discussions
W8: The science of science communication: Basic insights from communication theory
W9: Different Audiences, Different Formats: What are the particular prerequisites for the successful dissemination of scientific results to policy-makers? What are the writing and presentation skills needed?
W10: What are the particular prerequisites for communicating with the wider public? The dos and don'ts of media interaction. What are the benefits and challenges of social media?
W11: Study week: Students work on their two 'praxis projects' and submit two drafts.
W12: Supervision and Revision
W13: Supervision and Revision
W14: Wrap-up: Effectively communicating science-related topics and their political and ethical implications to a non-expert audience.
Lecture notesPapers are made available for the participants of this course.
LiteraturePapers are made available for the participants of this course.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe total number of students is 10. MSc students, PhD students and postdocs with a science and technology background have priority; weekly meetings of 3 hours during FS 2016, 6 ETCS (39 contact hours + 141 hours for preparations and exercises); grading based on the exercises on a 1-6 point scale, the parts contribute in the following way: argumentation 50%, science communication 50%.
701-0729-01LEmpirical Social Research Methods Restricted registration - show details W2 credits2GS. Wehrli, I. Günther
AbstractThe course provides an overview of the various methodological approaches in empirical social research and covers the different stages of the research process. Acquired skills are applied in a research project on the topic of "environmental behavior" and "development policy".
ObjectiveUpon completion of the course, students should be familiar with:
(1) The basic principles behind different empirical social-research methods and the conditions under which their use is appropriate
(2) The steps involved in an empirical study
(3) The application of empirical research methods to a research project
ContentEmpirical social research employs a wide variety of research methods, such as surveys or laboratory and non-reactive field experiments. The course will begin with an overview of the various methodological approaches, including their advantages and disadvantages and the conditions under which their use is appropriate. It will continue with a discussion of the different stages of the research process, including hypothesis generation, formulating a research plan, measurement, sampling, data collection and data analysis. This knowledge will be applied to conducting a research project on a suitable topic.
LiteratureBabbie, E. (2009). The Practice of Social Research (11th ed.). Belmont, CA: Wadsworth.
Bryman, A. (2008). Social Research Methods (3rd ed.). Oxford: University Press.
Diekmann, A. (2007). Empirische Sozialforschung (18. Aufl.). Reinbek bei Hamburg: Rowohlt.
860-0019-00LEmpirical Social Research Methods (with Paper) Restricted registration - show details
Only for Science, Technology, and Policy MSc.
W3 credits2G + 1AS. Wehrli, I. Günther
AbstractThe course provides an overview of the various methodological approaches in empirical social research and covers the different stages of the research process. Acquired skills are applied in a research project on the topic of "environmental behavior" and "development policy".
ObjectiveUpon completion of the course, students should be familiar with:
(1) The basic principles behind different empirical social-research methods and the conditions under which their use is appropriate
(2) The steps involved in an empirical study
(3) The application of empirical research methods to a research project
ContentEmpirical social research employs a wide variety of research methods, such as surveys or laboratory and non-reactive field experiments. The course will begin with an overview of the various methodological approaches, including their advantages and disadvantages and the conditions under which their use is appropriate. It will continue with a discussion of the different stages of the research process, including hypothesis generation, formulating a research plan, measurement, sampling, data collection and data analysis. This knowledge will be applied to conducting a research project on a suitable topic.
LiteratureBabbie, E. (2009). The Practice of Social Research (11th ed.). Belmont, CA: Wadsworth.
Bryman, A. (2008). Social Research Methods (3rd ed.). Oxford: University Press.
Diekmann, A. (2007). Empirische Sozialforschung (18. Aufl.). Reinbek bei Hamburg: Rowohlt.
Prerequisites / Noticethis course is linked to the course Empirical Social Research Methods 701-0729-01L
860-0005-01LColloquium Science, Technology, and Policy (FS) Restricted registration - show details
Only for Science, Technology, and Policy MSc.
O1 credit2KT. Bernauer, R. S. Abhari
AbstractPresentations by invited guest speakers from academia and practice/policy. Students are assigned to play a leading role in the discussion and write a report on the respective event.
ObjectivePresentations by invited guest speakers from academia and practice/policy. Students are assigned to play a leading role in the discussion and write a report on the respective event.
Case Studies
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
860-0016-00LSupply and Responsible Use of Mineral Resources II Information Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 12.

Prerequisite:
W3 credits2UB. Wehrli, F. Brugger, C. A. Heinrich, N. Lefebvre, J. Mertens
AbstractStudents integrate their knowledge of mineral resources and technical skills to frame and investigate a commodity-specific challenge faced by countries involved in resource extraction. By own research they evaluate possible policy-relevant solutions, engaging in interdisciplinary teams coached by tutors and experts from natural social and engineering sciences.
ObjectiveStudents will be able to:
- Integrate, and extend by own research, their knowledge of mineral resources from course 860-0015-00, in a solution-oriented team with mixed expertise
- Apply their problem solving, and analytical skills to critically assess, and define a complex, real-world mineral resource problem, and propose possible solutions.
- Summarize and synthesize published literature and expert knowledge, evaluate decision-making tools, and policies applied to mineral resources.
- Document and communicate the findings in concise group presentations and a report.
Lecture notesURL: https://moodle-app2.let.ethz.ch/course/view.php?id=1403
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisite is 860-0015-00 Supply and Responsible Use of Mineral Resources I. Limited to 12 participants, and the lecturers will compose two teams of mixed background and expertise. First priority will be given to students enrolled in the Master of Science, Technology, and Policy Program. These students must confirm their participation by February 8th by registration through MyStudies. Other graduate students interested in enrolling will be placed onto a waiting list when registering through MyStudies. In addition, these students should please send an e-mail to Prof. Heinrich (christoph.heinrich@erdw.ethz.ch) explaining their motivation in a few sentences.
860-0015-00LSupply and Responsible Use of Mineral Resources IW3 credits2GC. A. Heinrich, L. Bretschger, F. Brugger, S. Hellweg, B. Wehrli
AbstractStudents critically assess the economic, social, political, and environmental implications of extracting and using energy resources, metals, and bulk materials along the mineral resource cycle for society. They explore various decision-making tools that support policies and guidelines pertaining to mineral resources, and gain insight into different perspectives from government, industry, and NGOs.
ObjectiveStudents will be able to:
- Explain basic concepts applied in resource economics, economic geology, extraction, processing and recycling technologies, environmental and health impact assessments, resource governance, and secondary materials.
- Evaluate the policies and guidelines pertaining to mineral resource extraction.
- Examine decision-making tools for mineral resource related projects.
- Engage constructively with key actors from governmental organizations, mining and trading companies, and NGOs, dealing with issues along the mineral resource cycle.
LiteratureURL: https://moodle-app2.let.ethz.ch/course/view.php?id=1403
Prerequisites / NoticeSeven week course offered from February 23rd to April 14th.
This course is prerequisite for the case study module course
860-0016-00 Supply and Responsible Use of Mineral Resources II.
Bachelor of Science or Engineering, and enrolled in a Master's or PhD program at ETH Zurich.
860-0012-00LCooperation and Conflict Over International Water Resources
Note: Replacement of 701-0462-01L "The Science and Politics of International Water Management".
Students who already attended 701-0462-01L, kann not be credited again for this course.
W3 credits2SB. Wehrli, T. Bernauer, J. Mertens
AbstractThis course focuses on the technical, economic, and political challenges of dealing with water allocation and pollution problems in large international river basins. It examines ways and means through which such challenges are addressed, and when and why international efforts in this respect succeed or fail.

This is a research seminar at the Master level. PhD students are also welcome.
ObjectiveThe students get an overview of (1) causes and consequences of water scarcity and water pollution problems in large international river basins; (2) they learn concepts to assess and mitigate such water challenges, and (3) they analyze when and why international efforts in this respect succeed or fail.
ContentBased on lectures and discussion of scientific papers students acquire basic knowledge on contentious issues in managing international water resources, on the determinants of cooperation and conflict over international water issues, and on ways and means of mitigating conflict and promoting cooperation. Students will then, in teams of two and coached by Profs. Bernauer and Wehrli, do research on a case of their choice (i.e. an international river basin where riparian countries are trying to find solutions to water allocation and/or water quality problems). They will write a brief paper and present their findings during a final meeting at the end of the semester.
The first 4 and the last 2 dates are reserved for lectures and seminars. The students work on their case study from 22.03. to 17.05.
Lecture notesslides and papers will be distributed electronically
LiteratureThe UN World Water Development Report 2015 provides a broad overview of the topic
http://www.unwater.org/publications/publications-detail/en/c/281166/
Prerequisites / NoticeThe course is open to Master and PhD students from any area of ETH.
051-0160-00LUrban Design II Information W1 credit2VA. Brillembourg, H. Klumpner
AbstractThe lecture series will introduce tools for reading contemporary urban conditions, patterns and processes. Each lecture will introduce a city and three extracted operational tools, which we have deciphered. The tool format offers a structure for understanding of how urban landscape has taken shape as well as a basis for developing an own position by synthesizing information into future practice.
ObjectiveUrban Stories aims to amplify the students' repertoire of urban instruments and empowers to critically reflect on the urban environment. This lectures series will produce a toolbox containing operational urban tools that provide students with knowledge to navigate between theory and practice. The tools will be used as a basis for reading cities and recognizing in them current operational modes, models and phenomena.

Urban Stories promotes a critical and analytical, research-based approach on crosscutting scales and timelines by offering a methodology that respects the political, socio-economic and ecological components of urban design and planning. Through this lens, and with our toolbox, we aim to tell the fundamental story of contemporary cities. The course provides information, analysis and knowledge to help students to prepare for their own justifiable interventions in the future.
ContentHow did cities develop into the cities we live in now? Which urban plans, instruments, visions, political decisions, economic reasonings, cultural inputs and social organization have influenced urban settlements in specific moments of change? Which cities are exemplary in illustrating how these instruments have been implemented and how they have shaped urban environments? Can these instruments be translated into urban operational tools that we recognize within existing tested cases in contemporary cities across the globe? How can the tools and cities be compared and put into a system rather than a database? Can this system show unusual connections and foster the transfer of knowledge among cities? Urban form cannot be reduced to the physical space. Cities are the result of social construction under the influence of technologies, culture, the impact of experts and accidents. Unconcluded urban processes respond to political interests, economic pressure, cultural inclinations, along with the imagination of architects and planners and the informal powers at work in complex adaptive systems. Current urban phenomena are the result of an urban evolution. The facts stored in urban environments include contributions from its entire lifecycle. That is true for the physical environment, but also for non-physical aspects, the imaginary city that exists along with its potentials and problems and with the conflicts that have evolved over time. Knowledge and understanding along with a critical observation of the actions, processes and policies are necessary to perceive the diversity and instability present in the contemporary city.
Lecture notesThe Skript can be downloaded from the student-server:
afp://brillembourg-klumpner-server.ethz.ch
LiteratureThe learning material can be downloaded from the student-server: afp://brillembourg-klumpner-server.ethz.ch

Please check also the Chair website: http://u-tt.arch.ethz.ch
Prerequisites / NoticeEXERCISE
After each lecture, students are asked to produce an exercise based on the presented tools. The format of the Exercise is an A3 or an A4, according to the given template. Each student has one week to prepare each exercise, and it should be delivered in the next lecture. (Language: preferably English, German).
The exercise tasks are a valuable addition to understand the class contents and therefore it is highly recommendable to finalize all weekly exercise tasks as an individually conducted work.

"Semesterkurs" (semester course) students from other departments or students taking this lecture as GESS / Studium Generale course as well as exchange students must successfully hand in a Research Paper at the end of the semester, which will be subject to the performance assessment: "Bestanden" (pass) or "Nicht bestanden" (failed). The performance assessment type, for "Urban Design II" taken as a semester course, is categorized as "unbenotete Semesterleistung" (ungraded semester performance).
063-0816-16LACTION! On the Real City (Thesis Elective) Information Restricted registration - show details
Thesis Elective for Master class students.

Enrolment only possible upon agreement with the lecturer.
W6 credits11AA. Brillembourg, H. Klumpner
AbstractIn relation to the elective course "ACTION!" students will have the possibility to extend their research into the behaviours and components that make up the urban realm. A special focus on the processes and mechanisms of (in)formal urban forms and systems will characterise the research. Specific research goals tailored to individual interests will be discussed before proceeding.
ObjectiveThe course will help frame an understanding of the forces shaping (in)formal settlements and the critical behaviours, requirements and practices of its inhabitants. It will also encourage the development of an analytical and critical position on the potential role of the architect to mediate a design process within broader socio-economic, political and ecologic systems.
860-0018-00LInternet Architecture & Policy (with Case Study) Information Restricted registration - show details W6 credits4SS. Bechtold, T. Roscoe
AbstractThis course examines and critiques the design of the Internet, with a focus on the connection between the engineering features and principles of the network and the legal, economic, and political concerns which have followed its evolution.
ObjectiveThis course examines and critiques the design of the Internet (broadly defined), with a focus on the connection between the engineering features and principles of the network (packet switching, global addressing, the end-to-end argument, etc.) and the legal, economic, and political concerns which have followed its evolution (security properties, censorship and censorship resistance, "net neutrality", etc.). No prior knowledge of networking technologies is required; conversely the course will focus only on those features of the Internet design which have strong political and legal implications (and vice versa). The course consists of two parts: lectures and seminars in one part provide an introduction and discussion of the technical, legal, and political aspects of the Internet design. The other part consists of a specific case study of some aspect of the Internet by individual students.
227-0664-00LTechnology and Policy of Electrical Energy StorageW4 credits2GV. Wood, T. Schmidt
AbstractWith the global emphasis on decreasing CO2 emissions, achieving fossil fuel independence and growing the use of renewables, developing & implementing energy storage solutions for electric mobility & grid stabilization represent a key technology & policy challenge. This course primarily uses lithium ion batteries as a case study to understand the interplay between technology, economics & policy.
ObjectiveThe students will learn of the complexity involved in battery research, design, production, as well as in investment, economics and policy making around batteries. Students from technical disciplines will gain insights into policy, while students from social science backgrounds will gain insights into technology.
ContentWith the global emphasis on decreasing CO2 emissions, achieving fossil fuel independence, and integrating renewables on the electric grid, developing and implementing energy storage solutions for electric mobility and grid stabilization represent a key technology and policy challenge. The class will focus on lithium ion batteries since they are poised to enter a variety of markets where policy decisions will affect their production, adoption, and usage scenarios. The course considers the interplay between technology, economics, and policy.

* intro to energy storage for electric mobility and grid-stabilization
* basics of battery operation, manufacturing, and integration
* hands-on fabrication and testing of a cell
* intro to the role of policy for energy storage innovation & diffusion
* discussion of complexities involved in policy and politics of energy storage
Lecture notesMaterials will be made available on the website.
LiteratureMaterials will be made available on the website.
Prerequisites / NoticeStrong interest in energy and technology policy.
860-0014-00LPaper Project on Technology and Policy of Electric Energy Storage Restricted registration - show details
Requirement: Only students who have visited the course 227-0664-00L and passed the test at the end of the semester, may sign up for this course.
W2 credits1AT. Schmidt, V. Wood
AbstractPaper project on a topic related to main lecture Technology and Policy of Electric Energy Storage. Can only be taken when enrolled in the main lecture.
ObjectiveThe students will choose either a technology or a policy and elaborate on various aspects. The technology questions will include policy aspects; the policy questions will be closely related technological diffusion and innovation.
Lecture notesMaterials will be made available through polybox.
LiteratureMaterials will be made available through polybox.
Prerequisites / NoticeSuccessful completion of Technology and Policy of Electric Energy Storage lecture (227-0664-00L).
701-1562-00LCases in Environmental Policy and Decision Making Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 40.
W6 credits4PA. Patt, M. Morosini, D. Schröter, A. Scolobig
AbstractThe course will proceed through a series of case studies, modeled after those often used in business and policy teaching curricula. Students will engage in individual and group work to practice the art of effective decision-making, recommending a course of action for the individual and organization that is the subject of each case, gaining valuable insights into environmental policy-making.
Objective- Identify the facts, assumptions, theories, and social constructions guiding the decisions of different stakeholders to a range of environmental and natural resource policy problems.
- Recognize key institutional and interpersonal challenges in decision-making situations.
- Design communication and decision-making processes that can work effectively in the context of stakeholder worldviews and perspectives.
- Conduct qualitative and quantitative analysis of value to decision-makers, and communicate that in a manner that is clear and effective.
- Consider broader policy issues applicable across the cases, such as the appropriate roles of public, non-profit, and private sector organizations, the decentralization of authority, and possible societal pathways towards sustainability.
ContentThe course will cover a range of environmental problem areas, include land conversion, water quality, air quality, climate change, and energy. Across these issues, cases will force students to confront particular decisions needing to be made by individuals and organizations, primarily in the public and non-profit sectors, but also in provate sector firms.
Prerequisites / NoticeIt would be desirable, but not essential, that students had already taken a course on policy analysis and modeling.
101-0588-02LGrounded Materials Restricted registration - show details
Maximal 4 Studenten pro Departement:
D-BAUG
D-ARCH
D-USYS
D-MATL
D-GESS (nur Science, Technology and Policy MSc)
W4 credits6GG. Habert
AbstractGrounded Materials will develop sustainable building materials by disrupting current teaching in two fundamental ways. First instead of studying each material separately we will combine them in creative and unexpected ways - we call this trans-material. Secondly, we will work with selected stakeholders to ground construction materials in a societal context - we call this trans-disciplinary.
ObjectiveOverview
Teaching of the block course "Grounded Materials" brings together the knowledge of the chair of Sustainable Construction (SC), the Transdisciplinarity Lab (TdLab) and Atelier Matières à Construire (Amàco) through trans-material and trans-disciplinary approaches. Students receive input, do experiments and workshops to develop skills in materials, creating materials, construction with materials and the relationship of materials to stakeholders and their role in the construction industry. The aim is to convey a holistic approach to materials teaching and their role for sustainable development.

"Grounded Materials" is built on two pillars:
Teaching Trans-Material
Instead of teaching wood, steel and concrete we teach the constituting matter of all materials like fibres, grains and binders across different materials. Materials thus can be differently reconstituted, e.g. through a locally specific or available assembly of matter.
Together with experts on material sciences, students will experiment with materials and their physical properties. Concrete is made of grains and a binder. However, the physical properties that allows to improve strength properties through packing optimisation in concrete can also be used to other contexts such as for instance desert sand, earth and all sort of urban waste. Similar attitudes considering fibres or binding agent allows a true trans-material approach.

Teaching Trans-Disciplinary
In addition to the environmental considerations, future engineers and architects have to consider increasingly complex societal context. "Grounded Materials" considers construction materials, and potential future materials in relation to their societal impact and in negotiation with selected stakeholders in this field (producers, users, developers, owners,...).
Together with experts, "Grounded Materials" will provide a forum for students to explore materials in dialog with stakeholders from the construction sector considering social and environmental constraints. Sustainable construction materials will be grounded in discussion between students, scientists, builders and producers to enable addressing emergent issues related to society and the environment.

Proceedings
In the first five days students will be exposed to basic trans-material and trans-disciplinary principles. This will allow them to frame the problem at stake and fix key parameters and constraints for the development of a new sustainable material.
The experimental lectures will showcase materials science through a series of innovative, and at times counterintuitive experiments. Here physical phenomena are presented through simple sensitive experiments. Creative sessions will allow students to freely explore various ideas for innovative materials design.
In terms of trans-disciplinary teaching, students will also be guided through three different activities during which they will engage with stakeholders, site visits, consultation and co-creation activities.
In addition to the trans-material, and trans-disciplinary teaching, students will receive a series of inputs, in the form of introductory lectures on the societal and environmental challenges facing the built environment.

In the second part of course, the students will work collaboratively on the challenge of developing a grounded material that responds to specific constraints and parameters. The students will receive guidance, through departmental tutors, material experts, and interactions with stakeholders during these work sessions.

Further Information:
- Chair of Sustainable Construction, Prof. Dr. Guillaume Habert (Host), Dr. Coralie Brumaud and Sasha Cisar, http://www.ibi.ethz.ch/sc/
- D-USYS TdLAB, http://www.tdlab.usys.ethz.ch/
- Atelier Matières à Construire (Amàco), http://www.amaco.org/

All inquiries can be directed to: grounded.materials@ibi.baug.ethz.ch
ContentThe following topics give an overview of the themes that are to be worked on during the lecture.

- Trans-Material: Experiments to understand physical properties of materials and how materials are created in order to achieve sustainable construction
- Trans-Disciplinary: Workshops and site-visits, stakeholder interaction and negotiating social dimension of sustainable construction
- Project: Application of learned knowledge in developing a material and building element, in negotiation with stakeholder and aligned with sustainable development
Lecture notesAll relevant information will be online available before the block course.
LiteratureA list of the basic literature will be offered on a specific online platform that could be used by all students attending the block course.
Electives
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
851-0585-38LData Science in Techno-Socio-Economic Systems Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 70.

This course is thought be for students in the 5th semester or above with quantitative skills and interests in modeling and computer simulations.

Particularly suitable for students of D-INFK, D-ITET, D-MAVT, D-MTEC, D-PHYS
W3 credits2VE. Pournaras, D. Helbing, I. Moise
AbstractThis course introduces how techno-socio-economic systems in our nowadays digital society can be better understood with techniques and tools of data science. Students shall learn the fundamentals of data science, machine learning, but also advanced distributed real-time data analytics in the Planetary Nervous System. Students shall deliver and present a seminar thesis at the end of the course.
ObjectiveThe goal of this course is to qualify students with knowledge on data science as a way to understand complex techno-socio-economic systems in our nowadays digital societies. This course aims to make students capable of applying the most appropriate and effective techniques of data science under different application scenarios. The course aims to engage students in exciting state-of-the-art scientific and collaboration platforms such as the Planetary Nervous System. The course shall increase the awareness level of students about the challenges and open issues of data science in socio-technical domains such as privacy. Finally students have the opportunity to develop their writing, presentation and collaboration skills based on a seminar thesis they have to deliver and present at the end of the course
102-0488-00LWater Resources ManagementW3 credits2GD. Anghileri
AbstractModern engineering approach to problems of sustainable water resources, planning and management of water allocation requires the understanding of modelling techniques that allow to account for comprehensive water uses (thereby including ecological needs) and stakeholders needs, long-term analysis and optimization. The course presents the most relevant approaches to address these problems.
ObjectiveThe course provides the essential knowledge and tools of water resources planning and management. Core of the course are the concepts of data analysis, simulation, optimization and reliability assessment in relation to water projects and sustainable water resources management.
ContentThe course is organized in four parts.
Part 1 is a general introduction to the purposes and aims of sustainable water resources management, problem understanding and tools identification.
Part 2 recalls Time Series Analysis and Linear Stochastic Models. An introduction to Nonlinear Time Series Analysis and related techniques will then be made in order to broaden the vision of how determinism and stochasticity might sign hydrological and geophysical variables.
Part 3 deals with the optimal allocation of water resources and introduces to several tools traditionally used in WRM, such as linear and dynamic programming. Special attention will be devoted to optimization (deterministic and stochastic) and compared to simulation techniques as design methods for allocation of water resources in complex and competitive systems, with focus on sustainability and stakeholders needs.
Part 4 will introduce to basic indexes used in economical and reliability analyses, and will focus on multicriteria analysis methods as a tool to assess the reliability of water systems in relation to design alternatives.
Lecture notesA copy of the lecture handouts will be available on the webpage of the course. Complementary documentation in the form of scientific and technical articles, as well as excerpts from books will be also made available.
LiteratureA number of book chapters and paper articles will be listed and suggested to read. They will also be part of discussion during the oral examination.
Prerequisites / NoticeSuggested relevant courses: Hydrologie I (or a similar content course) and Wasserhaushalt (Teil "Wasserwirtschaft", 4. Sem. UmweltIng., or a similar content course) for those students not belonging to Environmental Engineering.
118-0112-00LParticipatory and Integrated Water Resources Planning Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 25.

The course is complementary to "Water Resources Management" (102-0488-00L).
W3 credits3VA. Castelletti
AbstractThe course develops basic knowledge and skills for modelling, planning and managing water resources systems in a balanced and sustainable way. The emphasis will be on the operational aspects of water management, including: introduction to participatory decision-making, modelling of the multiple stakes and socio-economic processes, introduction to dynamic and stochastic optimization approaches.
ObjectiveThe course aims at illustrating the complex framework of participatory approach in the field of water resources projects, with particular focus on the modelling of the quantitative aspects of the combined dynamics of the physical and socio-economic processes.
ContentLec 00. Course introduction. The world water resources. Water crisis and the concept of Participatory and Integrated Water Resources Management (PIWRM). Water trading.

Lec 01. Rationalizing the decision-making process. From traditional water resources planning and management to PIWRM: rationalizing and supporting the decision-making process. The need for negotiations. Negotiation game.
Outline of the Participatory and Integrated Planning procedure proposed as a guidance to the decision-making process using a real world case study.

Lec 02. Cloosing the loop: how to plan the management. How to incorporate recurrent management decisions into a rational decision-making framework. From model based decision-making to decision support systems. Full-rationality and partial-rationality. Underlying example the Zambezi river system.

Lec 03. Actions and evaluation criteria. Identification of the actions suitable to pursue the overall objective of the planning exercise. Type of actions and associated property. Embedding actions into models. Stakeholders, sectors and evaluation criteria: how stakeholders evaluate the planning alternatives. Criterion hierarchy and indicators: operationalize evaluation criteria.

Lec 04. Criteria and indicators. Example of indicators. Validation of the indicators against the stakeholders. Numerical exercise. Underlying examples from Red River System (Vietnam), Tono dam (Japan), Googong reservoir (Australia), Lake Maggiore and Lake Como (Italy).

Lec 05. Re-operating the Kafue reservoir system. Real world case study developed interactively with the students, to experience all the concepts provided in the previous lectures. Reading material will be assigned on 22.3

Lec 06. Models of a water system. The system analysis perspective on water resources modelling. Example of models of water system components (reservoir, diversion dam, rivers, users). Implications of cooperation and information sharing on the model formulation. Operational implications of model complexity. Case studies.

Lec 07. Formulation of the planning/management problem. Why we need it. What do we need to formulate the problem: from the indicators to the objectives; time horizon; scenarios. Dealing with uncertainty. Problem formulation and classification. How do modelling choices affect the final solution (hidden subjectivity).

Lec 08. Water resources optimal planning. The planning of water resources. Examples from real world problems at different scales (e.g. Egypt Water plan; Controlling salt intrusion in Nauru (Pacific Island); planning water quality remediation interventions in lakes and reservoirs (Googong reservoir, Australia)). Interactive lectures with students. Overview of the different approaches available to resolve the problem, from exact solution to heuristic.

Lec 09. Planning the New Valley water system in Egypt. Real world case study developed interactively with the student, to experience all the concepts provided in the previous lectures.

Lec 10. Planning in non stationary conditions: the Red River (Vietnam). Real world case study developed interactively with the student, to experience all the concepts provided in the previous lectures.
Lecture notesCourse lectures are almost fully covered by the following two textbooks accordingly to the indications provided at the end of each lecture:

R. Soncini-Sessa, A. Castelletti, and E. Weber, 2007. Integrated and participatory water resources management. Theory. Elsevier, The Netherlands.

R. Soncini-Sessa, F. Cellina, F. Pianosi, and E. Weber, 2007. Integrated and participatory water resources management. Practice. Elsevier, The Netherlands.
LiteratureAdditional readings:
S.P. Simonovic, 2009. Managing water resources: Methods and tools for a systems approach, Earthscan, London.
D.P. Loucks, E. van Beek, 2005. Water Resources Systems Planning and Management: An Introduction to Methods, Models and Applications, UNESCO, Paris.
K.D.W. Nandalal, J. Bogardi, 2007. Dynamic Programming Based Operation of Reservoirs, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.
Prerequisites / NoticeLecture notes, slides and other material will be posted on the course web page the day before each lecture.
351-0778-00LDiscovering Management
Entry level course in management for BSc, MSc and PHD students at all levels not belonging to D-MTEC.
This course can be complemented with Discovering Management (Excercises) 351-0778-01L.
W3 credits3GF. Hacklin, M. Ambühl, S. Brusoni, E. Fleisch, P. Frauenfelder, G. Grote, V. Hoffmann, P. Schönsleben, D. Sornette, J.‑E. Sturm, G. von Krogh, F. von Wangenheim
AbstractDiscovering Management offers an introduction to the field of business management and entrepreneurship for engineers and natural scientists. The module provides an overview of the principles of management, teaches knowledge about management that is highly complementary to the students' technical knowledge, and provides a basis for advancing the knowledge of the various subjects offered at D-MTEC.
ObjectiveDiscovering Management offers an integrated learning system, which combines in an innovate format a set of lectures, an advanced business game simulation and a set of group exercises involving industry speakers (ranging from leading venture capitalists to executives at established corporations). Unlike more traditional courses, the learning model for Discovering Management involves 'learning by doing'. While the 13 different lectures, in-class discussions and assigned readings provide the theoretical and conceptual foundations, the experiential learning outcomes result from the interrelated group activities: 1) the interactive case studies and exercises, 2) the business game simulation.
By discovering the key aspects of entrepreneurial management, the purpose of the course is to advance students' understanding of factors driving company success, where success is understood as a broad construct including financial return, employee, customer and supplier satisfaction as well as social and ecological responsibility.
Discovering Management is designed to suit the needs and expectations of Bachelor students at all levels as well as Master and PhD students not belonging to D-MTEC. By providing an overview of Entrepreneurial Management, this course is an ideal enrichment of the standard curriculum at ETH Zurich. No prior knowledge of business or economics is required to successfully complete this course.
ContentThe lectures for Discovering Management are designed to broaden the participant's understanding of the principles of entrepreneurial management, emphasizing the interdependence of various specialties in the development and management of a firm. For this reason, the lectures are structured on the basis of a coherent business model and will be presented by the respective area specialists at D-MTEC.
The lectures broaden the view and the understanding of technology by interlinking it with society. Corporate sustainability, for example, introduces economic, ecological and social issues that are relevant to all engineering disciplines. Practical examples stimulate the students to assess these issues and be aware of their responsibilities as engineers. Technology and innovation management, to mention a second example, focuses on the interplay of technical and organizational change, and how these often neglected interactions explain why many new technologies are never used. It fosters the students' ability to see the business and social consequences of their 'technical' decisions.
Critical skills will be trained by the case study exercise, a participant-centered learning activity, which provides students with the opportunity to place themselves in the role of the decision maker, as they learn more about the specific case and identify the challenge they are faced with. Students will be presented real case scenarios by industry guests from established corporations and will have to critically analyze specific issues. The case study exercise will provide an insight into the context of a managerial problem-solving and enhance the participant's appreciation for the complex tasks companies deal with.
Discovering Management attempts to overcome the limitations of traditional teaching curricula of management in technical universities, which often merely focus on transferring specific skills to students, e.g. planning or forecasting. In response to the new challenges for entrepreneurial decision-making, students will be offered the opportunity to actively engage in an advanced business game simulation; a business game that establishes a link between business management theory and business management in practice. The simulation presents a realistic model of a company and provides participants with the opportunity to quickly gain the lasting effects of practical experience in a risk-free environment. All this provides a valuable learning platform to integrate the increasingly important development of the skills and competences required to identify entrepreneurial opportunities, analyze the future business environment and successfully respond to it by taking systematic decisions, e.g. critical assessment of technological possibilities.
Prerequisites / NoticeDiscovering Management is designed to suit the needs and expectations of Bachelor students at all levels as well as Master and PhD students not belonging to D-MTEC. By providing an overview of Business Management, this course is an ideal enrichment of the standard curriculum at ETH Zurich.
No prior knowledge of business or economics is required to successfully complete this course.
351-0778-01LDiscovering Management (Exercises)
Complementary exercises for the module Discovering Managment.

Prerequisite: Participation and successful completion of the module Discovering Management (351-0778-00L) is mandatory.
W1 credit1UP. Frauenfelder
AbstractThis course is offered complementary to the basis course 351-0778-00L, "Discovering Management". The course offers additional exercises and case studies.
ObjectiveThis course is offered to complement the course 351-0778-00L. The course offers additional exercises and case studies.
ContentThe course offers additional exercises and case studies concerning:
Strategic Management; Technology and Innovation Management; Operations and Supply Chain Management; Finance and Accounting; Marketing and Sales.

Please refer to the course website for further information on the content, credit conditions and schedule of the module: www.dm.ethz.ch
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